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Old 18-06-2018, 17:55   #4201
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Outboards on a tri make some sense, but only for in a harbor maneuvering or on other flat, peaceful water. But that is not when it is important.

Nothing sharpens your decision-making skills better than the real risk of the danger you put yourself or others into by being under-powered. I have hauled other boats away from lee shores, off reefs, towed others to port and beaten into seas that would have overwhelmed a boat that is lightly-powered or uses outboard engine/s. The consequences of not doing those things would have been serious, either for me or for others.

One trip up the WA state coast cured me of any ideas of using the long-legged outboard power installed by the PO. They were mounted close to the center-line of the boat and well-forward of the transom, but spent half their time screaming in the air and the other half with water flying over the cowling. And I prayed they would not drown. And this was not a serious storm situation!

After a while I just had to hoist the windward OB right out of the water - it was useless. We managed to make harbor by motor-sailing, but it was not easy. It was exciting though - I had to be part cowboy and climb over the transom so I could pull-start these manual-start outboards! Remember - you would need extra money for electric-start models.

I have noticed the small engines that designers have suggested for their various boats. These are usually hopelessly inadequate for the real world of what the sea can throw at you and I think they endanger the inexperienced sailor. I removed my outboards and their sleds and gear, and installed a 35 Hp Universal (Kubota) inboard diesel. This engine runs economically and gives me lots of battery charging ability and hot water heat for the cabin. It is totally reliable in starting and running - which was not the case with the outboards. I hope to get a feathering prop, but even if I don't, the standard 2-blade prop I have on it only slows us down about 1/4 knot.

When talking weight, the two outboards, sleds and their gear came very close to the weight of the one diesel - and I don't have to carry as much fuel (think weight of fuel) to go the same distance, and it is not as explosive.

In 35 years of sailing I have never had a problem with water entry though the prop shaft gland or any through-hulls and frankly don't know anyone who has. My inboard cannot be easily stolen and on the rare occasions needed, it is easy to work on with (mostly) standard tools. As well, being Kubota based, the parts are cheaper as you can usually get equivalent parts from dealers of Kubota tractors and industrial engines all over the world. Because they are everywhere. This is not the case with some other brands like Yanmar or Volvo - even if they are great engines. Ask a Yanmar or Volvo owner what he thinks about the price of their parts!

The time to worry about engine power is not when you are in trouble - it is now - and you will have much greater peace of mind. As in every other aspect of a boat, think safety first. I know I made the right choice.

What's a life worth?



Good luck and best wishes, RR.



PS.If you do use a pair of outboards, consider hinging the sled for it under the FORWARD beams and have the outboards rise up through the ventilation slot between the main hull and floats. If you have one. This will place the outboard in the most consistent level of water around the boat in bad weather and will allow you to work on the outboard in a safe location!
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Old 18-06-2018, 21:50   #4202
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Yeah, I'm not advocating twin outboards - for all the reasons others have pointed out but, if you're on a budget...

Having said that, if you have a petrol-powered portable gennie (as many people do) then having petrol-powered outboards makes sense from a 'single fuel' perspective.

The other advantage to outbooards is they are ubiquitous - so you can find mechanics and spare parts pretty much anywhere in the world, especially if you buy Yamaha engines, which seem to be the motor of choice for panga boats (although admittedly they usually use 40, 60 or 90HP motors).

Similarly, in favour of diesel motors, you can find mechanics anywhere there is a fishing fleet, as larger seine boats etc tend to be diesel-powered.

But parts for yacht-sized diesel motors? Not so much.

Another option I've not seen anyone do on a tri - but which should work well, I think, is for hydraulic motors in both amas, with the main engine and hydraulic pump in the vaka. The lack of need for a shaft makes engine placement easier, but there is a need for a hydraulic fluid tank as well as fuel tank, as the only flip side of this.

A friend has this set-up on a 47ft cat with a single motor driving the two hydraulic props and it's *very* economical for a cat, which usually have two engines the same size as the single one he uses.

Boat turns on a dime in his tight marina space with twin controls, contra thrusting to spin the boat in its own length. Makes getting in and out of the berth a piece of cake.

The advantage of these motors is they are very small, and therefore could pack neatly into the amas.

I'd be intrigued to see one if anyone tried it....
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Old 21-06-2018, 14:04   #4203
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Hey guys, thanks for all the great info and advice on powering a Searunner. I found out that all the new Yanmars are computerized so I don't think I want that. I did some research on the marinized Kubota's, the Beta's, and they look like the best choice.

I will be doing the install myself, so does anyone have any tips for finding an insane deal on a 20 to 25 HP Beta? Any thoughts on buying a used one as well as tips for saving money with the installation? Propellers, etc?

Thanks again.
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Old 21-06-2018, 19:06   #4204
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

First thought is to go first class with the fuel system. Make your fuel tank serviceable, bad fuel is THE major source of problems down the road. I'll look forward to following your progress.
Secondly, the more knowledgeable you become on the system the more you can take on yourself.

Best of luck!
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Old 21-06-2018, 19:32   #4205
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Yeah, second that. Multiple inline filters that are switchable between each other, so if you get a sudden failure to proceed, you can quickly flick a lever and try a restart using the already installed fresh and unused filter.
It might save you going onto the rocks....
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Old 22-06-2018, 07:00   #4206
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

on our Searunner 34 we have two 11.5 gallon plastic fuel tanks mounted in the fwd cockpit well on either side of the centerboard trunk. these gravity feed to a racor fuel/water separator with a filter mounted to the starboard side of the centerboard trunk in the aft cabin, right in plain sight. very easy to see if you're getting any contamination, quick and easy to drain any water out of the bottom of the filter. there's a set of valves mounted just above the filter to switch tanks . in 12 years there's never been any significant issues.
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Old 23-06-2018, 04:41   #4207
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Re: Best auxiliary power for a 34' Searunner Trimaran?

Quote:
Originally Posted by magentawave View Post
I PMed Mark Johnson (he built and cruises his Searunner 34) a couple times and he recommended the 3 cylinder 20 HP Yanma. He said it would cost about $10,000.00 IF I did everything myself. Aaargh. Why do you recommend a 2 cylinder Beta verses something like the 20 HP Yanmar?






Thanks for the links. Are the OB's all the way down in those photos? If so, it looks like the props are barely below the waterline. I guess your thinking was that the OB's would be good for smooth and glassy conditions with no waves only, like in a calm harbor, right? Are those long shafts? What HP?






Downside to OB's is that over time fuel costs will be a lot higher than a diesel, but I sure like the simplicity of OB's and having less thru hulls! The only way I could see an OB working properly on a Searunner 34 in rough conditions would be to bring it as close to amidships as possible and get the props down really low. Jim Brown accomplished that when he retrofitted a sled on his 31. The 34 though is so much bigger and heavier than the 31 and has a lot more windage. Anyone heard of an OB sled on a Searunner 34?
The engines in the pictures are in the up position. The engines are on standard outboard motor mounts that can be raised and lowed. When the engines are all the way down the props are about 12" below the waterline.
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Old 23-06-2018, 07:57   #4208
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Any areas requiring special attention I should look at on a SR37? Being a homebuilt I know this isn't an easy question, highly dependent on builder etc.

Any comments on sailing ability in inshore/coastal waters. Read mention of hobby-horseing....
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Old 24-06-2018, 16:27   #4209
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dymaxion View Post
Any areas requiring special attention I should look at on a SR37? Being a homebuilt I know this isn't an easy question, highly dependent on builder etc.

Any comments on sailing ability in inshore/coastal waters. Read mention of hobby-horseing....
Centerboard, centerboard trunk, rudder and the rig.
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Old 24-06-2018, 23:13   #4210
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Blewit John - unfortunately even if it is the upper edges of the outboards props are only 12" under water, air will be sucked down when the aft end of the tri rises or a trough of a wave passes by and you will lose propulsion. As mentioned before, the place for a tri that has the most consistent water level in amidships, and that is where I would try to position the outboards. But they should be at minimum long leg models or even better they should be extra-long leg models, with electric start. Cheers, RR.
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Old 24-06-2018, 23:25   #4211
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

...what he said but also on pivoting pods, so they float up and odwn with the wave state, maintaining prop depth
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Old 25-06-2018, 07:07   #4212
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

[QUOTE=Dymaxion;2658127]Any areas requiring special attention I should look at on a SR37? Being a homebuilt I know this isn't an easy question, highly dependent on builder etc.

Definitly check the deck lockers and surrounding areas for rot.
They were badly engineered and will rot and fail in time
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Old 22-07-2018, 19:21   #4213
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Anyone currently sailing a Searunner 37 in Northeastern US , Atlantic Canada or Ontario?

I’m looking at purchasing one, but it’s not in the water so was looking for an opportunity to experience being on one before moving ahead. Only other tri I’ve been on is a Corsair 31.

Thanks
Doug
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Old 12-09-2018, 10:54   #4214
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

What do other Searunner owners do for a windlass? I don't have one and I am getting too old to pull it up by hand anymore...
And what about the problem of the location of the anchor lockers, I have two. On deck port and starboard, just aft of the forward wing edges, but I do launch the anchor from bow rollers on the bow.
Manual or electric? Weight issues?
Any and all advice, experience and suggestions appreciated.
My boat is a Searunner 40.
Thanks!
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Old 12-09-2018, 17:03   #4215
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Jim Brown advocates a snatch block on the inside portion of the amas near their bows. He used a single anchor rode which split into two pieces, each piece going through one of the snatch blocks and then onto the fore deck to be secured to cleats. This way the boat is more balanced for the prevailing current, and/or wind, as opposed to a single rode attached to the main hull.
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