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Old 28-07-2013, 10:10   #391
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Originally Posted by letsgetsailing3 View Post

I like honesty.

The tradeoff seems to be between aesthetics and space. Most people on a boat find space at a premium. Those nice lines are a luxury.
I agree that space is important. Our boat has enough storage that it is possible to overload it. I worry more about weight than about lack of room to store stuff. The storage space is spread throughout the boat which is helpful when loading for long term cruising.
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Old 28-07-2013, 11:14   #392
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Re: Modern Production Cruisers at Sea

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Originally Posted by letsgetsailing3 View Post
I like honesty.

The tradeoff seems to be between aesthetics and space. Most people on a boat find space at a premium. Those nice lines are a luxury.
My whole boat is a luxury. Most of us don't need the "optimum" boat, and in any case your optimum boat might be completely different than my optimum boat.

For what it's worth, my canoe-stern boat has more stowage space than many similar-size more modern designs. I have less elbow room down below, which can be a good thing, but probably more lockers.

To continue the honesty, the aft cabin on my boat is microscopic compared to a modern Beneteau (etc). It sleeps one comfortably, but it's a good thing that my wife and I like each other -- it's really cramped for two. The canoe stern, and moderately low freeboard (compared to some, anyway) do take their toll on interior space.
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Old 28-07-2013, 11:24   #393
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Re: Modern Production Cruisers at Sea

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Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
Well, mine is a very heavy duty weldment that is incorporated into the stemhead fitting.

It is strong enough that I have always lead the snubber over it to avoid chafe, despite what Marc says in his post.

And this sort of detail is part of what differentiates between the price point production boats and "higher end" versions (pointed out for those who can't understand that there is a difference). Whether this makes a difference to the individual buyer is a personal thing, and can not be judged by someone else.

Cheers,

Jim
So.....is it welded onto the fiberglass? oh, and does the fact that the rigging stresses are on it as well as the anchor make it even better?
Sorry, but I'm just not getting this "bolt on" reference! Now if someone said "that Bene fixture is only volted on by four 5/16" bolts and my Oyster has seven 1/2" bolts..." that I could understand.... but unles you have a metal boat, you roller is either glassed as part of the hull /deck or bolted on.....
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Old 28-07-2013, 15:40   #394
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Re: Modern Production Cruisers at Sea

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Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
So.....is it welded onto the fiberglass? oh, and does the fact that the rigging stresses are on it as well as the anchor make it even better?
Sorry, but I'm just not getting this "bolt on" reference! Now if someone said "that Bene fixture is only volted on by four 5/16" bolts and my Oyster has seven 1/2" bolts..." that I could understand.... but unles you have a metal boat, you roller is either glassed as part of the hull /deck or bolted on.....
Well, you do have a point there, mate. But let's look a bit closer...

The type of roller shown is bolted down to the deck with a fairly small number of fairly small cap screws loaded solely in tension, and an undisclosed backing plate or some such under the deck, which may be cored at that point... who knows?

Mine, which I feel to be stronger, is part of a fitting that not only stretches from gunnel to gunnel, but also down the stem and along the sides of the hull, with several large cap screws in shear in addition to several more large cap screws through the deck and a thick backing plate under the deck. Said backing plate extends back to add support for the windlass. The stem itself is a massive chunk of hardwood, heavily glassed inside and out, so the mounting bolts have something substantial to hold on to.

And yes, seems to me that since the whole assembly is designed to absorb the rig loads that it is indeed "even better" as a platform for the anchor roller. All of this is attached to a boat that is several tonnes lighter than an equivalent length BenniHuntalina which likely reduces the maximum stresses placed on the roller.

You may feel that these are unimportant differences... I don't!

Cheers,

Jim
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Old 28-07-2013, 15:57   #395
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Re: Modern Production Cruisers at Sea

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But then I've no real axe to grind... fat ass... pointy ass... mono.. cat... tri... unlike you I don't give a gnats turd....
Its a boat..... PLAYTIME....

Isn't this what the thread was really about, ass? if you don't know go read the original post.

Phil has it right, ass is all good and somethings different asses are fun, so chose which ass you like the most even though not all asses works as well at times.
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Old 28-07-2013, 16:45   #396
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Re: Modern Production Cruisers at Sea

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My whole boat is a luxury. Most of us don't need the "optimum" boat, and in any case your optimum boat might be completely different than my optimum boat.

For what it's worth, my canoe-stern boat has more stowage space than many similar-size more modern designs. I have less elbow room down below, which can be a good thing, but probably more lockers.

To continue the honesty, the aft cabin on my boat is microscopic compared to a modern Beneteau (etc). It sleeps one comfortably, but it's a good thing that my wife and I like each other -- it's really cramped for two. The canoe stern, and moderately low freeboard (compared to some, anyway) do take their toll on interior space.
Tell me about it.

I LOVE your boat, but can't afford it. If I were to get a PSC, I'd have to settle for a 37, or maybe even a 34. Then I'd be getting into the too small for our needs range, just because I like the boat so much.

This is probably why I'm still boatless.
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Old 28-07-2013, 16:47   #397
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Re: Modern Production Cruisers at Sea

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Originally Posted by Don L View Post
Isn't this what the thread was really about, ass? if you don't know go read the original post.

Phil has it right, ass is all good and somethings different asses are fun, so chose which ass you like the most even though not all asses works as well at times.
My ass looks like someone pinched it real hard...
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Old 28-07-2013, 17:09   #398
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Re: Modern Production Cruisers at Sea

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Originally Posted by letsgetsailing3 View Post
Tell me about it.

I LOVE your boat, but can't afford it. If I were to get a PSC, I'd have to settle for a 37, or maybe even a 34. Then I'd be getting into the too small for our needs range, just because I like the boat so much.

This is probably why I'm still boatless.
We are in the process of selling our current boat and a PSC 40 or 44 is at the top of our list for the "final" boat. We have looked at a few 37's but the microscopic galley and lack of a separate shower are not live aboard friendly enough for us.
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Old 28-07-2013, 17:19   #399
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Re: Modern Production Cruisers at Sea

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Originally Posted by letsgetsailing3 View Post
Tell me about it.

I LOVE your boat, but can't afford it. If I were to get a PSC, I'd have to settle for a 37, or maybe even a 34. Then I'd be getting into the too small for our needs range, just because I like the boat so much.

This is probably why I'm still boatless.
You should buy something now that you could afford and get out there. You could be learning so much now. Actually, getting something less than you can afford is even better. If you treat it somewhat rough by running aground, hitting docks etc it's better your old boat than the boat of your dreams.


You should be able to find a good ole full keel boat that can handle anything you can throw at it for anywhere from $2,000 - $10,000.
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Old 29-07-2013, 01:34   #400
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Re: Modern Production Cruisers at Sea

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Originally Posted by savoir View Post
2. The anchor fitting was one of those bolt on/off thingies that racers use. That would be OK for the once a year family cruise but as a full time fitting I reckon it isn't strong enough.
There are some very expensive scandinavian yachts out there that don't have any anchor fitting at all... It all depends how you use your boat. If you mainly cruise in Europe you're unlikely to ever ride out a storm behind your anchor.
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Old 29-07-2013, 01:43   #401
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Re: Modern Production Cruisers at Sea

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Originally Posted by letsgetsailing3 View Post
Tell me about it.

I LOVE your boat, but can't afford it. If I were to get a PSC, I'd have to settle for a 37, or maybe even a 34. Then I'd be getting into the too small for our needs range, just because I like the boat so much.

This is probably why I'm still boatless.
Get a boat. "Good enough is perfect."

As for the PSC 37 or 34, We are friends with a couple who live aboard their PSC 34. We met them when they were racing it to Hawaii, doublehanded, in the 2008 Pacific cup. It's small, but they make it work. The 37 is also a sweet boat. I've crewed aboard one in the south Pacific, and it's definitely tight for a crew of four. Or three.

Anyway, do find something that works for you. You can find something to love about most boats.
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Old 29-07-2013, 05:07   #402
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Re: Modern Production Cruisers at Sea

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You should buy something now that you could afford and get out there. You could be learning so much now. Actually, getting something less than you can afford is even better. If you treat it somewhat rough by running aground, hitting docks etc it's better your old boat than the boat of your dreams.


You should be able to find a good ole full keel boat that can handle anything you can throw at it for anywhere from $2,000 - $10,000.
Example:

1984 Cape Dory 25D sailboat for sale in New York

Sailboat data Cape Dory 25D:

CAPE DORY 25D sailboat specifications and details on sailboatdata.com
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Old 29-07-2013, 05:49   #403
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Originally Posted by K_V_B View Post
If you mainly cruise in Europe you're unlikely to ever ride out a storm behind your anchor.
ROFL...... speak for yourself... there's some who dislike marinas and sail anchorage to anchorage... get outa the marina sometime and take a look...
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Old 29-07-2013, 06:11   #404
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Re: Modern Production Cruisers at Sea

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......If you mainly cruise in Europe you're unlikely to ever ride out a storm behind your anchor.
Huh?
We have ridden out every single storm in the last six years at anchor in the Med! (there have been six)
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Old 29-07-2013, 06:43   #405
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There are some very expensive scandinavian yachts out there that don't have any anchor fitting at all... It all depends how you use your boat. If you mainly cruise in Europe you're unlikely to ever ride out a storm behind your anchor.
I found it hard to believe but.... my old man told me that he came into the Marquesas and met a boat from California that used their anchor for the first time ever. Apparently they always used a marina until they left. Never had anchored.
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