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Old 14-10-2015, 07:51   #31
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Re: Hello All

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Originally Posted by jangann View Post
These exact boats from Ebay (these seem like Ebay boats)? Or these models?

I would caution against buying a big, first boat like this from Ebay. I would prefer you not be pressured by the time and bidding, that you look at a lot of boats (like a dozen) in person, and that you make sure you have a good survey done on a big boat like this. Surveyors will help you understand a boat and tell you if it's a bad deal. If it were a little boat, I'd be less wary of Ebay, or if you had experience. Any big, or expensive, boat you need to make an offer on contingent on a successful survey and seatrial, and that's hard to do on Ebay, for a newbie anyways.

Both of these models are nice boats. Tons of people have cruised on Tartans. But you want to think about what you are looking for in a boat. Tartans are fast and nimble, but not built for heavy seas or big weather. I would be very happy to have one if I were coastal cruising, but not going offshore. I feel the same way about a Ranger. Also, the Tartan might have a centerboard (google it if you don't know what that is). That might be good for you if you were going to the Bahamas for example, but you might not like them (I don't, I had one that broke endlessly). Something else to consider is that a Tartan 37 is way harder to get into a slip (a dock) than a smaller Ranger; big boats have a lot of inertia when approaching solid objects (like docks or other boats, like mine), so can take a lot of experience to dock successfully. If you want to be on a dock, the smaller Ranger might be better.

Here's a better question for you to ask: Where do you want to go? Where do you foresee yourself spending time? The Great Lakes? The Bahamas? The South Pacific? A Great Circle trip around the east coast of the N. America? Tell us that and we might be able to evaluate the suitability of these model boat.

All that being said, I still advocate for getting a smaller boat to start with. Catalina 27, Pearson 28, Hunter 25-28 . . . etc. Great for getting out as a beginner, learning, gaining experience. And you could do more than that in a small boat -- any of these could do the Bahamas, for example. Small is not bad.

Good luck.
thanks for the info, and.. those boats, living 2 aboard? and im looking to go back and forth from canada to bahamas.. at least at first then later (maybe after another boat) id like to make other trips but start with these as "for sure's" with the first boat. doable with what you mention?

the two boats i linked above are local for me. so would not go through ebay.

and theres another one i was curious about.

1972 Sparkman & Stephens Sloop
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Old 14-10-2015, 08:38   #32
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Re: Hello All

It's hard to tell much from just a picture. What size is it? Draft (depth)?
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Old 14-10-2015, 09:00   #33
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Re: Hello All

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeOur3rd View Post
thanks for the info, and.. those boats, living 2 aboard? and im looking to go back and forth from canada to bahamas.. at least at first then later (maybe after another boat) id like to make other trips but start with these as "for sure's" with the first boat. doable with what you mention?

the two boats i linked above are local for me. so would not go through ebay.

and theres another one i was curious about.

1972 Sparkman & Stephens Sloop
Interesting, I have walked by that boat a number of times. It is in Wilmington, CA. It looks good in the photo but it has been left to rot apparently for a number of years.
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Old 14-10-2015, 09:51   #34
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Re: Hello All

BeOurThird, I admire your drive to achieve the dream of a cruising life. I got into this in a much different way than you. Forty-seven years ago we started with a sunfish type boat and made every mistake we could, learning along the way through a series of bigger boats. For the past 15 years we've owned a 42 foot Tayana (a very well made blue water boat) which we've lived on for 3 years so far.

What I can advise you about boat selection from my experience is that knowing what you want to do with the boat and selecting accordingly is most important. The value of the initial build quality can't be overstated nor can low quality be overcome.

With any used boat, how it has been maintained and updated is crucial to its value for your purpose. Unless you want a project to spend years restoring you want a boat that has been very well maintained. A professional survey is a necessary step since you have limited experience so far.

Since you wish to keep expenses down you will need to be able to do as much of your own maintenance as possible. That's okay, you will learn as you do it. It is important to consider when buying if can you get at the things you will have to learn to deal with. What is access like to the engine, tanks, water pump, bilge pump(s), through hulls, electrical panel and wiring runs, the underside of deck fittings and stanchions? It can be tough to learn to service a diesel if you can't see or reach it.

It sounds as though you know what you want to do and you have the drive to do it. That is good. There is a lot to learn and much of it simply takes time and experience. If you keep a good attitude and keep open to learning I'm sure you will achieve what you set out to do.




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Old 14-10-2015, 09:59   #35
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Re: Hello All

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Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
Interesting, I have walked by that boat a number of times. It is in Wilmington, CA. It looks good in the photo but it has been left to rot apparently for a number of years.
thanks much! i wondered why it was so cheap! like 19000

and.. im showing the boatst mostly asking what the models/companies are like. since i dont know. the comment from someone else above telling me to avoid the two boats because they are not deep sea boats.. that was exactly what i wanted as i didnt know!


anyone know anything about Beneteau Cyclades ?

theres a 39 foot that looks ok.

if i was going to buy a 40" catamaran or the above what's easier to learn on? or is that totally subjective?
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Old 14-10-2015, 10:00   #36
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Re: Hello All

Here's another resource. Infinite possibilities all over the country:

Sailboat Listings - sailboats for sale
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Old 14-10-2015, 12:09   #37
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Re: Hello All

BO3, it took me 4 years to go through the process you are just starting -- from complete naive wannabee to boat owner. You're bolder than I to be asking these kinds of questions and the posters have been incredibly patient with you. Here's my suggestion: write down what you think you want in a boat and why. Then go look at boats that have these criteria. Start looking local even if you don't really like that particular boat because it will save you travel expenses and help you narrow down your choices. You might think you like a boat on paper, but once you step aboard, it becomes a different thing (not much different than online dating....to keep the 'picking a wife' metaphor going). Every time I looked at a boat, I researched everything I could find online to get a sense of its attributes and weaknesses. Unfortunately, there really aren't any books on this. I once posted on another site a list of 6 very different boats that I was considering when I had finally gotten close to choosing, but the responses were still not very helpful. Once you get down to The (potential) One, then you might get some very specific info, but truthfully, Google is going to be your best friend right now.

Welcome and good luck!
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Old 14-10-2015, 16:02   #38
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Re: Hello All

ive been looking at several people who never had sailed and bought 43+ feet boats, i wonder why they managed fine?

also ive done what you suggest, my list at the start did have my few requirements i felt i wanted, but now i realize there is more. we plan on raising a family on the boat for the first few years at the very least. if not until we drop dead ;] so.. this is why i wanted bigger. and my funds being limited made me not want to . get a 23 food long.. upgrade..and upgrade..and upgrade. thats wasted funds to my limited budget.

so im not sure what to do. i see what you all have said but.. i cant afford the 10 years of process if im going to change my lifestyle it has to just be done.
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Old 14-10-2015, 16:03   #39
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Re: Hello All

Quote:
Originally Posted by OldFrog75 View Post
Here's another resource. Infinite possibilities all over the country:

Sailboat Listings - sailboats for sale
canadian ;]
and..i did go through that ENTIRE list hehe
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Old 14-10-2015, 16:10   #40
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Re: Hello All

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Originally Posted by BeOur3rd View Post
we plan on raising a family on the boat for the first few years at the very least. if not until we drop dead ;] so.. this is why i wanted bigger. and my funds being limited made me not want to . get a 23 food long.. upgrade..and upgrade..and upgrade. thats wasted funds to my limited budget.
Raising a family? Catamaran might be best.

SailMakai | Mears Family Adventures
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Old 14-10-2015, 16:16   #41
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Re: Hello All

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeOur3rd View Post
ive been looking at several people who never had sailed and bought 43+ feet boats, i wonder why they managed fine?

also ive done what you suggest, my list at the start did have my few requirements i felt i wanted, but now i realize there is more. we plan on raising a family on the boat for the first few years at the very least. if not until we drop dead ;] so.. this is why i wanted bigger. and my funds being limited made me not want to . get a 23 food long.. upgrade..and upgrade..and upgrade. thats wasted funds to my limited budget.

so im not sure what to do. i see what you all have said but.. i cant afford the 10 years of process if im going to change my lifestyle it has to just be done.
So there is actually, to me, a big difference between a 40 foot boat and a 50 foot boat, much more than a mere 10 feet might suggest. I could see you getting a good 40 to maybe 45 foot boat and that can be handled by two people who know what to do if it is set up for that. Hans Christian 43 and Westsail 42 are heavy and sturdy and sea-worthy examples of "bluewater" boat designs, just not very fast, especially in light winds. But if you have a nice, big, fairly new (or brand new is better) diesel in there you can get around quite nicely if it is not windy enough. Again, the more you know about what you want, and it is realistic, the more we can help you. I can see you like to learn by doing so I am suggesting here boats that are well-known for keeping their owners safe as they learn.
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Old 14-10-2015, 17:01   #42
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Re: Hello All

Quote:
Originally Posted by OldFrog75 View Post
Raising a family? Catamaran might be best.

SailMakai | Mears Family Adventures
hehe yes my page is full of catamarans right now.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
So there is actually, to me, a big difference between a 40 foot boat and a 50 foot boat, much more than a mere 10 feet might suggest. I could see you getting a good 40 to maybe 45 foot boat and that can be handled by two people who know what to do if it is set up for that. Hans Christian 43 and Westsail 42 are heavy and sturdy and sea-worthy examples of "bluewater" boat designs, just not very fast, especially in light winds. But if you have a nice, big, fairly new (or brand new is better) diesel in there you can get around quite nicely if it is not windy enough. Again, the more you know about what you want, and it is realistic, the more we can help you. I can see you like to learn by doing so I am suggesting here boats that are well-known for keeping their owners safe as they learn.
i was looking at a 40 foot catamaran, it's odd ive basically come back exactly to what i wanted from the start
and id rather have something that sails easy, i honestly see myself not even using the diesel if i dont have to. (what does that say about the boats you mentioned? still good? should i look into them?)
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Old 14-10-2015, 19:52   #43
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Re: Hello All

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeOur3rd View Post
ive been looking at several people who never had sailed and bought 43+ feet boats, i wonder why they managed fine?

also ive done what you suggest, my list at the start did have my few requirements i felt i wanted, but now i realize there is more. we plan on raising a family on the boat for the first few years at the very least. if not until we drop dead ;] so.. this is why i wanted bigger. and my funds being limited made me not want to . get a 23 food long.. upgrade..and upgrade..and upgrade. thats wasted funds to my limited budget.

so im not sure what to do. i see what you all have said but.. i cant afford the 10 years of process if im going to change my lifestyle it has to just be done.
Well I admit I skipped some of this thread but if anyone said it can't be done in less than ten years I disagree. I started with zero knowledge and experience and caught the cruising bug. I completely immersed myself in boating. I read everything I could find about boats and boating, starting with the basics and working my way up as I gained knowledge. Just over a year later I took off on a 36' boat and spent the next two years cruising the Caribbean and US east coast. Certainly I made some mistakes but managed to have a lot of fun and made it home alive and in one piece.

So it can be done if you have the will and dedication and a reasonable level of intelligence. I would say give it a try but don't jump into the deep end of the pool until you can at least tread water.

If I may offer a mild criticism with the sincere wish that it will help you achieve you dream, it just seems to me you're trying to run before you walk. Not saying spend ten years taking baby steps but just back up a little and do some study on your own to learn the basics and then start working towards the big goal.

I have seen a number of good books recommended. I mentioned a couple in one of my first replies. Log on to Amazon, buy a couple and get going. Never too soon to get started with the plan.
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Old 14-10-2015, 22:26   #44
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Re: Hello All

Considering you are planning a family...might I suggest that you look up the blog sailingtotem.com it is a young family of five sailing with three kids, the choice of boat they made and why and much more. Worth a look.


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Old 15-10-2015, 03:29   #45
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Re: Hello All

Hi, from my own experience, it is not the size of the boat that matters but how many fit crew you have. You see, once you are away from your berth, only one person can steer the boat at any given time. 1000ft tankers only have one person steering the boat. It is good to have another keeping watch. Where the problem comes is when you need to moor the boat. Tide drift and wind can cause you havoc unless you have others to take care of your mooring ropes, even in a marina. Of course there are old salts who will laugh at my remarks and believe me I envy them their skill, a skill that can only come with time and practise . Whatever size you decide to buy, get a few mates onboard as often as possible and practise, reduce the number of crew until you can moor with confidence with just the two of you. Good luck and happy sailing. PS: Reading is fine and should be done when you are not sailing, but it is no substitute for 'Hands On' experience.
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