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Old 13-04-2010, 16:28   #31
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Originally Posted by RCErickson View Post
I am a live aboard so I also have some insight. First, what makes the perfect live aboard is different for everyone........... I installed a shore water connect...... This is ultimately necessary for me as I take long showers........ Most Refrigerators made for sail boats are not very good as live aboards. Consider installing a real Frig...... Also consider installing an on demand hot water heater as the tanks on most boats is to small...... I recommend having a couch........ Do not spend money on a Generator if you are not planning to cruise, since your in the slip most of the time........... So many options. Good Luck.
'good advice here if your plans are to liveaboard at a dock, but this is all contrary to the needs of liveaboard cruisers that do best with solar panels, wind generators, diesel generators, big tankage, AC refrigeration/freezer, and water conserving bathing. We've been living aboard snce 1972 without anything similar to this quoted plan. it's a good plan, but not for all. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
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Old 13-04-2010, 16:35   #32
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My wife and I lived aboard a very roomy 46 foot monohull for 5 years off shore and at the dock through Canadian winters and Caribbean summers. We currently own a 46 foot catamaran.

MY O' MY WHAT A DIFFERENCE!
There is no comparison as far as livability both at the dock and off shore.

PROS: SPACE! There are cabins and lockers that I have'nt seen for weeks.
CONS: Hard to find a place to park it.
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Old 13-04-2010, 17:30   #33
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I live aboard my Columbia 41. It was built in 1974 and spent at least half it's life on the hardstand. The asking price was $25k because the seller had female problems. There was a Morgan O.I. 41 nearby and the asking price for that boat was $35k. I think you can find an older and larger boat for something in that range...if you don't mind doing a lot of bilge cleaning.
I don't think you will be happy in a boat less than 40 feet in length. You may have things you just can't leave behind like family photos, favorite books, etc.
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Old 13-04-2010, 18:46   #34
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Its a cat

I am currently planning for a vessel for my retirement and there is no question it has to be a catamaran.

Based in Queensland, Australia I intend to explore and dive without haste the GBR, Coral Sea. PNG, Pacific.

Most sailers particually monohulls miss out on the Great anchorages and Atolls of Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea.

There are cataramans designs available today with the load carrying for extended cruising once you get to 45ft. 40ft would be borderline to carry required fuel, all chain rode, Gen, scuba compressor, etc for long term crusing. My research on crusing blogs shows many trips compromised by supplies of fuel and facilitied for refueling(jerrycans everywhere- simply inadequate fuel capacity).

Indeed there are catamarans available without load carrying but there are new designs available that have load carrying without compromising speed debunking that myth. Not that was ever an issue with the St Francis 50 as an example of an older design. There are 45 ft vessels that will carry loads.

Some real advantages for me.

Shallow draft.

Great dive platform and access from cockpit. Can position right at dive sites and dive straight off stern.

Great access for managing a good RIB infltable tender. A minute or two to deploy !!

All normal advantages of a cat over 40 ft. Great cockpit, saloon , Owners hull, queensize beds, roomy showers/room for two, etc.

Not climbing down into saloon. In most designs the galley, saloon, cockpit are just extensions of the space.

When quests are aboard you still have your own private space/hull.

In Aust marinas cater better for catamarans although a a cost.

For me it is no question it is a cat. Its all about the destination.

No doubt a monofull would be cheaper and be suitable for many but for me what floats my boat is a catamaran. Your choice.
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Old 13-04-2010, 20:58   #35
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Quote:
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'good advice here if your plans are to liveaboard at a dock, but this is all contrary to the needs of liveaboard cruisers that do best with solar panels, wind generators, diesel generators, big tankage, AC refrigeration/freezer, and water conserving bathing. We've been living aboard snce 1972 without anything similar to this quoted plan. it's a good plan, but not for all. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew

I totally agree with CaptForce if you plan to be a live aboard cruiser. I am not, obviously, just a day sailer who lives on his boat. There is a couple down the dock who never leave the dock and have all the cruising equipment as noted above. They must fill their tanks and use shore restrooms. Not my idea of an enjoyable living arrangement, but they have lived this way for years and are quite happy. I really am not interested in camping on my boat so I have taken a different approach. However, I do agree that it all depends on what you want to do. If your goal is cruising you need generators, solar panels, large tanks, etc. If your goal is to live on your boat in comfort but not cruise you probably do not. Your choice. Good Luck.
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Old 13-04-2010, 23:05   #36
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Three interior arrangements (other than mine) that I consider really liveable can be found on the Ackerman Newporter 40, Bil Gardens' Island Trader 38 and his Gulf Pilot House 32 .
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Old 21-10-2010, 02:24   #37
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I have lived on many boats from 27' to 52í all I can say is the best was my Irwin 52 by a huge margin! But there are many a boat out there that would be nicer or worse, given the choice it would be an Oyster but I donít make that kind of money.
Good question though it brings out a lot of discourse and differing ideas.
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Old 12-10-2011, 18:26   #38
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Re: Best Liveaboard

I think you should be sure to check out an irwin 52 when comparing. they're afordable roomy.
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Old 13-10-2011, 07:24   #39
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Re: Best Liveaboard

Bigger isn't always best. Hard to find a slip for a liveaboard cat and mono's over 50' and when found, pricey. Living on the hook might be an option for some but has it's downsides as well. Most liveaboards I've seen are between 35-45' (might be a good polling question). Cheaper to have a smaller boat and rent an apartment or have a small mortgage. Either way it'll take away from the whole idea of the liveaboard lifestyle.
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Old 14-10-2011, 09:57   #40
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I was in a Prout 45 (catamaran) at the dock recently (in 40 kt winds) and I found just as much if not more motion than on my monohull. It was actually more disconcerting because the motion was more of an earthquake-like sloshing motion rather than a heeling over.
Catamarans have high initial stability due to their width, so there is very little rolling motion. What you do get in a cat is a lot of yawing motion. Yaw the rotation around the imaginary central vertical axis (a flat, spinning motion). It is much more noticeable on a cat because rolling is less. Yawing usually happens suddenly with a kind of jerky motion that always seems to catch you off guard, causing you to stumble about. I find it to be the most unfavourable motion to deal with.
As for space, for a given length, cats win hands down. Most cats have a beam equal to about half their length. So, finding suitable docking space in a crowded marina may be a challenge sometimes, especially with the growing popularity of cats in recent years. The question is how much space do you need. I think that if you are a 'pack rat' you shouldn't be sailing. Experienced sailors know how to cut out all the non-essentials and how to conserve the essentials like their water supply. There are all sorts of gizmos you can purchase but many are not essential, so don't fall into the trap of buying a lot of them and end up with a boat that is heavily laden with gear. Pick and choose your gear prudently and you will be able to get by just fine with a monohull in the 35 to 50 foot range. Personally, I like Morris Yachts, Nauticats and the Pacific Seacraft Crealock 37 or 44 as good live aboard choices.
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Old 14-10-2011, 10:08   #41
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Re: Best Liveaboard

live aboard boats---irwin is good for that-- many here-- they dont ever leave dock, the locals have told me. after sailing one i know why they dont...... excellent room inside for living, however. but the 52 can accommodate a washer/dryer. i remember that being the selling point at a boat show some years ago----
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Old 19-10-2011, 05:48   #42
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Here is another good choice for living aboard/extended passages: The Cape George 40. It doesn't get much better than this, in a forty-footer!

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Old 19-10-2011, 06:14   #43
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Re: Best Liveaboard

Once you've had a sailboat with a washer/dryer you'll never go back regardless what the rest of the marina thinks. Size does count.
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Old 19-10-2011, 12:42   #44
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To each his own, I suppose. But as zeehag has pointed out in his posting above, most of these boats never leave the marina and they are like big bathtubs that don't sail very well, in most cases. I am a purist. If I am going to spend big bucks on a sailboat, it better be a good sailer.
Besides, if you are at a marina, there are usually laundromats on site anyway, which makes having a washer/dryer on your boat redundant. However, if you are at sea, running a washer/dryer requires a lot of electricity and water. It also takes up a lot of valuable space. Fine if you're on a big mega-yacht but I wouldn't want it on a 40 footer.

I think the Cape George 40 has all of the finest qualities of a true sailboat. The layout of the deck and the interior are as near perfect as you can get. Take a closer look. Also, they are built on a semi-custom basis, so the interior arrangement can be altered to suit the owner's needs, within reason of course.
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Old 19-10-2011, 14:44   #45
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Re: Best Liveaboard

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Besides, if you are at a marina, there are usually laundromats on site anyway, which makes having a washer/dryer on your boat redundant.
I agree, if you're living on a boat condo, walk up to the amenities. Then again, why own a boat if you're always tied up to the dock? You can do the laundry in your home and you don't have to use an outhouse.

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However, if you are at sea, running a washer/dryer requires a lot of electricity and water. It also takes up a lot of valuable space. Fine if you're on a big mega-yacht but I wouldn't want it on a 40 footer.
Valuable space? Electricity? Water? We live in the 21st century get over it. If I can use a little technology to make our life on the water as comfortable as possible, h€ll yes. I can't begin to tell you how nice it is to get a warmed blanket or jacket when on the midnight watch along with a nice thermos of freshly ground and brewed coffee. We're not the Pardy's who're minimalists and don't even have an engine. We're experienced and can get by with almost nothing; but why would we want to do that and not really enjoy our trips?
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