Cruisers Forum
 


Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on Cruisers Forums. Advertise Here
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 03-08-2022, 04:36   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: N.Ireland
Boat: Moody 425 12.7m
Posts: 16
Gas v Electric Galley

Having just changed to a motor yacht with a non compliant Gas Cooker that has to be replaced, I'd be interested in comment. In an overall situation where cooking is at a minimum by partial live-aboards whose intention is to be always pugged in to 220 volt supply, what is there to consider to changing to the Electric alternative, taking it that installation requirements have been researched.
Ipapadi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 05:04   #2
Moderator
 
tkeithlu's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Carrabelle, Florida
Boat: Fiberglas shattering 44' steel trawler
Posts: 5,436
Re: Gas v Electric

If you've got reliable 220 VAC, electric cooking is a quite reasonable choice. It avoids problems with propane - storage, connections, and the inconvenient fact that the stuff is more dense than air and accumulates in the bilge if leaked. Propane is a more attractive choice if your electrical energy is limited. It also has the advantage of more intense heat faster, which some cooks (we're included} prefer.
__________________
Never let anything mechanical know that you are in a hurry.
tkeithlu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 05:09   #3
Registered User
 
GILow's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: On the boat, somewhere in Australia.
Boat: Swanson 42 & Kelly Peterson 44
Posts: 8,411
Re: Gas v Electric

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ipapadi View Post
Having just changed to a motor yacht with a non compliant Gas Cooker that has to be replaced, I'd be interested in comment. In an overall situation where cooking is at a minimum by partial live-aboards whose intention is to be always pugged in to 220 volt supply, what is there to consider to changing to the Electric alternative, taking it that installation requirements have been researched.


Not much downside and a lot of upside, if I didn’t intend to spend 90% of my time at anchor I would do the same.

Induction is the way to go of course, and, depending on how much space you have you might want to go with a convection microwave instead of a conventional electric oven.
__________________
Refitting… again.
GILow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 05:20   #4
Registered User
 
ranger58sb's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Maryland, USA
Boat: 58' Sedan Bridge
Posts: 4,972
Re: Gas v Electric

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ipapadi View Post
Having just changed to a motor yacht with a non compliant Gas Cooker that has to be replaced, I'd be interested in comment. In an overall situation where cooking is at a minimum by partial live-aboards whose intention is to be always pugged in to 220 volt supply, what is there to consider to changing to the Electric alternative, taking it that installation requirements have been researched.
Not much to consider, in our experience.

Combo microwave/convection oven/air fryer plus an electric cooktop... works well for us. Works well at anchor too; we have a generator and I'm not afraid to use it. (And besides, we need to heat water and charge batteries approx 2x/day at anchor anyway.)

I'll probably change the cooktop to induction when I get a round tuit.

-Chris
__________________
Chesapeake Bay, USA.
ranger58sb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 05:26   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2008
Boat: Trident marine Voyager 30
Posts: 611
Re: Gas v Electric

I would love to have a electric oven but I will never cook on a electric hob.
Anders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 05:35   #6
Registered User
 
GILow's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: On the boat, somewhere in Australia.
Boat: Swanson 42 & Kelly Peterson 44
Posts: 8,411
Re: Gas v Electric

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anders View Post
I would love to have a electric oven but I will never cook on a electric hob.


As an ex professional cook I understand how you feel, but induction has been a game changer. Yes, I still think gas is better, but only just. It’s not like the bad old days of hopelessly slow temperature changes. The induction stuff responds very well.
__________________
Refitting… again.
GILow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 05:38   #7
Do… or do not
 
s/v Jedi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: in paradise
Boat: Sundeer 64
Posts: 13,718
Re: Gas v Electric

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anders View Post
I would love to have a electric oven but I will never cook on a electric hob.
Well… I would when it would be all that’s available but yes, a standard electric cooktop is not so nice.

That said, induction is perfect. It brings more heat faster when needed, goes back to OFF as quick as gas and can go to low and slow levels better than gas. It’s also twice as efficient as gas.

Our induction cooktops and convection oven are a game changer in life aboard, but it only became that after going big on solar and lithium iron phosphate batteries.
__________________
May the Force be with you!

s/v Jedi is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 05:49   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Boat: Hunnter Legend 37.5
Posts: 901
Re: Gas v Electric

I use a single burner induction hob at anchor and it's great! Heats the eggs in about 5 minutes, cooks the fish in about 10 minutes and doesn't heat the cabin at all! I use a 2 quart water boiler to make the French press coffee in about 8 minutes.

It's been a game changer for me, and this on 210 ah battery bank with one 330W solar panel at 12 volts.

Ben
bensolomon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 07:12   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Sozopol
Boat: Riva 48
Posts: 1,242
Re: Gas v Electric

When I switched from sail to power, I went electric (vs. alcohol on the sailboat). If you have a generator go all electric (water heater, icemaker, coffee machine, stove, oven, microwave and even the grill on the flybridge). You can use mostly household appliances (way less expensive), the boat feels more like a house and it is more convenient.

You need to setup an inverter where you can make coffee/tea, warm up food in the microwave, etc. without waking up everyone on the boat by starting the generator. Induction is also very power efficient. We had a discussion a couple years back that open flame heat transfer is 20-25% efficient, induction was 55-55%, microwave was 75% and I think pressure cookers were at 80%. This is relevant for long range cruising, i.e. how much fuel/gas you need to carry. Not important on a powerboat. Electric makes everything simpler and prettier.
Pizzazz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 11:41   #10
Registered User
 
GILow's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: On the boat, somewhere in Australia.
Boat: Swanson 42 & Kelly Peterson 44
Posts: 8,411
Re: Gas v Electric

Quote:
Originally Posted by s/v Jedi View Post
…but it only became that after going big on solar and lithium iron phosphate batteries.

How much solar do you think you need to go all-electric cooking? I would love to get rid of the gas cooktop for the new boat. (Assuming no generator here.)
__________________
Refitting… again.
GILow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 11:45   #11
Do… or do not
 
s/v Jedi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: in paradise
Boat: Sundeer 64
Posts: 13,718
Re: Gas v Electric

Quote:
Originally Posted by GILow View Post
How much solar do you think you need to go all-electric cooking? I would love to get rid of the gas cooktop for the new boat. (Assuming no generator here.)
We have 1,875W LG panels (record has been 2,200W output). We also run the watermaker and even some A/C so maybe 1,600W would be enough (4 big panels instead of the 5 we have).

I’m thinking about sliding arrays that “park” while underway and deploy at anchor, but I don’t think I need more capacity
__________________
May the Force be with you!

s/v Jedi is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 12:41   #12
Registered User
 
GILow's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: On the boat, somewhere in Australia.
Boat: Swanson 42 & Kelly Peterson 44
Posts: 8,411
Re: Gas v Electric

Quote:
Originally Posted by s/v Jedi View Post
We have 1,875W LG panels (record has been 2,200W output). We also run the watermaker and even some A/C so maybe 1,600W would be enough (4 big panels instead of the 5 we have).



I’m thinking about sliding arrays that “park” while underway and deploy at anchor, but I don’t think I need more capacity

Thanks mate, those are useful numbers. I don’t have AC, which would have to be the big one in those power draws. My pair of Pursurvivor 35s don’t tax things much either.

It tends to suggest that if I can fit the 1500 Watts I believe is possible then induction cooking would be feasible.

My only concern is that I’m trying to keep the panels central on the boat for weight and simplicity, which is not the most efficient place for them.

One more question please, what battery capacity?
__________________
Refitting… again.
GILow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 12:55   #13
Do… or do not
 
s/v Jedi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: in paradise
Boat: Sundeer 64
Posts: 13,718
Re: Gas v Electric

Quote:
Originally Posted by GILow View Post
Thanks mate, those are useful numbers. I don’t have AC, which would have to be the big one in those power draws. My pair of Pursurvivor 35s don’t tax things much either.

It tends to suggest that if I can fit the 1500 Watts I believe is possible then induction cooking would be feasible.

My only concern is that I’m trying to keep the panels central on the boat for weight and simplicity, which is not the most efficient place for them.

One more question please, what battery capacity?
For an electric galley, you need 5kVA inverter capacity and 10kWh battery. I have 2x Multiplus 3000 so 6kVA and two times 10kWh batteries, although one is still AGM so less available. You can do with one battery, even when you have a cloudy day now and then, but after two cloudy days it will go low and won’t do a 3rd day without solar.

The good panels are big, think 2m x 1m. You need 4 or 5 of them. If you have dinghy davits, you can probably fit 3 above the dinghy, like we did. We have a 16’ beam and I wouldn’t want to go wider with the array (which is 10’ wide)
__________________
May the Force be with you!

s/v Jedi is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 13:45   #14
Registered User
 
GILow's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: On the boat, somewhere in Australia.
Boat: Swanson 42 & Kelly Peterson 44
Posts: 8,411
Re: Gas v Electric

Quote:
Originally Posted by s/v Jedi View Post
For an electric galley, you need 5kVA inverter capacity and 10kWh battery. I have 2x Multiplus 3000 so 6kVA and two times 10kWh batteries, although one is still AGM so less available. You can do with one battery, even when you have a cloudy day now and then, but after two cloudy days it will go low and won’t do a 3rd day without solar.



The good panels are big, think 2m x 1m. You need 4 or 5 of them. If you have dinghy davits, you can probably fit 3 above the dinghy, like we did. We have a 16’ beam and I wouldn’t want to go wider with the array (which is 10’ wide)


All great data points, thank you.
__________________
Refitting… again.
GILow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2022, 15:15   #15
Registered User

Join Date: May 2022
Posts: 248
Re: Gas v Electric

My thoughts....

https://fetchinketch.net/boat_though...ic-or-propane/

Electric can be nice, but it is an expensive install, and expensive to run. As far as I know there is only one gimbaled induction cooktop suitable for use underway, and it is insanely expensive.

Using an electric cooker WILL increase your fuel budget by a good bit. Propane is very cheap.

Propane has risks, but so does electricity, especially the high current DC flows that are needed to power an inverter. Don't fool yourself, high current DC causes more fires than propane. Both are very safe when properly maintained. Both will kill you if treated cavalierly.
ItDepends is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
electric

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Aft galley or inline galley? 40 South Monohull Sailboats 8 25-04-2014 09:04
Multihull Galley Up or Galley Down Cotemar Multihull Sailboats 37 05-01-2014 07:16
Want To Buy: 3 Burner Propane Galley Stove or Galley Maid parts Dougpad Classifieds Archive 1 26-02-2012 19:41
Galley Up - Galley Down shipofools Multihull Sailboats 32 27-07-2010 14:05

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:48.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.