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Old 07-12-2007, 01:51   #1
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little pressure cookers

Hey folks. We've got a "typical" pressure cooker. I forget the model at the moment, and am too lazy to get out of the berth and check! The problem is it's too big for normal use, because it doesn't fit in a boat sink.

Looking for a small pressure cooker, and I came across this guy:

The Galleyware Company

Anyone have any experience or any other ideas in regards to small pressure cookers? Ideally I'd like to be able to have it double as a regular pot sans the top. We've got some galleyware cups, and stainless goblets. I think our plates are made by them too. Nothing but compliments so far on that front.
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Old 07-12-2007, 03:19   #2
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According to Miss Vickie* Miss Vickie's Pressure Cooker Recipes
* The Internet's only encyclopedia for everything related to pressure cooking!
I highly recommend this website for all sorts of pressure cooking information.

Specifically:
Library Section

Buy a large size, remember you can only utilize 2/3 of the actual volume of the pot, or 1/2 in the case of cooking dried beans. Five quarts is the minimal useful size, even for singles and couples if you intend to get the most out of your cooker. An 8 quart model if the most useful, giving you the option to cook large roasts, whole chickens, beef ribs, turkey breasts, etc. The larger size is not just for family sized meals, even singles and couples will benefit from preparing foods in larger quantities to freeze for quick meals later on.
The larger models also make it easier to fit inside the various accessories like pans, dishes, bowls, pots and such that will extend the usefulness of your investment. (See my PIP recipes and instructions) Buy a tall pressure cooker rather than a shorter model. If you ever decide you want to can a half dozen pints of jam or a couple of jars of pickles, the taller, deeper cookers are better suited than shallow pans.
Any pressure cooker less than 5 quarts will not be big enough to cook a meal for you family, soups, dry beans, or large foods. The small size limits the use of accessories too. Small, or specialty pressure cookers are useful as a second pressure cooker. The pressure frypan, which is designed for braising, not pressure frying, is also handy to prepare a sidedish.”
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Old 07-12-2007, 03:57   #3
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cooking dried beans.
Don't live off dried beans!!!!!!! You'll die! Your girly will leave!!!!! But you'll have wind in your sails
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Old 07-12-2007, 09:14   #4
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5 quarts is the minimum? Hogwash! I could use a pressure cooker to boil water or make soup if I want to, and 2/3 of 3.2 quarts is still plenty for many dishes that I would want to create.

Those 5 quart (what I have) models are just rediculously large for use in my galley. Everytime I see it in action I shudder about the pain-in-the-ass factor that's going to materialize when it's time to clean it.
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Old 07-12-2007, 11:14   #5
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Buy a bigger sink and a pot.

Pressure cookers that can can fish.......lots of fish, are invaluable on long ocean passages. Believe it or not, not many people (that I know) catch a lot of fish on long passages. I have caught 2 or 3 a day sometimes but there have been weeks with nothing.
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Old 07-12-2007, 11:46   #6
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Rebel,

We have one of the larger Kuhn Rikon pressure cookers and love it. Very high quality. They also make some smaller models. I think this is about what you are looking for:

Kuhn Rikon Switzerland Products: 2.5 Liter Pressure Frypan/Braiser

They are not cheap. We found ours at about half the MSRP after looking around a bit.

Charlie Phillips
Portland, OR
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Old 07-12-2007, 12:59   #7
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This is the one recommended on the microcruisers site. There is also one with a long handle that is not as wide that can be bought from REI.com as well as others that fits in the Force 10 seacock single burner stove.
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Old 07-12-2007, 16:18   #8
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I have a small pressure cooker (3 liter) and find it a perfect size when cooking for just myself. Looked all over but could not find anything smaller than 5qt - just too big for a small stove. Finally found one in Germany made by Tfal all stainless, but pricey at a little over 100 euro. I like the one you found online - no long handle to get in the way!
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Old 07-12-2007, 16:47   #9
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This one from CampMor works okay for me. It's aluminum so probably not as durable as stainless but I've no complaints after two years of light use.
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Old 07-12-2007, 16:59   #10
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It's interesting that on board my 23-ft English Westerly I had easy galley room for an aluminum and stainles Presto psr cookers - sst for psr cooking, the alum for baking. Aboard my 30-ft Golden Gate I have to nest all pots and fry pans into the oven. But managed to add the Kuhn Ricon 2.2Liter Braiser. It is shorter than the norm but has two short handles at each end instead of the single long handle - seems easier to handle and stow. (Kuhn Rikon Switzerland Products: 2.5 Liter Braiser)
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Old 07-12-2007, 17:08   #11
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Mirro 4 quart aluminum pressure cooker. by Mirro, Pressure Cookers/Canners at Goodman's Small Appliance & Housewares

This is what I use. It barely fits the sink on my 27.
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Old 07-12-2007, 18:24   #12
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The problem is it's too big for normal use, because it doesn't fit in a boat sink.
I think this is the perfect opportunity to start looking for a bigger boat
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Old 09-12-2007, 15:43   #13
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It is, in my opinion, important to have a pot that is big enough to cook a reasobnably large lobster.
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Old 24-07-2008, 12:44   #14
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Ahoy, Rebel Heart!

The criteria for selecting the right size of a pressure cooker has nothing to do with whether it fits in a galley sink! The old method of quick releasing pressure by placing the cooker under running cold water in a sink is as out of date as....well whatever.

Pressure cookers were re-engineered between 1985 and 1987. The new ones have a manual pressure release that frees you from the task of juggling your hot cooker over to a sink. The new ones also have a manual locking feature, and a rising (red) rod that gives a visual when the cooker is under pressure. There is also a special teflon-style washer inside the lid that will melt and release pressure safely if the cooker has been left unattended over high heat.

For maximun value for your dollar, get an 8-quart one. Anything smaller and you will miss out on one of the most valuable things a pressure cooker can do for you: preserve meats and vegetables. With an 8 quarter, you can process 7 pint jars at once. That's important when you consider the processing time is 65 minutes for meats (pints). Think about all that propane you're using!

Wishing you some fine (pressured) eating.

Regards,

Robbie
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Old 25-07-2008, 02:21   #15
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... The old method of quick releasing pressure by placing the cooker under running cold water in a sink is as out of date as....well whatever...
Don't we still want to (sometimes) rapidly cool the pot, to keep the contents from continuing to cook, even when the pressure has been relieved?
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