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Old 12-10-2012, 14:43   #16
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Originally Posted by rebel heart
My honest advice, take it for what it's worth. This is about cruising, not about living aboard in a marina or a mooring, which is much less complicated.

- Dump the dog. My wife and I both had dogs, I love dogs, she loves dogs.
- Get a boat that fits what you want to do with it. Don't buy a coastal cruiser in crap shape to go offshore, and don't buy an offshore boat do sit in a marina.
- Find someone who WORKS AND SAILS ON BOATS. Not just a mechanic, not just a sailor, but someone who is competent in both areas to help you find something. Just text them before you go to visit a boat and buy them lunch afterwards. Unless you guys feel comfortable inspecting standing rigging and head plumbing yourselves, bring someone else.

Is that an offer? : p

Like I said...there is a huge learning curve and we are probably going to do a thousand things wrong an if any of you are ever near us, you will know it because you will hear me cuss. Lol but, it's an experience. "The longest day is only 24 hours long." Unfortunately, we will be tied pretty close to land because of the job and we are trying to figure out the kids school situation. But, we want something that will allow us to learn and take short trips not too far out. I have no desire to spend the rest of my life being tied to a dock.
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Old 12-10-2012, 14:46   #17
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Re: Kids, pets, 2,300 miles, no boat and little money.

Maybe you could try renting a small travel trailer, say around 26', and try having everyone live in it for a month or so, just to see how it may feel.

Even then, you will have more living, and head room, than in a 35' sailboat.

Have a few days where you tell everyone that no one can go out to simulate stormy days where the family will be somewhat trapped below.

Also, limit all electrical use to 12v with limited recharging of the batteries. Limit all TV, video games, etc. Also, limit water use and have quick showers.

If you can all stand that experiment, then you should be able to put up with living on a similar sized boat. If not, then you will have saved the cost of a bigger boat, and you can possibly get a smaller trailer-sailer for family weekend outings.

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Old 12-10-2012, 14:49   #18
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Re: Kids, pets, 2,300 miles, no boat and little money.

What square footage are you living in now?
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Old 12-10-2012, 14:53   #19
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Originally Posted by David_Old_Jersey
Given the mention of getting jobs and having little money my suspicion is that OP (and family - dog included!) ain't going anywhere in a hurry.

My advice is to accept the financial reality that you can't afford a boat that would allow 5 (and a half!) to live onboard in some comfort - and that was also capable of sailing over the horizon. And I sure as sh#t would not get a project boat!

My suggestion?......at the risk of committing heresy .........buy a liveaboard boat, likely a motorboat (with broken engines) that has not left the dock in many a year. and never will. The idea is that you get more living area for your buck. Then it's simply a question of numbers on whether you find somewhere to keep her that works for the life ashore. Won't be maintanence free - but when you know it don't need to last a lifetime then corners can be cut .

Not to say that you can't keep one eye on the horizon (with kids or without ) by buying a small sailing dinghy or even a small boat - as budget allows. Will learn a lot (all of you) which will benefit in future years for when you cast off lines (both in experiance and by saving cash when you buy "the boat").......whilst you put together the dollars to do so.

Other peoples lives are always easier to sort out than own .

Actually, we are loading the truck on December 29th, no matter if we have found the right one or not. I have already arranged for the early termination of our lease, hubby has spoken with his work and found out that he will not be able to transfer and I have spoken with mine, which will allow me to transfer. I put notice of intent to move in the mail today to go to the courthouse and my kids dad, (which he doesn't see them now anyways so I don't foresee issues). So, the wheels are in motion, my friend. There are a thousand reasons to not do this. But, I figure in a year or 5 or 10, I will still be able to find those same reasons, if not others to forgo the idea. So... ::holds nose and jumps in the water::
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Old 12-10-2012, 18:37   #20
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Re: Kids, pets, 2,300 miles, no boat and little money.

Gypsy living in a trailer might be a good transition-as long as everyone understands that it is temporary. Living onboard is much better IMHO.
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Old 13-10-2012, 08:44   #21
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Originally Posted by dsmastern
Maybe you could try renting a small travel trailer, say around 26', and try having everyone live in it for a month or so, just to see how it may feel.

Even then, you will have more living, and head room, than in a 35' sailboat.

Have a few days where you tell everyone that no one can go out to simulate stormy days where the family will be somewhat trapped below.

Also, limit all electrical use to 12v with limited recharging of the batteries. Limit all TV, video games, etc. Also, limit water use and have quick showers.

If you can all stand that experiment, then you should be able to put up with living on a similar sized boat. If not, then you will have saved the cost of a bigger boat, and you can possibly get a smaller trailer-sailer for family weekend outings.

Lol, well...life situations through the years have landed us in all kinds of tight spaces...including all of us in one hotel room for months. While its certainly not comparable to a boat, I can say that we faired pretty well through it. : )

There is a point that you touch on though...water usage. For the last year and a half we have been living in our present home and it is large and nice. It's the first big house we have ever lived in and we are spoiled in concern to water. The owners installed a tankless hot water heater. You would not believe how nice it is to never...ever run out of hot water. ::sigh:: The sacrifices we must make. : p
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Old 13-10-2012, 09:49   #22
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Re: Kids, pets, 2,300 miles, no boat and little money.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gypsy_Soul View Post
Lol, well...life situations through the years have landed us in all kinds of tight spaces...including all of us in one hotel room for months. While its certainly not comparable to a boat, I can say that we faired pretty well through it. : )

There is a point that you touch on though...water usage. For the last year and a half we have been living in our present home and it is large and nice. It's the first big house we have ever lived in and we are spoiled in concern to water. The owners installed a tankless hot water heater. You would not believe how nice it is to never...ever run out of hot water. ::sigh:: The sacrifices we must make. : p
Hey look, Gypsy Soul, you WILL be limited in so many ways if living onboard any small boat. Why not skip over this stage and try to get from times when life landed you in situations to the one where you elect the situations you are in. I know, it is an extra effort in seeing things as they are, and probably too it runs against a gypsy soul. But it is well worth a try, because you may actually like it.

Unless you are in a very liveboard-friendly, very lifestyles-open-minded neighbourhood, you are never going to give equal-chance environment to your kids living aboard a small boat. I would think about it. It is fine to make one's own decisions, but it is twice that fine to try and visualise how our decisions will affect others (and, if we are selfish at all, how we will affect those that we claim we love most, like e.g. our kids).

It sounds like I am preaching and that's probably that. But I am doing this in good faith, with an open heart and an open mind - guided by observing very many live aboard families. I have lived aboard our boat for ten years now, at least some of what I feel may be of potential use for others planning a similar 'adventure'.

Take care, step lightly, rush into nothing. Boats are good for ones who love boats. Boat-equivalent lifestyles can be had elsewhere, a trailer half immersed in stagnant waters may not at all be such a great idea!

;-)
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Old 13-10-2012, 13:24   #23
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Hey look, Gypsy Soul, you WILL be limited in so many ways if living onboard any small boat. Why not skip over this stage and try to get from times when life landed you in situations to the one where you elect the situations you are in. I know, it is an extra effort in seeing things as they are, and probably too it runs against a gypsy soul. But it is well worth a try, because you may actually like it.

Unless you are in a very liveboard-friendly, very lifestyles-open-minded neighbourhood, you are never going to give equal-chance environment to your kids living aboard a small boat. I would think about it. It is fine to make one's own decisions, but it is twice that fine to try and visualise how our decisions will affect others (and, if we are selfish at all, how we will affect those that we claim we love most, like e.g. our kids).

It sounds like I am preaching and that's probably that. But I am doing this in good faith, with an open heart and an open mind - guided by observing very many live aboard families. I have lived aboard our boat for ten years now, at least some of what I feel may be of potential use for others planning a similar 'adventure'.

Take care, step lightly, rush into nothing. Boats are good for ones who love boats. Boat-equivalent lifestyles can be had elsewhere, a trailer half immersed in stagnant waters may not at all be such a great idea!

;-)
Big hug,
barnie

Oh, I hope you don't misunderstand. We are actually at a good point in our lives and we have worked hard to get here. We have done a lot to clean up our credit, have progressed greatly in our jobs (and income). Honestly, there is the argument that we would be stupid to leave where we are because we have made a good life. When we moved to Ohio it was because I had just met my birth mother and we all wanted to get to know each other. Hubby's family is in California and he goes years in between seeing them. So, we agreed to about 2 years here and then we would move to be near his. This way the kids would get to know all of their extended family.

The kids are on board with the idea and are old enough to understand when we have discussions about the issues that can arise and comforts we would give up. As with any other new adventure or hair brained idea...one year at a time. We work through it and re-assess after a year. If it isn't working for the kids, believe me when I say that we will all be affected. ; )

Also, I want for us to be able to take small outings on the weekends while we learn to handle everything. We would eventually like to use my vacation time to take longer voyages and eventually when the kids are long gone and it is down to hubby, the aging dog and myself...become full on cruisers. ::smiles::

Thank you, all for your concerns. I welcome it because it helps me to think more deeply and tunes our family communications about the issues.
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Old 13-10-2012, 16:29   #24
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Re: Kids, pets, 2,300 miles, no boat and little money.

Are you looking for a sail or motor boat? Have you actually been on board any boats for several days at a time? Do you know that living on a boat will not necessarily be less expensive than a small apartment? Just wondering because I don't know what pre conceived notions or goals you have as far as a boat goes.

If you buy a boat and keep it at a marina....you will need cash for an older boat ( mortgages hard to get on those) and more cash or credit cards to make necessary upgrades plus you will pay monthly rent and probably electric for the slip. Slip fees often increase with the length of the boat.

With 5 people ( and if you are looking for a sail boat)you will probably want at least a forty foot boat with possibly two heads. Most of those only have a master cabin or v berth and an aft cabin. Sometimes you can get two aft cabins, but that still leaves one child basically sleeping on the couch....full time. If you have more money to spend maybe you can find a catamaran ....but they are much wider and marina slips can be more expensive and harder to find.

Five people using the heads will mean frequent pump outs or walks to the bathrooms at the marina. Most boats have fairly small water heaters....showers will probably need to be staggered.

Many cheap boats only have ice boxes...if the do have ref. and/ freezer they are fairly small for a big family. If you have not yet looked at boats you really need to find out what you are willing to put up with. It will not be easy but it can be done, but consider carefully before you buy.
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Old 13-10-2012, 19:30   #25
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Originally Posted by WebWench
Are you looking for a sail or motor boat? Have you actually been on board any boats for several days at a time? Do you know that living on a boat will not necessarily be less expensive than a small apartment? Just wondering because I don't know what pre conceived notions or goals you have as far as a boat goes.

If you buy a boat and keep it at a marina....you will need cash for an older boat ( mortgages hard to get on those) and more cash or credit cards to make necessary upgrades plus you will pay monthly rent and probably electric for the slip. Slip fees often increase with the length of the boat.

With 5 people ( and if you are looking for a sail boat)you will probably want at least a forty foot boat with possibly two heads. Most of those only have a master cabin or v berth and an aft cabin. Sometimes you can get two aft cabins, but that still leaves one child basically sleeping on the couch....full time. If you have more money to spend maybe you can find a catamaran ....but they are much wider and marina slips can be more expensive and harder to find.

Five people using the heads will mean frequent pump outs or walks to the bathrooms at the marina. Most boats have fairly small water heaters....showers will probably need to be staggered.

Many cheap boats only have ice boxes...if the do have ref. and/ freezer they are fairly small for a big family. If you have not yet looked at boats you really need to find out what you are willing to put up with. It will not be easy but it can be done, but consider carefully before you buy.

We are looking at a sail and would LOVE a cat but unfortunately...out of of price range. We are hoping within a few years to be able to move into one. As of right now, we are spending about 3,500/month for living expenses in the house and that includes food. Food and our rent payment take up the larger part of it. I am living off the assumption that we will spend about the same with a boat except we will have a prettier back yard. ; )

I am tempted to look at brokerage sites and eyeball the pretties that we would have to try to finance. But...the same reasons I refuse to finance a house are the same reasons I refuse to finance a boat. Paying way more than its worth due to the interest, payments, knowing that at any point it can be taken from me if we go through a rough patch and once we decide to cruise for a while, I don't want to take the bank with us.

The head is one of my concerns. Since at least during the week, we will be tied to a dock, I thought about taping the seat down with a note that says "use land facilities". Haha

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Old 13-10-2012, 19:37   #26
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Re: Kids, pets, 2,300 miles, no boat and little money.

Good luck ..I like DOJs idea of a big motoryacht...even if it has bad engines..you could get one for free if you look around...
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Old 13-10-2012, 20:12   #27
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Re: Kids, pets, 2,300 miles, no boat and little money.

Good luck on your plans. In my opinion you have a tough road ahead. There are many more people who want to try living aboard than there are spaces for them.

Here is a clip from the City of Morro Bay website -

"Liveaboards
Chapter 15.40 of the Morro Bay Municipal Code, Vessel Habitation, regulates liveaboards within the City limits. A maximum number of 50 liveaboard permits are allowed. The vessel must be currently registered or documented, the liveaboard must be the registered or documented owner of the vessel, and the vessel must have a permanent docking location in Morro Bay to apply for a permit."

Lots of other rules and info here - City of Morro Bay - Official Website - City Harbor / Boating Facilities
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Old 13-10-2012, 21:16   #28
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Re: Kids, pets, 2,300 miles, no boat and little money.

Well GS...Here it is in a nutshell. For 5 1/2 souls and to have an inkling of privacy, you are looking at least a 45 ft. vessel. Fixer-upper that is fiberglass and cruise capable would cost $65,000. Turnkey, $110,000 with the current down market. Slip rent with livaboard fee $750 to $1000 a month. If it's a fixer, count on a monthly expenditure of at least $600 a month.
Or...you could stay where you are and save until after the kids grow up and buy a 35 ft. boat in good condition for $65.000 and go.
I take it that the children’s Dad is different than your current husband? If so, consider the ramifications of splitting the children from their dad. Sorry to be brutally honest but I was on the receiving end of that one.
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Old 13-10-2012, 21:20   #29
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Good luck on your plans. In my opinion you have a tough road ahead. There are many more people who want to try living aboard than there are spaces for them.

Here is a clip from the City of Morro Bay website -

"Liveaboards
Chapter 15.40 of the Morro Bay Municipal Code, Vessel Habitation, regulates liveaboards within the City limits. A maximum number of 50 liveaboard permits are allowed. The vessel must be currently registered or documented, the liveaboard must be the registered or documented owner of the vessel, and the vessel must have a permanent docking location in Morro Bay to apply for a permit."

Lots of other rules and info here - City of Morro Bay - Official Website - City Harbor / Boating Facilities

Excellent resource! That is my wishful area but I am flexible to a few different spots all along the coast. I am waiting to do my final transfer until I get a better plan for where we want/able to be.

: )
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Old 13-10-2012, 21:21   #30
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Originally Posted by tropicalescape
Good luck ..I like DOJs idea of a big motoryacht...even if it has bad engines..you could get one for free if you look around...
It is definitely an idea. I am planning on repairs in whatever we end up in and to keep saving to eventually upgrade. Perhaps, I should open my options a little more.

: )
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