Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 19-01-2009, 15:47   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1
How Small Is Too Small?

Hello:

Im new, first post see <----. Ill cut right to the chase I have about .01% experience sailing, my friend took me out on a small 10 ft sail boat once. We managed to capsize the sailboat and were unable to right it. We then swam about 1/2 mile back to the beach towing this anchor with the sail still open shoreward.

I however have a passion to circumnavigate the globe and explore. Whilst being ignorant of sailing I am adept at learning.

As such here are my questions, and initial thoughts.

I have been looking into used vessels that I could bring home and fix up as a medium term project. Hands on experience doing maintenance on the vessel I feel is very important to understanding the fundamentals of sailing and an absolute requirement for solo sailing.

What size, style and composition sailing vessel will best accommodate a single passenger for circumnavigation and day to day living activities? I would prefer a wider hulled craft as the speedy arrival at the final destination is not my objective, rather Im in it for the journey.

What size and type of power plant (IE engine) is needed if any?

What are some things that I should absolutely look for or out for?

Is there an old sailboat "graveyard" that unwanted vessels goto that I may be able to find a bargin from?

Thank you for your time.
__________________

__________________
grovernors is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2009, 16:20   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
hpeer's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Philadelphia
Boat: Murray 33-Chouette & Pape Steelmaid-44-Safara-both steel cutters
Posts: 3,896
I too am new here but I have a couple of suggestions.

Read all about Lyn and Larry Pardy.

Visit this site
http://www.meder.hu/meder_en.htm

Last week he was in Thailand.

Nuts - link is temp down.

Google "carina and me" Keep the quotes.
__________________

__________________
hpeer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2009, 16:32   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 944
Well I'm new as well and I'm looking for my first boat to live on and circumnavigate as well. I've posted a while back that I saw a single man living on and sailing around New Zealand, TAS and nearby islands with a boat that was no more then 20 feet, if that. He had just enough room to lay down and cook. The boat was VERY old and falling apart, but he was doing it and had no problems cruising where ever he wanted.

So, his standards are nowhere near mine so you really have to work out what level of comfort and safety makes you happy. I guess it's all different for everyone.
__________________
shadow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2009, 16:50   #4
Registered User
 
sabray's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Wash DC
Boat: PETERSON 44
Posts: 3,169
I think hereshoff said He had never met a man who ate ot slept standing up.
For me anything les then 28 woulld be to small and even then Id be looking into the 30's.
__________________
sabray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2009, 16:52   #5
Registered User
 
Tempest245's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Piscataway, NJ
Boat: 34 Sabre Tempest
Posts: 937
Hi Grovernors,

I'm not one to discourage someone from dreaming. That said, I'm curious how you came to your dream. There are many ways to explore this world, without sailing your own boat ...singlehanded?? around it. I'm interested in mental the journey that you've taken from one...unsuccessful sail ..to sailing singlehanded around the world.

However, if that's your goal....I'd learn how to sail without having to swim back to shore. What does that mean? I might take lessons from a sailing school, rent a few of their practice boats and learn the " art and craft" of sailing.

Impatiient? buy a small sailboat..18-22 footer...read books, find other sailors, play with it....learn how to sail it....sell it...

Learning....you will need to know, Navigation, Weather, Communications, Storm Tactics, Engine Repair, Rigging Repair..First Aid..Regulations....etc. etc. You also, just can't show up in a foreign port without some knowledge of the regulations of that country.

Have people done it without years of experience and study? sure a few? are you one who will ? I can't say...

What size boat? a Dana 26 has done it....a Westsail 32...among others..

What will you do for money? Suppose you get to a foreign port and need repairs? do you have skills to trade? Income? Lots to think about.

But, I think the 1st place to start is to learn how to sail...however you can do that.

Best wishes
__________________
Tempest
Tempest245 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2009, 17:05   #6
Senior Cruiser
 
DeepFrz's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Winnipeg
Boat: None at this time
Posts: 7,930
Keep in mind that Lin and Larry Pardey are both "little" people. I happened to talk to a naval architect in Vancouver when they were in town. He had just visited with them on their boat. He suggested that he or I (at 6'1") would need at least a 32' to be equivalent to their 24' (I believe it was Serafyn(sp?)) boat. So a lot depends on your physical size. Bunk length and width, headroom, etc. I remember at one boat show being very impressed with one traditionally styled boat but found that I got a nasty bump on the head when I sat in the settee. I could not sit up straight on the settee.

IMHO, I would suggest you look at as many different boats as you can before getting serious about buying. Lie in the berth, sit in the seats, pretend you are washing your face in the basin with the door closed, sit on the head, etc. Now imagine trying to move around when you are standing on one ear. Better yet is to try to get invited out for sails on different boats or to join a cruising club that has different boats for charter.
__________________
The Blue Dot Campaign. This Changes Everything.
DeepFrz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2009, 17:18   #7
Senior Cruiser
 
DeepFrz's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Winnipeg
Boat: None at this time
Posts: 7,930
Many marinas and boat yards have derelect boats. There are web sites that advertise boats that have been storm damaged etc. Just haunt the waterfront and talk to people. But don't be in a rush. Choose wisely. A boat that will safely take you around the world will be built differently than one made for Sunday cruises. You will soon learn to spot well built boats with strong rigging and "may" actually find a good boat to restore. You may actually find one in better shape for not much more money, but it wont be advertised by a broker. For that you need to meet and talk with people who are active in sailing.
__________________
The Blue Dot Campaign. This Changes Everything.
DeepFrz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2009, 17:31   #8
Senior Cruiser
 
mikereed100's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Santa Barbara
Boat: 46' custom cat
Posts: 1,571
Images: 2
Hello Grovenors,

Boat size is very subjective, but for comfort on a circumnavigation with 2 people I would probably be looking in the 32' plus range. There are a plethora of older, production fiberglass boats that could be had for cheap that would fill the bill. Look in Yachtworld and your local sailing rag, walk the marinas etc. and you will see what I mean. Learn all you can as you look and you will find your search narrowing. Forums such as this are a great place to start and many books have been written on the subject. Best of luck, have fun and welcome to the forum!

Mike
__________________
mikereed100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2009, 17:36   #9
Senior Cruiser
 
mikereed100's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Santa Barbara
Boat: 46' custom cat
Posts: 1,571
Images: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by sabray View Post
I think hereshoff said He had never met a man who ate ot slept standing up.
I like it! When I first went looking for a liveaboard my criteria were 33' long, 6'2" headroom and a shower. I ended up with a 1938 Seabird yawl, 25' on deck with 4'6" headroom and a hand pump for fresh water, no sink. I lived on the boat for 10 years, during which time my motto was "there's nothing you can do on your feet that can't be done on your knees"

Mike
__________________
mikereed100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2009, 17:42   #10
Registered User
 
sabray's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Wash DC
Boat: PETERSON 44
Posts: 3,169
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikereed100 View Post
I like it! When I first went looking for a liveaboard my criteria were 33' long, 6'2" headroom and a shower. I ended up with a 1938 Seabird yawl, 25' on deck with 4'6" headroom and a hand pump for fresh water, no sink. I lived on the boat for 10 years, during which time my motto was "there's nothing you can do on your feet that can't be done on your knees"

Mike

Classic Neat design The sea bird certainly enabled people to face some challenges they would not have been a position otherwise achieve.
__________________
sabray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2009, 17:47   #11
Registered User
 
Squeaks's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Oxnard / Alameda, CA
Boat: Golden Gate 30, Westerly 23
Posts: 169
Images: 3
It's so easy to want lots but best to keep it small and simple until you know what you really need.
__________________
We can't change the wind - but we can adjust our sails.
Squeaks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2009, 17:57   #12
Registered User
 
pjbsailing's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Sodus Bay, NY
Boat: Morgan 44 - Alert
Posts: 62
Go BIG, or Go Home!

Kidding. You have to learn how to sail, then decide on a size that you're comfortable with. I went from 23, to 25, to 34, and now 44 feet. We've peaked at 44. I'm starting to shrink now, so the boat's getting larger.

I started day sailing, racing, weekend cruising, weekly cruising, now four yrs away from live aboard. You could just dive into a larger boat. I know people who have, and have gone cruising for years. If I had the opportunity to leave years ago, I'd probably be out there in the 34 footer, having an adventure. However, there are advantages to gaining some experience first. Either route will be fun, so enjoy, and best of luck.

PJ
__________________
PJBsailing

http://lat43north.blogspot.com
pjbsailing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2009, 18:05   #13
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,150
I used to know a guy who circumnavigated in a Folkboat. I think the question of whats large enough to do a circumnavigation needs to be asked differently. At least two questions need to be asked. Is the boat large enough for me to be acceptably comfortable? Is the boat seaworthy?
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-01-2009, 10:14   #14
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 769
Quote:
Originally Posted by grovernors View Post
Hello:

Im new, first post see <----. Ill cut right to the chase I have about .01% experience sailing, my friend took me out on a small 10 ft sail boat once. We managed to capsize the sailboat and were unable to right it. We then swam about 1/2 mile back to the beach towing this anchor with the sail still open shoreward.

I however have a passion to circumnavigate the globe and explore. Whilst being ignorant of sailing I am adept at learning.

As such here are my questions, and initial thoughts.

I have been looking into used vessels that I could bring home and fix up as a medium term project. Hands on experience doing maintenance on the vessel I feel is very important to understanding the fundamentals of sailing and an absolute requirement for solo sailing.

What size, style and composition sailing vessel will best accommodate a single passenger for circumnavigation and day to day living activities? I would prefer a wider hulled craft as the speedy arrival at the final destination is not my objective, rather Im in it for the journey.

What size and type of power plant (IE engine) is needed if any?

What are some things that I should absolutely look for or out for?

Is there an old sailboat "graveyard" that unwanted vessels goto that I may be able to find a bargin from?

Thank you for your time.
I don't know your budget, but assuming it's not extravagant, I'd suggest you look at older Westsail32's or the similar but better (and more expensive) Valiant32's. This size class is pretty comfortable for a single live-aboard with ample storage, while also being large enough for occaisional passengers. Just my own opinion.
__________________
anotherT34C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-01-2009, 11:13   #15
Senior Cruiser
 
sandy daugherty's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: near Annapolis
Boat: PDQ 36 & Atlantic 42
Posts: 1,178
Whoa there! Deciding to sail around the world is like deciding to drive around the world; there are a couple of catches. Like learning to drive before you go take a driving test before getting a license before buying a car before putting away a little gas money before starting out before heading north east, south or west before running out of road, etc. Its always the little details that get you.

There have always been people who lived on flag poles or tree houses or in buried caskets. Someone survived going over Niagra Falls, too. Is this what you had in mind?

Take the A. test first. Buy a minimalist camping trailer. Paint the windows light gray and blue gray. Buy groceries. Lock yourself in. Oh yeah, take a book along. You pass the solitary confinement test in 30 days. Buy more groceries, lock yourself back in, while someone else drives you around the General Motors Test Track. For a month. Every 15 minutes you have to stand up and look around. Every two hours you have to be dowsed with cold salt water. Every three days you have to dissasemble and rebuild a rusty old piece of mechanical something, with the wrong tools. Once a week the camper falls over in one direction of another, throwing all the contents into one soup of disorder. Oh yeah, sleep when you can. This is the B. Test. You have passed if you still want to pass.

Another thing; if you pass, you failed. You don't want to see the world, you want to escape from it, at almost any price.

If, on the other hand, you want to explore this idea of living on a sailboat and going places, Do this. Get a small boat. Learn to sail. Sail across the lake and spend the night. Put it on a trailer and drive to a bigger lake and spend a week. Buy a bigger boat, and go to bigger water. Take each step to learn, through personal experience, how to deal with everyday things before you have to deal with once in a lifetime things. And remember: NOBODY BUYS THEIR LAST BOAT FIRST.
__________________

__________________
sandy daugherty is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Go Small - Go Now GordMay Liveaboard's Forum 92 06-01-2010 10:02
Need: Small Toaster Dmarina Families, Kids and Pets Afloat 17 29-07-2009 13:26
Small tender Brandywine General Sailing Forum 11 08-05-2008 12:54
Small AC Sandero Plumbing Systems and Fixtures 46 09-08-2007 07:28
Small boats Tigerlily Monohull Sailboats 11 09-03-2007 19:56



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 20:17.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.