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Old 22-12-2008, 16:54   #316
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Looks like a decent 37' on the east coast. I always wanted to build a boat. I am on my second Searunner that I bought....:-)


1981 Searunner Trimaran Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
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Old 22-12-2008, 17:48   #317
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Realistically, I will buy instead of build. But the though of building calls to me (like I'm sure it does to everyone else). You mentioned taking apart, and then rebuilding a tri. One of the things that I've ran into is boats on the West Coast (when I'm on the Great Lakes) being dirt cheap. I've even tossed around the idea of trying to move one back east over the road myself. I found what appears to be a 34' Piver project in Cali for $1,000 floating on the water. How do you go about getting the amas off? If I could get the amas off, then I could pay a crane to set it on a cradle on a 36' gooseneck car hauler, stack the amas on top, strap it down, drive home, and reassemble.

I've got a metric boatload of vacation time banked up, so to burn a month isn't a big deal.

Oh well, I've got time, but it's nice to pipe dream
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Old 22-12-2008, 19:37   #318
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Couple shots to show what I have been up to. As I had to re-install every single deck fitting I decided to do it right. All holes were drilled over sized and the top of the hole chamfered and then filled with epoxy. This way you can protect the plywood from contact with water, and the angle at the top of the hole will allow a lot more sealer to come in contact with the screw or bottom of the fitting.
Also I was not looking fwd. to installing all the nasty piano hinges that came off the boat. Many of the numerous screw holes had left water damage behind, and I thought they were just plain ugly anyhow. A lot of the deck on this boat had been rolled with cheap thinned out paint with little regard for edges. Almost everything had paint on it as I do not think the previous owner new what masking tape was...:-)
So I found these SS hinges with SS pins at the local hardware store. Looking at Westmarine I see hinges this size run $15 to $20...I got 25 hinges for about $40. I took them and rounded the corners with a grinder and 80 grit. Hopefully they will help clean things up. Getting very close to launch day. Just a few more fittings and step the mast.......
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Old 23-12-2008, 09:24   #319
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Quote:
Originally Posted by projectfiji View Post
I found what appears to be a 34' Piver project in Cali for $1,000 floating on the water. How do you go about getting the amas off? If I could get the amas off, then I could pay a crane to set it on a cradle on a 36' gooseneck car hauler, stack the amas on top, strap it down, drive home, and reassemble.
Let me tell you how, gently shooting you down in the process

1. Inspect the boat yourself and then have it professionally done. That should convince you about the sensibility of it all. But if it doesn't and it surveys well enough ...

2. Drive to CA

3. Have crane or travelift pull the boat out at set it on ... something. Stands are the most likely if you are going to build a cradle, but some flatbeds will allow you to jury rig a decent enough support frame if it doesn't extend to where you will need to cut.

3a. Build cradle matching the shape of the hull. Lower the boat onto the cradle (obviously, building a cradle while the boat is in the sling would save a second lift here, but usually isn't feasible for the marina ... at least, not without a cost to you.)

4. Remove mast. Brace out-hulls. Cut through hulls. lower hulls carefully. Place hulls on ... something. I think you will find that you can't place them on top of the boat or even the sides. Actually, I pretty much know this as I tried to do the same thing but bridges and federal regs tend to put a damper on that sort of thing. But, in the event you could ...

5. Drive home. Don't wreck. Oh, did I mention it's a wide load and you will need the permits, insurance and appropriate licenses? And if it's too wide you will need lead and trail cars

6. Have crane unload everything.

7. Build separate smaller end cradles for out hulls (that's four in total). Epoxy all the fresh wood surfaces to keep water out.

8. Get out hulls up in cradles and lined up with main hull. Ususally you need a few 55 gallon drums and some wood blocking. In your case, add dollies for each of barrels to move them more easily. Align in all three axis's, as well as for cant, camber and tow. In other words, fit everything back together exactly correctly.

9. While maintaining alignment, use butt blocks and bolts to ( ... no, seriously, they're really called butt blocks. Quit laughing) reinforce the cut on all structural elements. No, make that all elements. Epoxy everything in place -- all surfaces of the wood, the holes, the bolts, small animals nearby as a sacrifice to the Gougeon Bros.)

10. Admire your work. There you go, what could be easier? Now go do everything else.

Seriously, a head examination might be in order here.
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Old 23-12-2008, 09:36   #320
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Gently and most kindly, Maren presented the real options. The only thing remaining would be an audit of the costs involved to put the boat back in the water, exactly as it presented itself on the other coast. Then tally up the costs to get it ready for sea. One would still have an old Piver, only a more costly one. But then, we only go round once, so, you pay your money and take your chances. Enjoy the ride.
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Old 23-12-2008, 09:51   #321
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You know, I hate when I post two in a row, but that last one was so long I think I need to break things up a bit. One thing I didn't metion you asked. How to actually cut the boat. I used a chalk line, a small circular saw and a sawzall with the longest blade available.
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Old 23-12-2008, 13:41   #322
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OUCH!

Maren that is flat GNARLEY....yikes. What we won't do to get a good boat huh. Best thing you had going for you was you were attempting it with a modern design. I would not put so much atime and $ into an old Piver...no way.

There is a nice 40' for sale in Florida I think. The guy has a good website.

Moscan
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Old 23-12-2008, 14:18   #323
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Sorry to be a party pooper. Are we even speaking about moving a tri. across country?

Sounds like Folly to me.

There is a 40' glass Piver for sale in Fl. Also a Symons 33 in glass.

I'll give you the links if it more than Folly.
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Old 23-12-2008, 15:11   #324
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maren View Post
You know, I hate when I post two in a row, but that last one was so long I think I need to break things up a bit. One thing I didn't metion you asked. How to actually cut the boat. I used a chalk line, a small circular saw and a sawzall with the longest blade available.
Crazy stuff. I'm pretty sure you're insane my friend.

Cadence, shoot me the links on the FL boats if you don't mind. The problem with FL is that we either have to sail the back half of the great loop up the east coast and then in, or motor all the way up the TennTom, etc. At 7 knots (which I'm not sure a trimaran could achieve motoring up river) it would take about 180 hours (give or take). Or I could pay someone to charter it back north, but what fun is that?
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Old 23-12-2008, 15:38   #325
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Originally Posted by Jmolan View Post
Maren that is flat GNARLEY....yikes. What we won't do to get a good boat huh. Best thing you had going for you was you were attempting it with a modern design. I would not put so much atime and $ into an old Piver...no way.
Jack: Don't get me wrong, if one of the boat movers had not stolen the center section, I would happily be spending my vacation time putting her back to together. But I am probably not in the same situation as most other folks; I wanted to finish someone else's dream in addition to my own. Unfortunately we hired one boat mover who turned out to be a broker who then farmed the job out to two other firms. One was good, the other is criminal -- what can you say? Anyway, enough of that.

What I do want to say I really like the way the Cruzon is turning out and I've had couple of questions I've been waiting to ask which I hope you'll take a moment to answer.
  • What's the paint you used for the exterior and bottom? The results are beautiful. I suspect you already know that.
  • You also mentioned the interior paint of Roy's boat. Could you point me to the right thread. I caught the part in this thread with using high build primer, but I am looking for some sort of visual comparison.
  • Interiors - Basically I am hunting for ideas, so if you are willing to take any shots (the center board thruhulls come to mind ), I would be most appreciative.

Roy and Rann: Same. I certainly understand not wanting to photograph an ongoing project. But I specifically looking for ideas regarding the galley, nav station, cockpit, lighting schemes, battery set up and deck hardware placement. And, anything you might really like or dislike.

Cadence: Projectfiji implied, but did not state specifically state, where he was. I would hope he's on the East coast. He obviously is not on the West. I believe he is either on a large river or the great lakes. Either way, I think this is a bad idea for him, at least for now as he clearly cannot afford this project. Which reminds me....

Projectfiji: Do yourself a favor and wait. The will be tris for sale in the future. Unless I'm way off about your situation (and from your site, I don't think so) you would be best served to wait a bit. Actually, the very best situation is to have friend who has a boat. Sail and help.

Oh, happy holidays guys, I hope you are spending it with you families or friends.
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Old 23-12-2008, 17:30   #326
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Hi guys. I'm in the final stages of installing the aft-most fixed ports and opening "window" in the sterncastle. I got a good first coat of paint on the cabinsides, so I'll be sending some pics soon. Thanks for your patience. Happy Holidays.

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Old 23-12-2008, 17:41   #327
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What I do want to say I really like the way the Cruzon is turning out and I've had couple of questions I've been waiting to ask which I hope you'll take a moment to answer.
  • What's the paint you used for the exterior and bottom? The results are beautiful. I suspect you already know that.
  • You also mentioned the interior paint of Roy's boat. Could you point me to the right thread. I caught the part in this thread with using high build primer, but I am looking for some sort of visual comparison.
  • Interiors - Basically I am hunting for ideas, so if you are willing to take any shots (the center board thruhulls come to mind ), I would be most appreciative.
Exterior paint is Awl-Grip. We took a grinder and ground the edge of the deck all the way around, and stripped all the fiberglass off the deck cabinsides, cabin top and cockpit. This is after removing the mast and every single sticking screw and fitting on deck. From there it was 2-3 local Mexican guys about 3 months...maybe a little less, fiberglassing, filling, sanding, filling, sanding. I was in Alaska for 7 weeks during this time, and when I returned I Suez "heck we might as well do the hulls too". Fortunately the hulls were in good shape glass wise. But still more sanding, filling etc.
The actual spraying of primer and finish coats (2) took two days. The paint is real expensive and all the stuff that goes with it is very expensive. I hoped to it it well enough that it won't need doing again for at least ten years.
The bottom paint is another result of preparation I think. Turns out the boat had 7 coats of previous bottom coats. I took on the task of removing it all. After I got it all off (10 days with 36 grit disks) I went back and applied epoxy with fairing compound to fill all the scratches and swirlys. Back and re sanded with 80 grit on a palm sander.....whew! Every square inch done. So the paint went on real nice. Two coats on the bottom and 4 on the waterline and leading edges. I cannot recall the name of the product. But I believe the "look" is because of the preparation.
On Roy's boat, just click on his name and go to his images. The guy does nice work.
I am close to time to shoot the interior. It all takes so much time. I went to paint the inside of the windows and it took two weeks of sanding, filling, priming, filling....etc.
I believe intaking a few extra hours to get it right because I will hopefully be spending many years looking at it.
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Old 24-12-2008, 04:41   #328
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On Roy's boat, just click on his name and go to his images. The guy does nice work.
I had already seen them. In fact I've read through almost all of his posts and all of yours too. Stalker, no; research fanatic, yes.

Quote:
I believe intaking a few extra hours to get it right because I will hopefully be spending many years looking at it.
Just like Keats said: A thing of beauty is a joy forever.
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Old 24-12-2008, 08:19   #329
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Old 29-12-2008, 22:06   #330
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Close to launch

Been busy with Christmas and family, but am getting most things wrapped up before a soon to be launch.

First couple shots show the Skeg/Rudder/TrimTab in 3 different colors. It is standard Searunner stuff. Next shot is everything all painted up. The trim tab is new and I was real careful to get all of this balanced and it swings real easy. The trim tab is newly faired, and you can see I added zincs on both sides as well as the rudder hardware. I can swing the rudder with just a couple fingers pressure against the trailing edge.
The nest shots are of a dilemma I have been scratching my head about. How to mount the bow nets. I originally was going to drill out holes and run line through them, but I chickened out a bit and we'll see how it goes. One shot or two you can see the old wood rail that used to hold the lines. I plan to use these holes to anchor screws that are run through some Dynex. I may get it finished tomorrow and will have a shot of it then. The holes were drilled and chamfered and epoxied.
I got my visiting family to go out and set my Anchor/Mooring set up. It is the biggest Fortress anchor made. It is rated for like a 70 ft. boat in storm conditions. I run 120 ft. of chain with 50 ft. of Nylon line up to the buoy. I just grab the buoy and snap my bridal onto the thimble in the nylon. The bay is right in front of the house, and I can sail on and off. I rarely ever use the outboard unless we have to motor home (almost never)
Hopefully we step the mast in a day or so and launch this sucker.....:-)
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