Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 3 votes, 4.00 average. Display Modes
Old 23-12-2009, 11:38   #91
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Boston, MA
Boat: Bristol 38.8
Posts: 1,625
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam Wald View Post
Hey Curmudgeon,
I just looked at the picture of your boat on your profile. Nice lines. Very classic. Looks like a hard-chine wooden boat. Is it made of plywood? I have never heard of Sam Devlin. Is he a local guy in Boston? Did he build a lot of custom boats?
You're close. She's a stitch and glue boat (plywood and epoxy) built in the Pacific Northwest. She's a Lyle Hess knockoff, although she's a little lighter than his BCC and has those hard chines. Here are a couple of links:

Devlin Designing Boat Builders

Devlin Designing Boat Builders
__________________

__________________
Curmudgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-12-2009, 11:51   #92
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Harwich/Cape Cod, MA, USA
Boat: 1984 Aphrodite 101 Hull #264
Posts: 166
Send a message via Skype™ to NormanMartin
Don:
Agreed. After seeing what people arrive in and then cruise around the Caribbean in, pretty much any boat will do. Some look mighty "spartan."

I have seen your boat around the North East, I think. We aren't getting in much cruising these days, though.

Norman on Averisera in Boston
__________________

__________________
NormanMartin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-12-2009, 14:54   #93
Don't ask if you can't handle it
 
sailorboy1's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: On the boat somewhere
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 12,322
Quote:
Originally Posted by NormanMartin View Post
Don:
Agreed. After seeing what people arrive in and then cruise around the Caribbean in, pretty much any boat will do. Some look mighty "spartan."

I have seen your boat around the North East, I think. We aren't getting in much cruising these days, though.

Norman on Averisera in Boston

I haven't gone to visit D & D in a month. Instead I've been sitting around reading werid threads and causing trouble. And of course ...... lusting at boats on Yatchworld (none that are on this topic just to be on the topic thread).
__________________
sailorboy1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 23-12-2009, 16:10   #94
Registered User
 
Reality Check's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: West Indies, Now live aboard as cruiser/ voyager often with guest/ friends
Boat: 36' Bene
Posts: 585
Send a message via ICQ to Reality Check
Problem with threads like this is the truth get all tangled up with the prejudices of the detractors who know they have unfounded prejudices but just for the heck of it continue to profess to those who already know better. Probable waste of bandwidth.
__________________
I prefer a sailboat to a motorboat, and it is my belief that boat sailing is a finer, more difficult, and sturdier art than running a motor.
--- Jack London
Reality Check is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-12-2009, 16:59   #95
Registered User
 
Sailndive345's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St Augustine, FL
Boat: Beneteau Oceanis 461
Posts: 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by slap View Post
The bends in the toerail between the bolts went from the shrouds to the bow - not what you would get if you simply attached a block to the toerail and overloaded it.

Considering the level of effort that went into upgrading the hardware on that boat, I'd be a little surprised if they shackled any blocks to the toerail.
I normally stay away from this type of topic as I am extremely happy with my "Chevy" after five years of almost exclusive off shore mileage - just wanted to add to the Bene racing discussion -

I witnessed the described type of (forward) toerail bending on one of the boats I raced on when a mainsail preventer was rigged and attached to the toerail forward of the shrouds. On the earlier (mast) point, unless they replaced the furling mast with a std one, even if they somehow attached a full main to it, the weight (aloft) difference between a furling and non-furling mast is significant enough to create a big disadvantage when racing.

Happy holidays!

Sailndive
__________________
Sailndive345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-12-2009, 03:09   #96
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 15
Have to say that this looks to me a lot like mono vs. multi treds. You eider love it or hate it.

I understand both point of argument here, but interesting thing to me is that there is no one here that was disappointed by choosing production boats. Everyone that have it, love it and most others hate it.

Is there some jealousy going on there?
__________________
www.travellingtight.com
ibrgic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-12-2009, 03:29   #97
Registered User
 
Laidback's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 853
Question :- Can Jeanneau, Bavaria or Beneteau Be Good as Ocean-Crossing Boats?
Answer :- They must be good, they are already crossing oceans - in their thousands!


And I'm a fanatical multihuller
__________________
Laidback is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-12-2009, 05:10   #98
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality Check View Post
Problem with threads like this is the truth get all tangled up with the prejudices of the detractors who know they have unfounded prejudices but just for the heck of it continue to profess to those who already know better. Probable waste of bandwidth.
Of course that cuts both ways. Defenders also have unfounded prejudices.
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-12-2009, 06:19   #99
Registered User
 
Reality Check's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: West Indies, Now live aboard as cruiser/ voyager often with guest/ friends
Boat: 36' Bene
Posts: 585
Send a message via ICQ to Reality Check
Quote:
Originally Posted by sneuman View Post
Of course that cuts both ways. Defenders also have unfounded prejudices.
Actually most of the Defenders on this thread are those with real time long duration knowledge and use of the subjects, while many of the Detractors have limited or no actual knowledge or are basing their prejudices on hear say or or unfounded/ incorrect reports by 2nd/ 3rd/ 125th sources who overheard a conversation they think was about so and so.... in a bar by the river.... an inland river. Even though the detractors know they have no basis they will continue just as it was pointed out this is similar to the mono vs multi discussions..... such is often the case with sailors around a bar or on line computer chat forum.

You can never find the truth with such a post unless you personally can separate the wheat from the chaff.
__________________
I prefer a sailboat to a motorboat, and it is my belief that boat sailing is a finer, more difficult, and sturdier art than running a motor.
--- Jack London
Reality Check is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-12-2009, 06:30   #100
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality Check View Post
Actually most of the Defenders on this thread are those with real time long duration knowledge and use of the subjects, while many of the Detractors have limited or no actual knowledge or are basing their prejudices on hear say or or unfounded/ incorrect reports by 2nd/ 3rd/ 125th sources who overheard a conversation they think was about so and so.... in a bar by the river.... an inland river. Even though the detractors know they have no basis they will continue just as it was pointed out this is similar to the mono vs multi discussions..... such is often the case with sailors around a bar or on line computer chat forum.

You can never find the truth with such a post unless you personally can separate the wheat from the chaff.
My point is that owners often have the most difficulty separating the wheat from the chaff. Take a poll and most owners will have virtually nothing bad to say about the boats they own.

I personally take every opportunity to sail on every type/size/rig precisely so I have an understanding of what else is out there. Over the years, I have sailed on dozens of boats, monos and cats. Although I have no dog in this particular fight, I think you're assessment is a bit unfair.
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-12-2009, 13:17   #101
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Maryland
Posts: 4
What a read I must say.
__________________
burgos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-12-2009, 14:19   #102
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Somewhere in the South Pacific
Boat: 1984 CS 36
Posts: 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by ibrgic View Post
I understand both point of argument here, but interesting thing to me is that there is no one here that was disappointed by choosing production boats. Everyone that have it, love it and most others hate it.
good point.
__________________
kb79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-12-2009, 17:09   #103
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Brisbane
Boat: deboated
Posts: 672
I understand both point of argument here, but interesting thing to me is that there is no one here that was disappointed by choosing production boats. Everyone that have it, love it and most others hate it.
Yes very good point another is how many that have owned these boats get rid of them and go back to an older style, build?? The Peterson that I owned was a great boat and lived up to their reputation in every way but my next boat will be a Jeanneau, Bavaria or Beneteau or similar simply because modern material, design etc. I am in the automotive business and love the new design, technology etc and working with it can see the benefits while many yearn for the old heavy chrome laden vehicles of the past. Never mentioning the much higher maintenance requirements and unreliability that came with them, time does play tricks with the memory.
__________________
meyermm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-12-2009, 12:29   #104
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Boston, MA
Boat: Bristol 38.8
Posts: 1,625
So why are you buying a production boat to replace your Peterson instead of a Morris, Shannon, Wauquiez, Alubat or Hallberg Rassy? Or why not commission a custom design and have it built by a reputable yard?

The answer is, because you probably can't afford it. Please, don't make the argument that production boats exemplify the "new design, technology, etc." while the higher quality-- and higher cost-- alternatives are the "heavy and chrome laden" vestiges of the past.

There are lots of people cruising in production boats because there are alot of production boats. They're mass produced and mass marketed. They cost less when new, and they are relatively inexpensive when used, since they do not hold their value as well as a quality boat that is built to last.

So, to return to an automotive analogy, a Chevy is probably good enough for normal driving, but at 200 mph on the autobahn you'd really prefer a Mercedes, wouldn't you?
__________________
Curmudgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-12-2009, 13:37   #105
Registered User
 
Reality Check's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: West Indies, Now live aboard as cruiser/ voyager often with guest/ friends
Boat: 36' Bene
Posts: 585
Send a message via ICQ to Reality Check
Anyone with knowledge of Production/ Product and Quality Control knows that a production item that has been in production for some time will be of better quality and will meet design goals FAR better than any One Off/ Knock Off build even by "skilled" craftsmen.

Just look at the Military Aerospace activities, the first production models are test plate that are known to have a high probability of needing modifications after real life test. Same with any one off design. It is only through a reiterative process of close quality controls that the superior techniques and sequences are developed. While most are minor due to the accuracy of todays design techniques, some are more major. Another major benefit is parts replaceable. One offs are often so unique you can't locate a similar part when you leave the area the one of a kind boat was built.

But I know I'm wasting my typing to those who still think wood is superior to todays modern materials and techniques.... knowing they will continue to hang on to professed beliefs in all things Old when most know that are off target and lack the ability to see it and never will. Only time and progress will correct the problem as it almost always does.
__________________

__________________
I prefer a sailboat to a motorboat, and it is my belief that boat sailing is a finer, more difficult, and sturdier art than running a motor.
--- Jack London
Reality Check is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bavaria, beneteau, jeanneau, monohull, ocean crossing, offshore

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Beneteau, Bavaria and Jeanneau bg9208 Monohull Sailboats 36 17-05-2015 13:52
Bavaria 50 Cruiser vs Jeanneau 49 Leif Monohull Sailboats 3 01-03-2011 11:42



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 15:25.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.