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Old 10-02-2016, 10:54   #61
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

Slapping halyards is a sign of poor seamanship. Besides the noise factor, the halyards will wear against the spreaders or stays. If anyone complained, I would report their lack of consideration to the HM.

Once a Cheoy Lee was dragging its anchor in a gale and was swinging towards a beautiful Swedish wooden racing yacht. The HM and I watched as the Cheoy Lee came closer and closer to the docked Swede. Finally when the Cheoy Lee swung close enough to the Swede for me to jump aboard, I let out more anchor chain on the Cheoy and let the boat slip back into an empty berth.

When the owner of the Cheoy Lee finally arrived, I explained the situation and he invited me to dinner. The owner of the Swede didn't even say "thank you". I should have let the Cheoy Lee turn the Swede into matches, but the boat was too beautiful.
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Old 10-02-2016, 11:23   #62
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

I agree with those who feel obligated to help. I've saved several boats from sinking or dragging up on shore over the years and it's not like I'm particularly looking to do that. But sometimes you just have to. I've never worried about the legal aspects and have never contacted the owner of the boats I went aboard after the fact. One owner, whose boat I saved from sinking, found out it was me and went to great pains to graciously thank me. Another complained that I had used the "wrong" lines to tie up his boat and now his spare jib sheet was ruined, but the alternative was that his boat was about to chafe its one remaining dock line and come free from it's harbor float and play bowling ball with all the other boats in the harbor during a 45 knot blow at 2AM. I didn't offer to replace his spare (old and used) jib sheets but I did point out that he had no other lines available onboard his boat in any of the lockers and I wasn't about to risk my life going back to my boat to get mine. I once had someone "help" me by adjusting my docklines but luckily I returned in time to put it back the way it had been, which kept the boat clear of a piling, which his unhelpful adjustment would have allowed my boat to rub up against at low tide. If you're going to help, make sure it's really needed and try to stop and think so you don't end up making matters worst, or fix one problem at the expense of causing another. But if I see a need, I absolutely feel obligated to help out. Legalities will take care of themselves later. No, I'm not a lawyer like Dockhead is but my best friend is a lawyer and he won't charge me. I helped him out once a long time ago when he needed it and he's very honest and seems to have a very long memory. I know, not the stereotypical lawyer but very nice to have as a friend!
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Old 10-02-2016, 11:46   #63
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

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Originally Posted by Rick Williams View Post
What's the consensus on boarding a boat that needs to have its dock lines adjusted or repaired? If the wind comes up I always go down and check on my docklines but it seems there's lots of owners who don't do that and it's hard to watch someone wearing through their rubrails for lack of adjusting their spring line or similar.
I'm not sure if I was "caught" helping someone out by rummaging through their lockers for additional dock lines, whether that would be welcomed or not. I know I would welcome doing it for me but I believe a vessel is sovereign territory.
What say you all?
Stay away from it. If someone doesn't have brains enough to check their own dock lines. It could be considered a friendly gesture or not. If not I hope you have a load of personal liability insurance. I would probably do it but I'm old so today?
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Old 10-02-2016, 12:07   #64
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

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Originally Posted by Kita View Post
Danger fokes! If you save my boat,thank you!! BUT,let's say there is a storm,not a hurricane but just a small thunder storm & I come down to check my boat & I find you rummaging through my lockers,unlikely I will belive you are trying to help unless the boat is clearly in distress. I might think you are a thief taking advantage of the situation & that is a real problem! Board my rig & tie something because the noise is bothering you,if I caught you, well let's just say someone is gonna go swimming at the very least, YOU have the option to relocate. ...not board my boat! After reading how many people think nothing of getting on other people's boat I will always leave lines somewhere that can be had WITHOUT you getting in my lockers,that my friend is a step to far! I WILL take care of my lines to be a good neighbor. .but I catch you in my lockers,you may find yourself sleeping with the fish's
I would never touch anyone's lockers except in a really dire emergency where there is no other choice, but other sailors WILL go on your deck, if you're not on board and can't be contacted, and you've left your halyards in a mess. That is a generally accepted practice.

If you don't want that happening, then put up a sign expressing that wish, and with your contact numbers, and be sure to deal with your halyards yourself.

Slapping halyards IS poor seamanship, damages the halyards, and disturbs your neighbors. You have no right to impose them on your neighbors, and then expect them to "just relocate" if they don't like it. Bah.

If your boat broke a dockline in a storm and was about to break loose, and I was nearby, and saw it, I would board your boat with one of my own lines (I keep a supply of extra lines for this purpose) and secure it. I would not expect any thanks or anything in return, or to get my line back, but a common response of people who are helped in this way is to return the line, nicely coiled, with a bottle of some sort.

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Old 10-02-2016, 12:14   #65
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

I think that one of the most basic laws of humanity is to offer assistance to someone in danger, and for the most part that also applies to someones property. If it is within ones power to do so without putting oneself in danger, then I see it as an almost moral obligation. I doubt that there is a legal system anywhere that will hold someone, with good intent, liable for a good deed. Even here in the US...? If there is, we are done for as "civilized" people.

I cannot remember being in a marina that did not have slapping halyards as background music. When I lived in a marina, my rule was to make every effort to contact the owner [of any boat close enough to me to be a nuisance]; if that failed I would quickly tie the halyards to the shrouds. I boarded a boat one time when I simply could not take the noise anymore, and the owner, drunk, popped up in the companionway and began dressing me down for daring to board his boat. I tried to explain the problem, but he was not interested. He did leave his halyards tied off, but we never spoke again.

Re-tieing dock lines is, IMO, tricky business. Especially boats that are being blown onto the dock or float. Good judgement and good intent are the guide in that situation. If a boat is in imminent danger, something has to be done, but then follow-up would be necessary.

Much of the problem, at least here in the PNW is the sheer number of unattended boats anchored out or on moorings. Rarely attended to, sails hanging over the side, etc.. As we all know, the majority of boats rarely leave their slip, even in the marinas, let alone be tended to by the owners. I try not to anchor around any unattended boats, especially in the winter, as it would be a full time job "saving" them. The winter fronts come through this part of the world regularly, like freight trains, and every year many boats drag ashore and are damaged, lost, or even abandoned. In all honesty I find it difficult to justify tidying up those boats, short of being in danger of sinking.

Having said all that, if you ever find yourself in trouble and I am around, I will do my best to help...
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Old 10-02-2016, 12:41   #66
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

About ten days ago there were 5 boats in my marina that had their jibs unfurl in 50 knot gusts. I helped with three of them, others helped with the other two. The two things they all had in common; absent owners, and no wraps of the sheets around the sail. Two or three more pulls of the furling line would have saved the owners a lot of money. We only saved one sail, but left unattended, the masts of the unfurled boats were getting very close to smacking the boats beside them. Then I looted the boats for their booze.

I appreciate any help my boat requires when I'm not there.... um the varnish on my toe rails could use some attention. Just saying.

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Old 10-02-2016, 12:57   #67
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

One very early morning I was awaken by 2 people talking and drinking in the cockpit of my (then) 48' sportfisher. When I suddenly burst into the cockpit, naked, yelling "This is a good way to get yourself shot!", the man leaped off the boat in about 2 steps, leaving his female drinking companion to fend for herself. They had wandered down from the nearby bar/restaurant, having no clue about others' personal property. But I'll bet they never did that again.
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Old 10-02-2016, 13:02   #68
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cadence View Post
Stay away from it. If someone doesn't have brains enough to check their own dock lines. It could be considered a friendly gesture or not. If not I hope you have a load of personal liability insurance. I would probably do it but I'm old so today?
Yes, I agree -- in my opinion, if you do something on a stranger's boat just to make it tied up better, without any imminent danger of some kind of damage, then this starts to border on being meddlesome. Better to call the guy or leave a note or inform the harbormaster. A bit of chafing doesn't really qualify as "damage" in this case.

Obviously doesn't apply to people you know well and know would appreciate it. My mooring mate and I do things like that for each other all the time. But -- we know very well the tying-up practices and principles of the other.
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Old 10-02-2016, 13:08   #69
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

Better to beg forgiveness than permission.
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Old 10-02-2016, 13:15   #70
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

I think that it is great to help out you neighbors. I have adjusted dock lines a few times myself. I have also replaced dock lines but use lines that I own to do so. I have never boarded someones boat to do this but rather do it from the dock and would NEVER open a locker on someone else's boat and rummage through it even if it were to get dock lines to use on their boat.
If you are not willing to donate a dock line to help your neighbor you should call the harbor office and let them deal with it.
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Old 10-02-2016, 13:16   #71
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

I ALWAYS will help out a fellow sailor when in need; I wouldn't go into someone's locker, though. I've tied up many boats that needed an extra line, etc. Also, when I see someone coming into the dock, I will help out with the dock lines. I tried to do this with what I assume was a "nubie" on a nice 40' sailboat one time. He was coming in WAY too fast, and I kept waving to him to reverse it. He kept on coming, and then yelled at ME when I failed to stop this 40 footer, and he hit the dock mangling his bow lights and pulpit!
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Old 10-02-2016, 14:33   #72
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

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I don't think you're going to find a consensus here. On any subject.

I might board someone's boat, I might not. It depends on the situation.
Ron, years ago it would just be a friendly gesture and appreciated. Today the US needs torte reform. I could puke with the TV ads by ambulance chasers. I can't even blame the attorneys it is the laws that need to be changed. I can hear it now. He boarded my client's boat and caused physical and mental damage to my client. JMHO
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Old 10-02-2016, 15:21   #73
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

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................................
I can hear it now. He boarded my client's boat and caused physical and mental damage to my client. JMHO


Too true about the laws.

Physical damage? He wasn't there.

Mental - yup he sure was, 'cuz he was too stupid to tie his boat up so you had to help his boat to begin with!
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Old 10-02-2016, 16:09   #74
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

having been thru a few storms with my boat, and thru a bunch more on other boats since 1990, i have found that, in a storm, a true storm, one is way too busy taking care of own boat to mess with anyone else's. it is nasty and incompatible with survival in some cases to go onto someone else's boat--means you have to leave the safety of your own-- and do something to someone else's boat, when the person should be IN that boat anyway. when i am in a marina, i will go out, mebbe, to re set the lines, but i will not walk far in weather...there is no reason to .... the owner of boat knew weather was coming, and didnt do anything?? i will protect the other boats in marina.
if and when i see a boat dragging in a storm, i will call attention the fleet in wtf bay, we have a dragging boat yada yada yada... if conditions are not too bad, mebbe someone will help save the boat. i only have kayaks and rowboats htese days. sorry i cannot help you this time.
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Old 10-02-2016, 16:43   #75
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

In 1976 I had a boat in a marina in New Haven, Connecticut during a rare hurricane coming ashore very near there. Foolishly, I went to the marina to protect my baby (a 24 foot Seafarer).

I strung a spider web of lines using my anchor line from my boat to the dock and several light poles in the parking lot. Then I hunkered in the lee of a restaurant and watched the mayhem.

Numerous times I crawled out over the floating docks to check my lines for chafe. I checked other boats and added lines and chafing gear to neighbors boats. It got more difficult to get to my boat because the planks of the dock were being blown away like straws in the wind. This went on throughout the night. Toward morning I went home to get some sleep. When I returned to the marina later that day I found that the entire floating dock had broken away but was held in place solely by my spider web of lines to shore. However, someone else's boat on another dock broke free and smashed into mine doing much damage.

I wish someone had been checking his lines too. But I lived through it and have a tale to tell.


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