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Old 03-05-2024, 09:07   #16
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Re: What's a traveler actually doing?

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Originally Posted by trswem View Post
Help me I'm inexperienced and dumb. If I have a vang, what is the traveller doing and how much is my sailing experience going to change if I install one? My Macgregor 26D doesn't have one, and I'm wondering what I'm missing out on. My very naÔve understanding is that the mainsheet is controlling how far from amidships the boom travels, and also provides some downward force. My primary downward force is probably coming from the vang when I need it. So if the mainsheet has the horizontal covered, and the vang has the vertical, what's the traveler actually doing for me?
The traveler allows 'down force' when you have the boom out a bit on a reach etc. Otherwise, when the wind puffs your boom lifts and you lose that energy/speed from those puffs.
But for cruising, my traveler usually sat in the middle anyway. Allowing the boom to lift can be a good thing if the wind is gusting preventing heeling in gusts.
I would probably like one if it is already there, would I pay to add one...? maybe not.
If they could be much wider I would like one. But they are usually minimally effective with the narrow width.
I often used a Barber Hauler 4 part type thing to better effect, or simply a detachable Vang setup.. But it can be dicey in gusts....
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Old 03-05-2024, 09:20   #17
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Re: What's a traveler actually doing?

You are going up wind with the main pulled well in, you are hit by a gust and naturally ease the main. But initially the boom goes up not out as you hoped. That lift of the boom makes the mainsail more round and puts more power into it, the very thing you donít want. The vang also pushes the boom forward and this curves the mast taking some of the belly out of the mainsail and flattening it so depowering the sail. Tightening the down haul also flattens the sail as does hauling on the outhaul.
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Old 03-05-2024, 14:04   #18
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Re: What's a traveler actually doing?

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Originally Posted by singlespeed View Post
Everyone seems to miss the obvious one. In over 60 years of sailing, the only broken booms I have seen, excluding gooseneck failures, are breaks and cracks at the vang attachment (vang tang somehow sounds strange). The amount of force should not be underestimated, especially if using the vang to control the leach in higher winds.

Additionally, that traveller, when used properly, reduces the amount of mainsheet that has to be handled during jibes. Jibing from one downwind tack to another means hauling in a lot of mainsheet to both control the speed and force on the boom fittings. Failure to haul in the sheet when jibing means having a lot of line flung uncontrollably around the cockpit to potentially snag not only people, but winch handles and winches. Using the traveller eliminates a lot of unecessary effort and is much easier on the fittings.
Agree. I was cruising in our boat (no vang or traveler) for a decent number of years. When I decided to add one, it was the traveler. Between the traveler, mainsheet and preventer, I basically can do the same as a vang without all of the extra stress.

And, for jibes, the traveler makes it easier and safer. Head (as close as possible) to dead downwind, pull in the mainsheet, run the traveler over to the other side to fill the sail on the opposite side and steer up. Safe and easy.
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Old 03-05-2024, 14:35   #19
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Re: What's a traveler actually doing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by trswem View Post
Help me I'm inexperienced and dumb. If I have a vang, what is the traveller doing and how much is my sailing experience going to change if I install one? My Macgregor 26D doesn't have one, and I'm wondering what I'm missing out on. My very naÔve understanding is that the mainsheet is controlling how far from amidships the boom travels, and also provides some downward force. My primary downward force is probably coming from the vang when I need it. So if the mainsheet has the horizontal covered, and the vang has the vertical, what's the traveler actually doing for me?

Traveler and vang are two different sail controls.


The traveler varies the angle of attack. The vang adjusts the height of the boom.


Here's an excellent guide, the best I've ever read and I've read them all over the past 60 years:
https://shop.sailboatowners.com/sear...ail+trim+guide
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Old 03-05-2024, 15:12   #20
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Re: What's a traveler actually doing?

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Originally Posted by sailcub View Post
First off, why not read some sailing books and sailing tactics, then go on the boat and use the new knowledge....
Of course anyone can always do that but I think he was hoping to get some firsthand knowledge from folks who (may) know what they are talking about too.
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Old 03-05-2024, 15:17   #21
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Re: What's a traveler actually doing?

I personally donít find any advantage in having a traveler when jibing. I gotta pull the main sheet in all the way either way.
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Old 03-05-2024, 16:25   #22
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Re: What's a traveler actually doing?

My 36 footer had a traveler right at the companion way step, not the brightest idea. It was also complicating ingress and egress to the cabin during a sail. Not to mention splitting dodger/bimini set up into unworkable mess. As I decided to get a hardtop to replace that dodger/bimini combo the traveler had to go from the companionway step. Instead of finding a new place for it I went to a "German style" main sheet control putting the blocks just forward of the cabin hatch. What an improvement.
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