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Old 12-03-2017, 17:16   #46
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

Only one bottle? Lake of practice, not like most expats!
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Old 12-03-2017, 18:03   #47
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

Lots of good advice. I lean toward beach bum on Isla Mujeres myself....

From your wonderful first posts this probably doesn't need to be said but here goes anyway. When looking for crewing positions be up front with your medical issues. Not to make a big deal just just matter of fact so the captain can be aware of strengths and weaknesses of his crew.

Life rushes by quicker and quicker. Go small and go now.
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Old 12-03-2017, 18:17   #48
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

I agree with the people who say $80K isn't enough for a cat. I think if you budged $20K for a monohull and $10 for fixing things, you'd be more realistic. A good solid full keel boat can be single handed and lived on. You can learn to take care of a diesel engine and do basic electrical stuff. Of course, work on learning to sail a keelboat first; maybe it will turn out you really don't want to work that hard. But if you do, you could do it.

We (I'm 65/my wife is 57) bought a 1965 Alberg 35 three years ago. She was not a sailor; I'd never sailed or maintained something that big. The boat was in good shape but still needs maintenance and I had to learn to work on the diesel. She's learned to sail; this should be her first year really skippering at times.

So it can be done. Honestly? when we are on the boat one of the biggest issues is the simple effort of being on the boat: up and down three steps on the companionway, constantly keeping balance, moving things endlessly (whatever you want is always behind something else). We bought a slip at Anchorage Marina in Baltimore, so we have a home port. I don't think imagining you're going to always anchor out for free is realistic.

But it's all worth it to us. That's the question you have to answer: is it worth it to you?
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Old 12-03-2017, 18:42   #49
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

I suggest renting a boat (maybe via a house swap) for a few months in a practical yard. That will build your knowledge to ensure you buy the right boat for you, and you may find you can live on a much smaller/cheaper boat than you were expecting. The important thing is not to be discouraged by how many things that will go wrong in the first 12 months or so. But you'll soon get the hang of it. As for the Fibro, I have the same problem, but it disappeared completely once I moved back on board.
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Old 12-03-2017, 19:10   #50
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

Keri, I know you don't know me, but try and trust the people who have already been cruising for a time. Many of them will think you need more in the way of toys than you actually do. This is true of boat size, as well. Someone above attributed it to fashion, and that's about right.

What Boatman61 wrote about the Heavenly Twin, we happened to stay aboard on while Jim was doing hull repairs to our first Insatiable. Expect it to be cosy. The one we stayed on had been sailed from Great Britain to Queensland's sunny shores. Others have circumnavigated.

Think in terms of keeping things as simple as possible. KISS sailing has a lot to recommend to a woman of 62: less repairs if less toys. There are problems to solve, yes you need to work out reasonable drinking water. This may involve storage, rather than a watermaker. You need to work out charts and navigation, you do not necessarily need a chartplotter. If you have no radar, you sail more conservatively, you heave to well offshore to enter places in the daylight. It is sort of a game you can play to figure out how to live on a tiny boat, but it can be done. You may learn to deal with a porta-potty or a composting head in the US, but there are places where you can cruise where you do not need a holding tank--in spite of the horror this remark will engender, it is correct.

If you think about the conditions under which primitive humans lived, you will soon see that we need food and fluids, clothing, shelter, and something fulfilling to do. The rest is extra. How high on the hog you live is a function of both aspirations and available cash. CF's Mike O Reilly writes eloquently of minimalist living. SailorChic34 lives it, and zeehag, too. As Jim and I have grown older, we have started spending more, mostly for comfort; he is 79, and I am 77.



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Old 12-03-2017, 19:34   #51
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

Ann, the post above forces me to to wait no longer to say: I so very much value, and am very grateful for, all of the time, thought, and heartfelt feelings you (and Jim) put into the sharing of information on this forum. Your posts are cogent, on point, entertaining, and extremely helpful.

As my wife and I move into full time cruising in the next few months, I can honestly say that although you are half a planet away, I hope to share an anchorage with you two one day so that we meet. In the meantime, I will continue to smile every time I see your name on the left hand side of my screen, and soak up whatever hard-earned knowledge you choose to share.

To the OP: As you spend more time on this site, you will quickly learn who is writing from a place of "being out there and actually doing it". Ann and Jim are two of those folks, and they speak from vast amounts of experience. There are other contributors with experience that deep. Make good use of all that they share.
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Old 12-03-2017, 20:08   #52
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

Please take a look at your PM - there may be an alternative.
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Old 12-03-2017, 20:33   #53
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

SFS, those are kind words, indeed. Thank you so much. We'd be honored to share a cuppa or a glassa with you, any time. We learned a lot from those who went before us, too.

Kira, just keep on reading, you've been getting fantastic feedback here.

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Old 12-03-2017, 20:44   #54
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

Hi Keri,

I've been hesitant to post to your thread only because I think my experience is a bit different than yours, but I'll give you my story and you can see whether there might be something that's useful for you. I started 7 years ago knowing that I wanted to sell everything and live on a boat. I found that it takes a while to whittle down to practically nothing, though (ironically), I was someone who didn't care a lot for "stuff." At the same time, I started sailing with others and looking to buy a boat. Lots of work trying to figure this out. In fact, the very first boat I looked at was a cat, but after realizing their costs, difficult widths for marinas to accommodate, and different sailing capabilities, I focused instead on a monohull. I also considered very carefully what exactly I wanted to do with my boat (cruise, liveaboard, race singlehand, dive off it). This helped narrow the choices of which there are MANY. Once I bought my boat (at $52K) and even though it had great bones, it needed a lot of upgrades. I have my own environmental consulting business and no one else to depend on me, so I could spend my money freely, and I did. I have dumped a ton of money upgrading the boat based on the type of sailing I want to do (big ocean racing/passages and San Francisco Bay racing/sailing). This has been hugely more expensive than I ever imagined, but hey, I buy my clothes at Goodwill, never wear jewelry and rarely go out on the town so what else was I going to do with the stuff? I tell you this as a way to say "define your goals." There's nothing I like better than ad hoc planning, but that's a little more difficult when funds are limited (ask me how I know this now, too).

If I can channel a little bit of what you're dealing with, this is what I'd do: sell everything, go live in a shared rental house while you search for a boat, read everything you can on the different models and their attributes/deficits, get rid of all debt, save everything you have, think about going into business for yourself based on the type of work you know (I paid 15 dollars for a notarized signature the other day....for example), find a town to live where the costs are less (i.e., NOT San Francisco or Washington, DC), and try to sail and/or exercise as much as possible. It sounds as if health issues are a pretty big hurdle for you right now, so you need to try to get these under control. The more you can work toward good health as you work toward living on a boat, the better you will be. Can you do it alone? I don't know how to answer that. I do it, but I am not like most women. As the child of a single mother, I was taught by necessity to be independent. It's also just how I am genetically wired. That said, I have many friends who would probably walk to the ends of the earth to help me, if I were to ask. You might be single, but it's very difficult to do everything solo. Know when to ask for help only when you absolutely need it; know how to give it back, and then some, when you don't. You can always find ways to provide support to another as much as they can to you and it doesn't involve anything icky or illegal...

Soooo, can you do it? Only you know this for sure, but all the elements of the answer seem to be contained in these great posts from those who have way more experience out there than I. Collectively, I feel as if they will light your way and you will find your answer. Please keep us posted and let us know what you decide. And of course, feel free to send me a PM with questions. I am always happy to help others on this journey.
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Old 12-03-2017, 21:46   #55
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

Quote:
Originally Posted by Diesel Bill View Post
Hi Keri, My heart goes out to you for your open honest post. I think all of us here understand your desire to come home to the sea. For many it's not running away but running to return to a home we have not found on the land. For me I have a need to be near the ocean if not on it. Please listen to all the other posters and not jump into a new life by spending all your resources on a boat and then finding out that it's to difficult for you.
Try to find people with a boat who are willing to share some time to teach you about the rigors of life aboard boats. If you post where you are located I think many on here would open there hearts and boats to you to teach you. this way you would know if it's really what you want for possibly the rest of your life or just a passing dream.
I hope the best for you as you make these decisions. Be sure to keep us posted on which ever way you choose to go.
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I agree with Bill, having a boat is great (except for constant maintenance and expenses) but having a friend with a boat is better. Spread your wings, start sailing locally and network within the community and you might find someone who has an extra berth for you in exchange for shift watches and sharing chores aboard. A lot of uncertainties but could certainly be the adventure you're seeking.

My 2-cents.
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Old 12-03-2017, 22:02   #56
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

If you have equity in your home you might consider renting it out and using the positive monthly cash-flow for living expenses.

Taking out a second mortgage while you're still gainfully employed could extract some cash for immediate needs while your renters pay the mortgage and you retain ownership and potential appreciation in the home.

You might find someone here looking for someone like you to share expenses and experiences in traveling. (Can you cook?)
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Old 13-03-2017, 05:57   #57
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

Keri,
You've received a lot of great advice. The sailing club ideas are PRIMO! I sailed a few times for free and mostly for the day rate of $20-25. Invaluable experiences.
Buying the first round or a shared appetizer after the sail garners a lot of good will and many tips and ideas. Some good, some silly; but you'll get opportunities to sail again and again on private boats.

I, too, am looking for a reasonably priced boat (mono) trailer sailer; I've been checking here:
Champagne Boating on a Beer Budget! – Find & Buy, Boats & Gear, for Pennies on the Dollar! and on Jim's FB page.

There are MANY boats, you need to see them in person, and budget for a survey on anything you seriously consider. Talk to the other owners in the marina...you'll find out quickly if the boat you are looking at is a dog or pretty solid...
Don't rush, but plan to achieve your dream.
All best wishes
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Old 13-03-2017, 07:20   #58
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

Thumbs up to the 2 posts on cruising the canals in the UK and France. They are good alternatives.

Older Canal boats, GPR cruisers and dutch barge steel cruisers don't really depreciate in the UK/Ireland (obviously excluding the £300,000 luxury new build barges). They need basic maintenace but nothing too expensive because they have a gentle life on the canals so buying a boat in the UK or France could be a low risk option. You could spend years exploring the UK and still not see everything. The weather in the south is great in the summer but winters can be terrible. From what I've heard most livaboards are toasty with wood burning stoves.

I don't know anything about the canals in France but the country is fantastic so I assume the canals are great to explore too.

I'm 29 and fit so can't comment on medical conditions or imparments but I know of one boat owner near me that uses a zimmer frame to walk. She doesn't live aboard but seems to have no problem coming or going from the boat.


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Old 13-03-2017, 08:41   #59
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

It seems to me that you are headed to a situation that many fall into - living in a dock condo. That life is actually very nice with lots of friends. If you really want to be out on the water, consider keeping your home and getting an outboard. Going faster means exploring more local areas. If you get a livable boat - power or sail, unless you are very talented at repairs, you will be using expensive boat maintenance persons and may run out of money before you can safely get out on the water.

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Old 13-03-2017, 09:18   #60
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Re: Aging Newbie Needs Reality Check from Experienced Sailors

Catalac 9M or 900. Keep initial purchase price below $45k.

Older boats are not a depreciating asset, but neither are they an appreciating asset.
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