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Old 05-09-2017, 19:30   #3931
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

rossad, I hope to do so soon. Mark, look carefully at the cockpit, particularly the aft portside. There is a rectangular box, the cover for the outboard well, into which the motor can be sheltered when raised. Very clever. I'll provide detailed pics ASAP. Tom just launched the boat and I didn't want to press him. He will be tied alongside me for a couple months until he leaves for Mexico. I am as eager as anyone to experience this craft.
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Old 05-09-2017, 20:02   #3932
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

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rossad, I hope to do so soon. Mark, look carefully at the cockpit, particularly the aft portside. There is a rectangular box, the cover for the outboard well, into which the motor can be sheltered when raised. Very clever. I'll provide detailed pics ASAP. Tom just launched the boat and I didn't want to press him. He will be tied alongside me for a couple months until he leaves for Mexico. I am as eager as anyone to experience this craft.


I saw the box, and suspected that was it's purpose. Very clever!!! Some monos have done this, with the caveat being, that the foot can not be raised when not under way. This creates maintenance hassles.

I really like this boat, and for short range cruising folks or for weekending, this looks great! For a young couple, the Bahamas would not be out of the question.

As for seaworthiness, having sailed and lived aboard my SC 28, the issue is how much motion can the crew stand. Sailed with reserve, it would be up to some really nasty weather. While daysailing, close to home, I got mine up to 19 knots a couple of times!Click image for larger version

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With small tris, the motion can become a deal breaker for some folks, but with others, it is just a matter of getting used to it.

The folding feature means that you can save a bundle by keeping it in your driveway off season, OR do a bottom job in your driveway!

For people of more modest means or aspirations, and for us ol timers who eventually grow weary of the unbelievable commitment of owning a true blue water/liveaboard trimaran, this boat fills the bill nicely...

Good work John, indeed!

(28 years back...)
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Old 06-09-2017, 08:22   #3933
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

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The amas aren't really short - just not as long as racing tri amas, but there is a good reason for that.

When pushing a tri hard it is better for the amas to keep their bows up. This is when the design gets tricky. If you just increase volume up front you may actually increase pitchpoling moment. If the bow goes under then the deck area will act as a fulcrum for the rig and help pitchpole the boat over the leeward bow. So designers like to add volume only if it can be done cleverly, without adding so much that the ama becomes distorted or that the immersed drag increases hugely.

One nice way of helping the bows to stay high is to reduce the volume aft. This allows the rudder to stay in the water, which is always nice, and means the tendency for the boat to go bow down is countered by the rotation about the further forward ama volume. It is relatively old school thinking but it works.


cheers

Phil
I think there may be another element at work here too, it is hard to get the exact ama length from the pictures but it looks like they may be sized to not extend the length of the boat overall when folded. I'm thinking the ama sterns will line up with the main transom. The amas carry a pretty full section aft for buoyancy. The practical advantage of this is really for the wallet as you wouldn't need to pay for a 32' slip for a 30' boat.
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Old 06-09-2017, 14:50   #3934
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

It would be nice if the owner came on this thread and explained a few things from the horses mouth John Marples.
Or maybe he needs more time on the boat to see just how it performs.
Trailerable good
Inside a 10m 32 foot berth makes sense
The outboard well is nice to look and would function well if the hole is flush while sailing.
I think the inside is the key to this boat.
Is there enough height in the bow forward of the cabin to allow for good head room?
Lastly how easy would this tri flip?
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Old 06-09-2017, 18:50   #3935
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

The owner, Tom, has just learned about CF from me and will, likely, be weighing in soon. He's a very nice guy, I've known him for years, he has built several boats, all equally beautiful and strong.
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Old 11-09-2017, 11:53   #3936
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

I'm wondering about the possibility of locating a Honda vertical shaft engine in the space beneath the cockpit grate of an SR31, driving the lower end of an outboard, which would drive a shaft for an inboard. The lower unit has the right angle drive and the shift. An inboard with (or without) a folding prop is an attractive option in many ways...... steering NOT being one of them. Jim as I recall offered the Atomic twin as an option for the SR31. The 10.2 HP Honda is only 90 lbs shipping weight, and it's a modern engine. It would involve significant "creative fabrication", but it would solve some issues, such as accessibility and ready availability of parts, the prop coming out of the water in rough conditions, and most of all it is an air cooled engine, so it entirely eliminates the issue of pumping salt water through an engine's cooling system, something that offends every bone in my body...... It just literally hurts to think about pumping something so corrosive and destructive through a metal engine!!! It's an accepted "standard" in marine engines, but having worked with engines all my life, it's NOT a standard I can accept. H.W.
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Old 11-09-2017, 12:08   #3937
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

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the space beneath the cockpit grate of an SR31
Isn't the centerboard trunk there? Or are you talking aft of the centerboard trunk?
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Old 11-09-2017, 17:11   #3938
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

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Isn't the centerboard trunk there? Or are you talking aft of the centerboard trunk?
I'm talking about beside the centerboard trunk. This is the lateral location of the inboard engine on the SR31 (if used). The offset to one side is an advantage in reducing the tendency of the boat to yaw under power. Offset engines do not seem to be all that common, but they do exist. The example that comes to mind is the Tartan series of boats. The original 34 footer and I believe at least some of the 37's had the engine well forward in the main cabin, covered with a box and upholstered...... Probably because of the centerboard trunk, but with the added benefit of better weight distribution, easier access, and the angled prop. I thought long and hard about the 34C before concluding that a multihull was for me. H.W.
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Old 11-09-2017, 17:23   #3939
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

owly if you can get yourself a 34SR. They are brilliant in every which way.
I own a 37SR. It is such a good boat in every way. These Searunners or hard to beat. Even today with modern technology. The glass over play Searunner still has merits.
The 31SR is not in the same class, because its about being comfortable.
Thats my thoughts. good luck.
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Old 11-09-2017, 17:24   #3940
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

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I'm talking about beside the centerboard trunk. This is the lateral location of the inboard engine on the SR31 (if used). The offset to one side is an advantage in reducing the tendency of the boat to yaw under power. Offset engines do not seem to be all that common, but they do exist. The example that comes to mind is the Tartan series of boats. The original 34 footer and I believe at least some of the 37's had the engine well forward in the main cabin, covered with a box and upholstered...... Probably because of the centerboard trunk, but with the added benefit of better weight distribution, easier access, and the angled prop. I thought long and hard about the 34C before concluding that a multihull was for me. H.W.


IMO... this is a very bad idea!

The prop that far forward would be too close to the bottom in shallow water... also:

The prop in front of the rudder gives propwash past it, and a bit of steerage in tight quarters. Off to the side... "0"!

My ob motor on a sled beside the small aft cockpit, when I had a SC 28, worked GREAT, because I could turn the tiller and OB tiller together, for close in maneuverability.


If you do not like the weight and complication of an inboard, the best option is the Jim Brown ob motor sled with nacelle. It works great with a 9.9 hp sail drive ob motor, and John Marple's can send you the plans sheet.

The sled will not solve the maneuverability issue, and steering both tillers would be too problematic, being so far away, but otherwise, it allows the motor, prop and all, to be out of the water when sailing or not motoring, like at the dock.

Most barnacle growth is on underwater metal!!!

The nacelle minimizes pounding, and OB motors are not great in a really nasty chop, but for this boat, I think I would do this... [emoji1365]
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Old 11-09-2017, 17:43   #3941
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

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IMO... this is a very bad idea!

The prop that far forward would be too close to the bottom in shallow water... also:

The prop in front of the rudder gives propwash past it, and a bit of steerage in tight quarters. Off to the side... "0"!

My ob motor on a sled beside the small aft cockpit, when I had a SC 28, worked GREAT, because I could turn the tiller and OB tiller together, for close in maneuverability.


If you do not like the weight and complication of an inboard, the best option is the Jim Brown ob motor sled with nacelle. It works great with a 9.9 hp sail drive ob motor, and John Marple's can send you the plans sheet.

The sled will not solve the maneuverability issue, and steering both tillers would be too problematic, being so far away, but otherwise, it allows the motor, prop and all, to be out of the water when sailing or not motoring, like at the dock.

Most barnacle growth is on underwater metal!!!

The nacelle minimizes pounding, and OB motors are not great in a really nasty chop, but for this boat, I think I would do this... [emoji1365]
The prop would be exactly where it is designed to be, well aft, just forward of the skeg The outboard lower section is only to get the shaft down into the bilge, and provide a forward and reverse shift, where it can drive a shaft going through a stuffing box. The 90 pound engine would be up where it could easily be serviced from above, rather than stuffed into a hole aft of the galley where you have to work on your knees. It also uses an inexpensive $800 4 cycle Honda engine with overhead valves, full pressure oil system, spin on filter, low oil shut off, and electric start option, and best of all AIR COOLING, rather than sea water cooling. A folding prop would reduce drag of course....... and the turbulence you were speaking of. H.W.
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Old 11-09-2017, 17:49   #3942
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

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owly if you can get yourself a 34SR. They are brilliant in every which way.
I own a 37SR. It is such a good boat in every way. These Searunners or hard to beat. Even today with modern technology. The glass over play Searunner still has merits.
The 31SR is not in the same class, because its about being comfortable.
Thats my thoughts. good luck.
The SR34 is beyond my budget...... scarce as hen's teeth, and very expensive when you do find them. I would much prefer the 34 for a number of reasons, but I will NOT be sailing with a family, and likely be sailing single handed almost all the time. The comfort issues would pretty much be just about motion in my case, not space. The additional 500 pounds payload would be an asset, and that extra 3 feet would be nice, but the "premium" for that is pretty high. The 31's are inexpensive and relatively plentiful for exactly the reasons you mention......... I'm a realist. I'd rather spend my money on traveling than on a larger boat. It's been said by a wise man.......... and I don't know who to attribute this to...."buy the smallest boat that will do the job, not the largest you can afford". Or something to that effect. More and more, I see the wisdom of that. H.W. H.W.
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Old 11-09-2017, 21:42   #3943
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

There was a Searunner 37 yellow in colour for sale a year ago. it was slightly different with the design and was fairly new. It had an outboard well near the stern in front of the skeg. I think it looked OK.
I agree with you owly. Your right. Budget, time and at what stage of life you are at. It all comes down to getting what you want. Some of us never get there. We just dream about it. And find ourselves without meeting our dreams. That kinda happens to most people. Working away trying to get the vessel we want and never getting it.
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Old 12-09-2017, 06:58   #3944
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

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There was a Searunner 37 yellow in colour for sale a year ago. it was slightly different with the design and was fairly new. It had an outboard well near the stern in front of the skeg. I think it looked OK.
I agree with you owly. Your right. Budget, time and at what stage of life you are at. It all comes down to getting what you want. Some of us never get there. We just dream about it. And find ourselves without meeting our dreams. That kinda happens to most people. Working away trying to get the vessel we want and never getting it.
Does that put the outboard well behind the sterncastle, between the rear window and the transom? If so, that would make it a fairly decent location except that it would pretty much block the rear view when lifted. My proposal does a number of useful things. Foremost it uses a high quality, but inexpensive power head. The Honda engine is in a price class that makes it a "throw away, and replace" item. Second it places the engine is a fairly serviceable location. My idea was that a system of stainless steel wing nuts on studs would hold it in position with a drop in coupling. Third, it would use a stock set of gears and shift mechanism at the base, designed for an outboard, but serving as just a right angle reduction box and shift. Forth and important to me, it would entirely eliminate seawater going through the engine, by using air cooling, and the location beneath the grate in the cockpit would eliminate heat build up in the cabin from running the engine. The powerhead of course would not rotate like an outboard, it would just drive a shaft like an inboard, but be elevated, and at 90 pounds, that's not a big deal. The stowage compartment where the inboard should be, could then be used for fuel or water or batteries, etc. In the 31, the fuel for the inboard is carried under the cockpit grate. As for your question about "stage of life", I'll be eligible for early retirement in a couple of weeks........... I don't want to spend a lot of time messing about trying to find the perfect boat, and the best solutions for every issue. I plan to liquidate everything and live aboard / travel / voyage. There's a whole world out there I haven't seen, and I don't have enough "good" years left to see it all. I'm in excellent health, but that could change any time. Being active and at sea, exploring, interested in the world around me, meeting new people, going new places, etc, should make my last 20-30 years the best. If someday in the future someone sees an Searunner drifting with the tattered remains sails, and boards it to find some bleached bones as the only trace of the owner, then so be it...... I'd rather drift away to eternity than go "fighting fearful odds for the ashes of our fathers in the temples of the Gods". H.W.
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Old 12-09-2017, 13:14   #3945
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Re: Trimaran - Especially Searunner - Owners

Well spoken owly. Hope you reach your dream.
The outboard in the stern of a Searunner takes up valuable space.
Yes i believe it would work well. But it would change the concept of the stern castle.
I reckon the sled arrangement on the side is a better option.
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