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Old 15-07-2014, 09:48   #16
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

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Originally Posted by S/V Alchemy View Post

As for the tripline buoy itself, any old Clorox or antifreeze bottle with some sort of personal I.D mark on it should suffice
Just be careful you don't use a buoy that looks like rubbish.

Boats will sometimes motor directly over the top of floats like this as they move around the anchorage without realising the purpose and therefore the danger to their prop from the line underneath.
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Old 15-07-2014, 09:55   #17
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

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Originally Posted by noelex 77 View Post
Just be careful you don't use a buoy that looks like rubbish.

Boats will sometimes motor directly over the top of floats like this as they move around the anchorage without realising the purpose and therefore the danger to their prop from the line underneath.
Acknowledged, although I think a daub of vivid paint would lessen this risk.
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Old 15-07-2014, 10:02   #18
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

At fisherman supply houses, there are special ties available that release after a given number of hours. They are sold at various hour ratings. Their purpose is to stop theft from traps and loss from thoughtless boaters.

You coil your buoy line, tie it, and it goes down with the anchor. At the controlled time, the line is released, and the buoy pops up to the surface. This is good if you know when you are raising anchor, not so good in an emergency. But it can be used at times, to good effect.
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Old 15-07-2014, 10:44   #19
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

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Originally Posted by Cotemar View Post
The Harbor Master told me that he has a huge collection of anchors and line and not one cruiser has ever come back to ask him for their anchor back……
Which harbor? I could use a good used anchor.
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Old 15-07-2014, 11:13   #20
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by noelex 77 View Post
Just be careful you don't use a buoy that looks like rubbish.

Boats will sometimes motor directly over the top of floats like this as they move around the anchorage without realising the purpose and therefore the danger to their prop from the line underneath.
I know there are a lot of DS's out there but motoring over a buoy has got to be one of the dumbest thing a boat could do. What do they think the buoy is tied to and what if its gets into the prop or otherwise snags something on the boat??

A break away anchor buoy defeats the whole purpose of the buoy In the first place. The idea with the buoy is having a way to pull the anchor out backwards should it snag on an immovable object. The difference in cost between a 45# Manson Supreme and an anchor buoy is a lot of money. Of course, having a bunch of buoyed anchors in a close anchorage is a situation fraught with problems. The wandering idiots and swinging boats picking up the buoy would make life interesting.

The idea of zip tieing a line to the chain that can be used to pull the anchor out in an emergency sounds like a great idea. A length of 3/16" dyneema would be more than strong enough to do the job.
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Old 15-07-2014, 12:02   #21
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

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I know there are a lot of DS's out there but motoring over a buoy has got to be one of the dumbest thing a boat could do. What do they think the buoy is tied to and what if its gets into the prop or otherwise snags something on the boat??
People do some extraordinary things . However, I have seen anchor floats that can, and have been, mistaken for random bits of floating plastic rubbish. It is better to use something less ambiguous.

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A break away anchor buoy defeats the whole purpose of the buoy In the first place. The idea with the buoy is having a way to pull the anchor out backwards should it snag on an immovable object.
The weak link does not stop you pulling out the anchor backwards.

You usually need to attach a longer line to the trip line anyway so the only difference is that you attach this line below the weak link. It then works as normal.
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Old 15-07-2014, 12:03   #22
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

If you go to the Bahamas please do not buoy your anchor. Especially in busy anchorages. Very poor etiquette. You do not want a outboard getting tangled in it at night. In most anchorages you can see your anchor on the bottom with a lookey bucket, unless it's a Manson Supreme, then all you see is chain leading into sand.
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Old 15-07-2014, 12:23   #23
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

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If you use a normal surface anchor buoy there is a real danger of getting caught around the rudder/propshaft/stern gear/ladder of another boat at anchor, or your own when the wind changes. I have had this happen on several occasions (including one where the anchor dragged in very light wind because the trip line was a 1:1 scope attached to the crown of the anchor and my stern ladder). I don't use a surface anchor buoy often so it must be a significant risk.

The solution suggested is a good one, but it does not work if it is the chain that caught. This is a common problem in coral or rocky areas as opposed to the hazard of old mooring chains which usually just catch the anchor.

An alternative is to use a normal surface anchor buoy but put a weak link (I use a cable tie) a few meters below the surface. If the anchor gets caught you can reach down from the dingy and attach a line prior to the weak link. You then have a strong line back to the anchor crown. If the buoy does get caught the weak link will break the float will drift free leaving the anchor undisturbed. It does mean you lose the occasional anchor float, but they are only inexpensive. I usually just pick up old fisherman floats washed up on the beach. Recycling at its best.
I don't get it. If I can reach it from the dinghy, isn't it right at about propeller height, but without the surface warning to stay clear? How do you account for tide (I guess you have a lot less tide where you are than I do where I am). Even if it was 6' down, I would never find the damn thing again, I'm afraid. The water here is too murky.

I think that the anchorages here are also two crowded for surface level buoys. It is natural to sometimes swing over somebody else's anchor when you're tucked in tight, and you need room to get around between all the other boats as you come and go as well. I often enter at or after dusk, and buoys can be hard to spot.
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Old 15-07-2014, 12:30   #24
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

" Trip lines are also of little help when the chain has become entangled in underwater debris. I have cut away two anchors that were caught among debris in turbid water with strong currents where I was unwilling to dive.
Hudson Force


Anything that adds unnecessary complexity to anchoring is a liability. Err to the conservative . . . simple is better. Better to choose your anchorages carefully and stay away from the crowd. If it is necessary to anchor in close quarters, keep a secure but short scope and a watchful eye. And, there are those times, as described above, that are unavoidable and part of cruising. For me, no buoys, no trip lines, no drama. Good luck and good sailing.
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Old 15-07-2014, 12:51   #25
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

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Originally Posted by roverhi View Post
I know there are a lot of DS's out there but motoring over a buoy has got to be one of the dumbest thing a boat could do. What do they think the buoy is tied to and what if its gets into the prop or otherwise snags something on the boat??

.
Ever gone into an anchorage at night?
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Old 15-07-2014, 13:08   #26
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

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I don't get it. If I can reach it from the dinghy, isn't it right at about propeller height, but without the surface warning to stay clear?

The anchor float sits on the surface. Even assuming no tide the trip line is usually a few metres longer than the depth. If there is some tide there will be more slack. So you attach a strong sinking line to crown of the anchor but make this 2-3m shorter than you would normally. Attach a weak link and further 2-3m of line leading to the buoy.

The trip line is therefore the same length as you would normally use, but sitting 2-3m below the surface is the weak link. When you need to use the trip line to free the anchor, grab the anchor float (from the dingy) pull in the spare line and if you have calculated right the loop where the weak link is attached should come to the surface. Attach a line to the loop prior to the weak link. You can then winch this with the boats anchor winch to pull the anchor out by the crown.

I agree anchor floats should be used sparingly.
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Old 15-07-2014, 14:07   #27
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

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Originally Posted by noelex 77 View Post
The anchor float sits on the surface. Even assuming no tide the trip line is usually a few metres longer than the depth. If there is some tide there will be more slack. So you attach a strong sinking line to crown of the anchor but make this 2-3m shorter than you would normally. Attach a weak link and further 2-3m of line leading to the buoy.

The trip line is same length as you would normally use, but sitting 2-3m below the surface is the weak length. If you need to use the trip line to free the anchor, from the dingy, you grab the anchor float pull in the spare line and if you have calculated right the loop where the weak link is attached should come to the surface. Attach a line to the loop prior to the weak link. You can then winch this with the boats anchor winch to pull the anchor out by the crown.

I agree anchor floats should be used sparingly.
I get it! Sorry I was a bit slow. I read it that the float was a couple feet below the surface, not the link! thanks for clarifying
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Old 15-07-2014, 22:39   #28
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

A friend described what he said was called a "pucker":
Attach your main chain end to the trip hole.
Then, attach to the proper end
whatever link lines up with that hole.
Attach that link to the hole with stainless
wire with a couple or three or four loops (it's a guess).
So, part of the chain is running along the stock
and is attached to the anchor at two places.

The anchor will act normal unless there is
extraordinary resistance, such as when
fouled. Once over the anchor, the pull
up the chain will break the wire and the
anchor will be pulled by the trip line hole.

This was used only when fishing. Not for
anchoring overnight or when expecting a
blow.
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Old 17-07-2014, 21:11   #29
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Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

Tell me what is wrong with my idea.
Use an anchor buoy but set it up so that it floats 8' below the surface at low tide. This keeps it from fouling any props.
If for some reason the water is murky and its hard to find, well its better than nothing. Maybe you will find it. If your anchor is fouled, you are going to be hoisting it and be directly over it.
Or, use a small, expendable surface float with an easily breakable line and tie that to the bottom of your submerged float. I would use a duck decoy. You can find your submerged float easily then.

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Old 18-07-2014, 05:20   #30
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Re: Do not Attach a Floating Buoy to a Trip Line.

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Tell me what is wrong with my idea.
Use an anchor buoy but set it up so that it floats 8' below the surface at low tide. This keeps it from fouling any props.
Most of the places where I anchor are about 8 feet deep!
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