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Old 25-03-2020, 16:54   #16
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Re: how to rig an inner forestay which MUST be parallel to main forestay?

We sailed on a sloop that hoisted a solent jib on the regular forestay when the wind piped up (25kts). When the wind piped up some more (35kts), we reefed it by lowering it a notch and sheeting to a clew higher up - like slab reefing a mainsail. No fuss, no muss.
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Old 25-03-2020, 17:33   #17
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Re: how to rig an inner forestay which MUST be parallel to main forestay?

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Originally Posted by waterman46 View Post
Why a spacer inside the mast? I added a non-parallel inner stay about 2' below the mast top. Drilled a hole through both sides of mast and ran a bolt through. No spacer needed, just snug the nut on that bolt up against the mast but not real tight, and use either two nuts tightened together with a lockwasher or a nyloc nut. Bolt runs through ends of two SS straps that meet together in front of the mast to take the inner stay pin. I think I bought that SS mast tang part as an assembly somewhere.

Mast has a rather strong cross-section and with only 2' separation below the backstay I have not noticed any mast bend when closehauled with staysail in a stiff breeze.
Running backstays are a big expense and a pain to use.

We use a detachable inner forestay with lever tightener. Wonder if you want to leave that inner forestay in place permanently?
Running backstays is a pain in close quarters but for passages not a problem. I know, I sailed with them for many years. In tacking conditions I just did not bother with the staysail.

If you are carefull not to tighten the thru bolt more than needed, and making sure the nuts will not back out than it is okay as you've described.

My intention is to use the inner forestail for the storm jib, so if it is at the spreader or jts above it would be better to manage the wire (shorter) when not in use. Too far up may interfere with tacking if the staysail is used with the genoa.
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Old 25-03-2020, 20:57   #18
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Re: how to rig an inner forestay which MUST be parallel to main forestay?

Quote:
We sailed on a sloop that hoisted a solent jib on the regular forestay when the wind piped up (25kts).
A Solent jib is by definition NOT hoisted on the forestay, but on a separate stay whose head is near the forestay's and whose deck termination is somewhat aft of that of the forestay.

So, not sure what you are talking about.

In the distant past, long before furling sails, we tried out slab reefing jibs. Never found them satisfactory, for containing the bunt of the sail proved nigh impossible for more than very s hort intervals, and sail shape wasn't good either. Further, setting the reef on a pitching fordeck was damn hard and quite scary. In the long run, changing headsails was a better method of reducing sail area.

Jim
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Old 26-03-2020, 00:49   #19
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Re: how to rig an inner forestay which MUST be parallel to main forestay?

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Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
A Solent jib is by definition NOT hoisted on the forestay, but on a separate stay whose head is near the forestay's and whose deck termination is somewhat aft of that of the forestay.

So, not sure what you are talking about.

In the distant past, long before furling sails, we tried out slab reefing jibs. Never found them satisfactory, for containing the bunt of the sail proved nigh impossible for more than very s hort intervals, and sail shape wasn't good either. Further, setting the reef on a pitching fordeck was damn hard and quite scary. In the long run, changing headsails was a better method of reducing sail area.

Jim

Well, our French-origin cat with only one forestay calls its self-tacking jib a solent. So it’s likely that.

Also agree that reefing a headsail only the days of furling sails seems silly. Either have multiple stays and different sized sails on each of them, or stick with a single furling sail and is a temporary stay for a staysail and/or storm jib.
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