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Old 17-01-2013, 10:15   #1
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Boat Handling

Are there any programs for learning to handle a twin engine trawler? I have extensive single engine experience but just purchased a 36' twin screw trawler & would prefer to feel more confident prior to first trip from dock.
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Old 17-01-2013, 10:21   #2
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Re: Boat Handling

One of the local dealers here in SF Bay runs a trawler school. Tell us where you're located, and someone might be able to point you in the right direction.
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Old 17-01-2013, 10:36   #3
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Re: Boat Handling

Located in Marathon, Fl.
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Old 18-01-2013, 08:03   #4
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Re: Boat Handling

Quote:
Originally Posted by moonchaser View Post
Are there any programs for learning to handle a twin engine trawler? I have extensive single engine experience but just purchased a 36' twin screw trawler & would prefer to feel more confident prior to first trip from dock.

Don't know about programs in the application software sense, but there are boat handling schools scattered around the country. Or you could hire a captain to come aboard, give you some pointers.

FWIW, you already know how to do it. Everything you know about single-screw docking still works... but now you can use one engine to bump the stern one direction, the other to do the other.

For a stern-to docking situation, imagine two "parallel" arcs, or parentheses if you like: ( )

Port engine drives the port side arc, using forward or reverse. Starboard engine drive the starboard side arc, ditto. IOW, prop walk works as with a single, but now you have two directions of that to make use of.

In most cases, depending on tides/current and windage, you can set your wheel amidships and the throttles down at bone idle, use neutral a lot and use only the shifters to steer (and very slowly move) the boat. If the boat's going in the direction you want while you're in neutral... let it continue doing that. (I usually turn to face aft, the direction the boat will be moving, in this situation.)

If your first attempt is on a dead calm day... you'll make a pretty good landing with no further instruction. Once you can do it well once, you'll have the theory down.. and after that it's just a matter of practice to develop a feel for your particular boat.

-Chris
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Old 18-01-2013, 09:44   #5
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Thanks for taking the time to help out. I was hoping there might be some kind of simulated program as I really do not desire taking a class. I have operated track type excavation equipment so have a feel for the concept at least, & of course I have run a single screw for many years. I just need to pick a calm day, have some friends with boat hooks standing by, & gently spin around to exit the canal she is docked in. Once out in the open (Boot Key) I can practice till more confident. Jim
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Old 18-01-2013, 10:31   #6
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Re: Boat Handling

You'll find that driving a twin screw vessel is a piece of cake compared with handling a single screw. My advice would be to try and get hooked up with the skipper of a crew boat servicing offshore rigs and pay him/her for a couple of afternoons of his time. Invite his family or significant other along for the ride. He/she can show you some tricks of balancing in a cross sea and current, docking in cross winds and picking up moorings shorthanded. As Ranger42C suggested, steering and balancing in a seaway is a breeze. Like anything else, practice, practice, practice... good luck! Phil
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Old 18-01-2013, 10:36   #7
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Re: Boat Handling

Here you go.


Docking Game - Boat Florida, (Space Coast)
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