Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 05-10-2015, 18:51   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 7
Flybridge removal

We are shipping our 74 Hatteras 38DCMY, and need to remove the flybridge for shipping, and ALL the marinas that can do this are overwhelmed with pullouts, and so Im wondering; How hard can this be. Ive got basic carpentry skills, drills, sawzall, and a couple of buddies willing to give me a hand, so what am i getting into? Is there a step by step manual that covers these old hats? Seems like it cant be too complicating, and Im being told its just a bunch of screws, 1 has told me its bolted, where are they? Do I have to remove the finished ceiling in the salon to access them? Im not getting any response from hatteras about this, yet, and so I thought Id try here for any info, thnx, Rob
__________________

__________________
wildmountainman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2015, 12:21   #2
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Anacortes
Boat: previous - Whitby 42 new - Goldenwave 44
Posts: 1,735
Re: Flybridge removal

I have worked on a couple of boats going through this. I did the electrical and electronics part, and I got to watch the other stuff. The electronics can be a real bear as you can't cut the radar antenna cable, GPS cable, maybe some others. The real problem with it all is access and how much they secured the wires when they originally built the boat at the factory, or wherever the flybridge was put on. It is time consuming with much swearing involved. But you can do it eventually. But you have to either pull the electronic cables all the way up to the flybridge/arch or go the other way. Your call on what is the easiest. You have to disconnect whichever end you need to pull up and protect it well for pulling through holes just barely big enough. Sometimes you do not want to cut off the connectors.

The electrical is usually easier in that you can cut most of the wires. Labeling is critically important for when you want to put it all back together.

If you have a separate steering station up there and that needs to be removed, usually hydraulic although it could be electronic, that requires the ability to disconnect, seal, and protect the ends of the tubing. Wires are easier. Same for engine controls if you have them, e.g. a MicroCommander, which is easier as it is just wiring and connectors. But labeling is key here too as you want to put everything back together exactly the way it was.

The physical parts - access, dismemberment, etc. - depends on how it was put together. There will be caulking to remove on some of it, perhaps most all of it. This can be a terrible job and one where you can truly damage things you don't want to damage - gelcoat, fiberglass, metal trim, paint, woodwork, etc. You have to use great care and be patient, especially if you have never done it before. It is not a sawsall job unless you want to pay someone to do the repairs at the other end. Those will be dramatically expensive since colors have to be matched, damaged trim repaired/replaced, screws and bolts figured out, etc.

If you labeled everything then putting back the mechanical and electrical parts is pretty straightforward but time consuming. Use labels that will not be torn off during the removal, travel, and reinstallation. You will hate life if you don't do that.

Can you do it? Yep, but it will be a chore and very dependent on your particular flybridge and how it was originally built. I suspect you will have some damage to repair, but the pros doing it will probably have some to do as well, only less so. Unfortunately some parts may have to be destroyed, like plywood internal bracing/reinforcements, etc. But not guaranteed you'll have to face that. Someone who has done that particular model, year, etc. before will have a rough idea what that will be. You will be on a mission of discovery. But, given the wide different number of models, and changes to models over the years, and lack of experience by some pros, you will be doing the same as them, only slower.

You can do it all though but it isn't an easy job - usually. You may luck out. You might be able to hire someone to do a particularly hard part. Good luck.
__________________

__________________
exMaggieDrum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2015, 10:39   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 7
Re: Flybridge removal

Quote:
Originally Posted by exMaggieDrum View Post
I have worked on a couple of boats going through this. I did the electrical and electronics part, and I got to watch the other stuff. The electronics can be a real bear as you can't cut the radar antenna cable, GPS cable, maybe some others. The real problem with it all is access and how much they secured the wires when they originally built the boat at the factory, or wherever the flybridge was put on. It is time consuming with much swearing involved. But you can do it eventually. But you have to either pull the electronic cables all the way up to the flybridge/arch or go the other way. Your call on what is the easiest. You have to disconnect whichever end you need to pull up and protect it well for pulling through holes just barely big enough. Sometimes you do not want to cut off the connectors.

The electrical is usually easier in that you can cut most of the wires. Labeling is critically important for when you want to put it all back together.


If you have a separate steering station up there and that needs to be removed, usually hydraulic although it could be electronic, that requires the ability to disconnect, seal, and protect the ends of the tubing. Wires are easier. Same for engine controls if you have them, e.g. a MicroCommander, which is easier as it is just wiring and connectors. But labeling is key here too as you want to put everything back together exactly the way it was.

The physical parts - access, dismemberment, etc. - depends on how it was put together. There will be caulking to remove on some of it, perhaps most all of it. This can be a terrible job and one where you can truly damage things you don't want to damage - gelcoat, fiberglass, metal trim, paint, woodwork, etc. You have to use great care and be patient, especially if you have never done it before. It is not a sawsall job unless you want to pay someone to do the repairs at the other end. Those will be dramatically expensive since colors have to be matched, damaged trim repaired/replaced, screws and bolts figured out, etc.

If you labeled everything then putting back the mechanical and electrical parts is pretty straightforward but time consuming. Use labels that will not be torn off during the removal, travel, and reinstallation. You will hate life if you don't do that.

Can you do it? Yep, but it will be a chore and very dependent on your particular flybridge and how it was originally built. I suspect you will have some damage to repair, but the pros doing it will probably have some to do as well, only less so. Unfortunately some parts may have to be destroyed, like plywood internal bracing/reinforcements, etc. But not guaranteed you'll have to face that. Someone who has done that particular model, year, etc. before will have a rough idea what that will be. You will be on a mission of discovery. But, given the wide different number of models, and changes to models over the years, and lack of experience by some pros, you will be doing the same as them, only slower.

You can do it all though but it isn't an easy job - usually. You may luck out. You might be able to hire someone to do a particularly hard part. Good luck.
Thnx for the response, and though this is helpful, I was really hoping to get a response from someone whos familiar with these old classic hatteras and their flybridge installation. Even Hatteras cant tell me much, other than its not designed to be removed, once its installed, due to the marine adhesive thats used to glue it down, and Im not sure if this used just on the perimeter, or if its used throughout the floor, if it even has a floor as part of the mold. Im not getting answers on that either, lol. Thnx again
__________________
wildmountainman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2015, 11:11   #4
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Anacortes
Boat: previous - Whitby 42 new - Goldenwave 44
Posts: 1,735
Re: Flybridge removal

I understand your situation. The "not knowing" is the same problem faced by anyone who has to do this job. An the adhesives are not meant to be removed so damage of some sort is inevitable, may be even major surgery and reconstruction. The big power boat that fell over and partially sunk while it was being launched the first time here in Anacortes, they used sawzalls to just cut off the supports and then used a crane to remove that. Good luck.
__________________
exMaggieDrum is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
removal

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
O'Day 30 table removal and settee removal biker6977 Construction, Maintenance & Refit 2 25-09-2014 09:40
440: Lagoon 440 Weight, Height, Flybridge Etienne Lagoon Catamarans 242 05-02-2011 19:07
For Sale: Jaguar 57 Flybridge Motoryacht simonmd Classifieds Archive 1 14-12-2010 16:47
Flybridge / Cabin Top Flex - 41' Defever hankster2 Powered Boats 1 22-08-2010 15:41



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 21:58.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.