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Old 27-03-2010, 19:51   #46
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My vote would have to be with the Pearson Aerial. We had one in our family for years (my dad owned it and I inherited it when he passed). Hull is built like a rock. Broke anchor during Hurricane Francis and ended up on the shore. No damage to the hull whatsoever. Just some topside and rudder damage that had to be attended to. I honestly think that it had more storage space than the Ericson 35' that I currently sail. Has an enclosed head, also. Went to both the Bahamas and Keys in her. Part of me wishes I hadn't sold her but then my crew these days consists of 5 people so she was getting a bit crowded. Great little boat.
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Old 27-03-2010, 19:57   #47
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Oldsalt - correct - the Contessa was not named Contessa when made on your shore of the Pond, was she? What was it? Taylor?

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Old 28-03-2010, 07:21   #48
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Saying "several have circumnavigated" is like saying "anybody can do it". Simply, not the case...
You raise a good point… so much of this discussion offers opportunity for a collision of philosophies, not unlike the mono-v-multi discussions (or; heavy-v-light, fin-keel-v-long, luxurious-v-austere, etc., etc…); neither wrong and both having their success stories, but generally requiring deferent points of view to (ultimately) get to “yes…”

The smaller sailor is often budget limited, but not always… and the relevant question often hinges on “can I do it” with what I’ve got… The little Flickas (and the larger sister Dana, as well as the elusive Allegra and a few others) were designed for those who’s means might allow a larger craft, but desired to sail in the small… clearly not mainstream way of sailing life (and as history has shown, not as economically viable as it might have been, had the manufacturer concentrated on larger craft…), but acceptable in some circles nonetheless…

What vessel is too big, too small and/or merely a stunt often hinges on one’s philosophy… so long as one is safe (again, open to discussion… but let’s just say the skipper means acceptable, knowledgeable risk) and plans accordingly, questions of confidence, speed and passagemaking comfort will fall into place…

It is so true that saying “several have [whatever]…” doesn’t take into account the less modern, accepted or popular vessel, route, speed or myriad other factors important to some sailors, but perhaps less so to another skipper, and maybe naively ignored by those of us of the rocking-chair-sailor motif… but it makes for a good and lively conversation all the same...
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Old 28-03-2010, 21:46   #49
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In looking through the thread, I do not think anyone address his Cat 27 question. As a previous owner of a 27, yes the design is good, but I felt the build was not up to offshore work. There are several reasons for this, but no I would not sail past the bay with a Cat 27. There are many previous threads discussing this boat.
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Old 28-03-2010, 22:36   #50
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Originally Posted by SVMorningStar View Post
My vote would have to be with the Pearson Aerial. We had one in our family for years (my dad owned it and I inherited it when he passed). Hull is built like a rock. Broke anchor during Hurricane Francis and ended up on the shore. No damage to the hull whatsoever. Just some topside and rudder damage that had to be attended to. I honestly think that it had more storage space than the Ericson 35' that I currently sail. Has an enclosed head, also. Went to both the Bahamas and Keys in her. Part of me wishes I hadn't sold her but then my crew these days consists of 5 people so she was getting a bit crowded. Great little boat.
Always nice to hear others who have had the same experience. Yes, and Ariel would be a bit 'tight' for 5. What hull number did you have / what was her name?
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Old 28-03-2010, 23:04   #51
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Wow, I love this discussion. I own a 1978 Pearson 26 and I think it's an extremely comfortable and stable cruising boat for its size. I don't have much experience with most of the other boats mentioned here but I'd say the P 26 would stack up pretty well. I picked mine for 3k two years back, very complete and with a nice outboard. I am planning a cruise up the Maine coast this summer and hope to go much farther some day.
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Old 29-03-2010, 07:14   #52
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I too would like to know details of any Flicas that have circumnavigated,i have not heard of any,i do know of a ferro cement Flica named Sweet Thursday which was built in New Zealand by an american and sailed home to Portland,OR in the early 70s.
If anyone is interested in a reasonably priced Flica i just discovered one on the Duluth, mn Craigs list for $7900,its not a pacific seacraft as it says custom built and looks ok in the pictures,it is on a trailer,may be worth a look.
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Old 29-03-2010, 07:49   #53
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I too would like to know details of any Flicas that have circumnavigated,i have not heard of any,i do know of a ferro cement Flica named Sweet Thursday which was built in New Zealand by an american and sailed home to Portland,OR in the early 70s.
If anyone is interested in a reasonably priced Flica i just discovered one on the Duluth, mn Craigs list for $7900,its not a pacific seacraft as it says custom built and looks ok in the pictures,it is on a trailer,may be worth a look.
Steve.

The Flicka was drawn to be built in Fero cement. I heard it as a rumor, and confirmed it with Bruce Bingham himself. Learn all you ever wanted to know about them at here at their owners site. (OBTW, it is "Flicka" not "Flica"). Not that I am the spelling police....
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Old 29-03-2010, 08:13   #54
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The Flicka was drawn to be built in Fero cement...
I’ve tracked Bingham and the Flicka from back when he and Katie were still an item… Ferocement was indeed one of the materials envisioned, but if memory serves plans for FC were offered coincident with glass – both C-Flex and foam/balsa core (not sure, but I think strip-plank was also an option, but memory fails…). She was my dream-boat way back then and I meant to get a set of plans, but then PSC bought the rights (good for Bruce, but bad for DIY types…) and the plans dried up and the whole philosophy moved uptown… am pleased to see plans may be offered again, but these days Glen-L, Roberts, Welsford, Benford and others have filled the gap that was once pretty much owned by Bingham – the contemporary DIY tabloid-cruiser with passable potential for blue-water sailing.
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Old 29-03-2010, 09:04   #55
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Yes, you are right - I have not sailed a Flicka round the world. I have sailed an Allegro 27. (26', 3000 kg, light).

Yes, I consider a 18' LWL boat very small for a safe circumnavigation. Yes - I consider a 18' LWL, 5500 boat a pig.

Yes, I know something about the Flicka. Flicka means a little girl in Swedish, Sweden is where my own boat comes from. She (Flicka) has 31% ballast ratio, which I consider low for ocean crossing purposes in this size range.

Please do not jump to conclusions. Please speak from your experience.

"Several have circumnavigated". Possibly so. PLS direct the guy who posted the original question to some of the several circumnavigation records - so that they can get some understanding of the level of comfort / safety they will experience.

Enough said, I have sailed a 26 footer (3000 kg = 6600 lbs) with 26 LWL and consider such a craft only marginally acceptable for a circumnavigation on the easiest of the routes (given my sailing experience and my share of good luck).

If you disagree, prob noblem. Just please provide some hard data to make your point. Saying "several have circumnavigated" is like saying "anybody can do it". Simply, not the case.

Hugs and regards,
barnie

You're original quote is:
"Flicka - too small (if she is 20 as the name suggests)"

This infers that you knew nothing about the boat, and used Wikipedia and Google since to brush up on her. That you learned that her name is of Swedish descent really has no bearing on this at all, so I don't know where that came from. You simply dismissed it based on the size, because YOU wouldn't consider a boat of that size for the task. But just because you wouldn't consider a boat of that size doesn't mean a younger and more vigorous person might find it very adequate.

Anyone with any experience understands that a 20 foot boat is going to be rough going. There's certainly no hidden secret there. But she can get the job done none-the-less.
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Old 29-03-2010, 11:57   #56
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Wow, I love this discussion. I own a 1978 Pearson 26 and I think it's an extremely comfortable and stable cruising boat for its size. I don't have much experience with most of the other boats mentioned here but I'd say the P 26 would stack up pretty well. I picked mine for 3k two years back, very complete and with a nice outboard. I am planning a cruise up the Maine coast this summer and hope to go much farther some day.

Orange,

I wouldn't want to be far offshore in a P26. I used to own one and they are a goood sailing boats to be sure, but they were simply never intended to be a long distance voyagers.

They are much too light to have any kind of load carrying capacity - not that you could get much stores in them. The fiberglass pan liner used throughout, in addition to the shallow bilge area, makes loading them with much impossible.

The deck is attached to the hull with an outward turning flange that is pop rivited together, which makes for a lightly constructed joint that is suceptible to damage when docking and is all but impossible to make watertight. There is little available tankage, no bridgedeck and no ventilation to speak of.... I could go on, but the short story is the P26 was built to be sailed as a coastal cruiser.

Again, I'm not trying to be critical of the boat - my wife and I had some great times in ours, but we would have never considered taking it offshore. It just doesn't stack up to some of the boats already mentioned that were built with bluewater in mind - the Nor'Sea, Vancouver, Pacific Seacraft, Cape Dory or Contessa
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Old 29-03-2010, 15:05   #57
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My first proper boat was a Mirror Offshore all 18 foot of her, someone sailed one across the atlantic quite successfully only reported problem was with the deck join letting water in (a rivited join). Personally I wouldn't take one more the 15 miles offshore, too small a rig, three keels, etc etc, but someone did it.
I have a Vancouver 27 that circumnavigated 1990 to 1993. This boat was designed to sail across oceans and can handle pretty much whatever weather is thrown at her (however when I'm aboard and having to 'hang on' because it is a bit rough it doesen't take away the fear factor of that rouge wave etc).
Just make sure you select a boat that ticks all the boxes for offshore and your own personal requirements, make sure she is soundly seaworthy and if you feel your confident to take her offshore then do it.
The guy in the Mirror offshore did, so can you, but I guess with the information and resources available to you through this site and others plus GPS and all the other aids to sailing some of which you will take and others you won't, you will be able to do it.
My tip to you is...... get your boat ASAP but don't buy the first one you see (the emotion often misguides). Fix it up as soon as you can but set a depart date as the to do list allways gets longer (trust me on this I've had my current boat 5 years and the to do list is stil 2 pages ) and then cut the strings and go, you can live really cheaply on the water compared to the land. Do It, Do It Now !!!
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Old 29-03-2010, 20:41   #58
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The Flicka was drawn to be built in Fero cement. I heard it as a rumor, and confirmed it with Bruce Bingham himself. Learn all you ever wanted to know about them at here at their owners site. (OBTW, it is "Flicka" not "Flica"). Not that I am the spelling police....
Sorry about mispelling Flicka ,i thought it didnt quite look right.
About 25yrs ago i built a seaflex Allegra 24 hull for a customer which is a Fred Bingham design and very much an enlarged Flicka,the customer went on to do a beutifull job finishing it off.(OBTW,it is ferro cement,not fero cement) Not that i am the spelling police.
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Old 29-03-2010, 22:29   #59
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Sorry about mispelling Flicka ,i thought it didnt quite look right.
About 25yrs ago i built a seaflex Allegra 24 hull for a customer which is a Fred Bingham design and very much an enlarged Flicka,the customer went on to do a beutifull job finishing it off.(OBTW,it is ferro cement,not fero cement) Not that i am the spelling police.
Steve.

Thanks Steve. I really should never do that.... ever.

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Old 29-03-2010, 23:00   #60
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Try looking at atomvoyages.com There is a list of capable boats on that site. James Baldwin has 2 circums under his belt and can be consulted to help you prepare a small boat for sailing offshore.
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