Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 26-02-2016, 09:29   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 28
Does this make sense?

I am an experienced beginner sailor. ASA 101-103, US Sailing 101, lot's of lake experience with Sunfish up to 19 foot Flying Scots, and bluewater experience helping my brother sail a 32 Catalina from the Abacos back to Merritt Island, Florida across the Gulf Stream. I am ready to buy my first sailboat. My ideal would be to get a 26-28 monohull that I could single hand on Lake Erie (1 1/2 hour away) or the Chesapeake (4 hours away). I am 58 and still working so my time on the water would be limited. It seems my next best option would be to pick up a trailer sailor like a West Wite Potter or Com-Pac that I could sail on the local lakes on the weekend then out to the Great Lakes or Chesapeake when I have more time. I do contract work so I do get the occasional "sabbatical" that gives me a few months of down time between gigs where I could get some serious sailing experience in. I know that the best way to learn is to get more time on the water. My question is does the trailer sailor make sense and how hard would it be to sell in a few years to upgrade to a bluewater boat? Could I do some limited coastal cruising (Erie, PA to Detroit, MI or Punta Gorda to the Keys) in a West Wite Potter or Com Pac? Thanks!
__________________

__________________
medevicerep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-02-2016, 13:26   #2
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Boat: Hunnter Legend 37.5
Posts: 166
Re: Does this make sense?

This was just talked about on this forum. Here is a link, and I will apologize if I do this wrong:
Trailer-sailers costs Vs fixed moorings

Trailer-sailers costs Vs fixed moorings

Now with that out of the way, I have done both, trailer sailed a Chrysler mutineer for years, and then when hurricane sandy slammed a tree on my baby, I bought a Hunter 37.5 legend. Hands down, the 37.5 was the best decision. Since you are already an accomplished dinghy Sailor, you already know the "feel". Big boats are WAY more forgiving. You will have no issues single handing a 30ish foot boat. Get the big boat, and day goodbye to sail camping. You'll love it!

Ben



Sent from my XT1254 using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
__________________

__________________
bensolomon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-02-2016, 13:28   #3
Registered User
 
Orion Jim's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Noank, Ct. USA
Boat: Cape Dory 31
Posts: 1,075
Images: 6
Re: Does this make sense?

If you are expecting to purchase a bluewater capable cruiser in a few years I'd spend the least amount of cash possible on a trailer sailer since you want to sail in widespread areas. No sense spending your cruising kitty on a keelboat you don't intend to keep.
__________________
Orion Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-02-2016, 13:58   #4
Moderator
 
Don C L's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Channel Islands, CA
Boat: 1962 Columbia 29 MK 1 #37
Posts: 4,395
Images: 34
Re: Does this make sense?

I'd choose something more like a Catalina 22 on a trailer. It will be more fun, you can poke around Chesapeake or the lake and even overnight in it, and it will probably bring you a better percentage of purchase back when you sell.
__________________
DL
Pythagoras
1962 Columbia 29 MKI #37
Don C L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-02-2016, 15:26   #5
Senior Cruiser
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 11,461
Re: Does this make sense?

As a general rule, if one buys a popular design, like a CAtalina 22, that is a decade or so old and in good condition, then maintains it reasonably, one can expect to not loose too much on resale. This means NOT buying the cheapest one around, for that nearly always means having to spend money to make it usable, and that money is seldom recoverable.

There are running expenses, of course, and those are not recoverable, either... just the cost of yachting!

Jim
__________________
Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II , lying Port Cygnet, Tasmania once again
Jim Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2016, 08:38   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Abaco, Bahamas/ Western NC
Boat: Nothing large at the moment
Posts: 820
Re: Does this make sense?

The West Write and Compac are cute but don't sail worth a toot. The Catalina sails great and is less expensive, you might also consider an Erickson 25 if you can find one. Both are easily trailered.
__________________
Tingum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2016, 08:41   #7
Senior Cruiser
 
seasick's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bend, OR
Boat: Brewer designed Pacific 43 in fiberglass. Center cockpit set up for long-distance single handing.
Posts: 430
Re: Does this make sense?

Hello Medevicerep, I highly recommend the Oday 25. It is known as a "little big boat." you can pick them up for a very reasonable price. They use internal ballast with a light retractable centerboard as opposed to a lifting keel. They are roomy and sail and feel like a much larger vessel. Research them.
__________________
seasick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2016, 08:56   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Daytona Beach, Fl
Boat: Irwin 38 Mk II CC 38'
Posts: 253
Send a message via Skype™ to PuttingDoctor
Re: Does this make sense?

I would suggest looking around home for a club that sails AND races. Find the class of boat that appeals to you that can trailer. But make sure you get out to the races. The compressed learn by doing will show you where your ASA training has helped or left you short. The handicap racing or class racing at most clubs will reveal boats for sale as well. Some will be bargain priced as others move on or up in class. You can't beat the friendships you'll make along the way.
__________________
s/v Sea Castle II
POC: Toronto, ON
PuttingDoctor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2016, 09:40   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Homeport: Oswego, NY
Boat: 1993 Sabre 362 #113
Posts: 351
Re: Does this make sense?

It hasn't been mentioned yet, but do you have a vehicle to tow the boat?

As others have said, the West Wright Potter and Compac are cute little boats, but they are slow. If you are only sailing on inland lakes it won't make much difference, but if you head to Lake Erie and want to cover some distance, the slow boats will not be as much fun. When cruising a knot of boat speed can make a big difference, a short 12 mile sail will take 4 hours at 3 knots, 3 hours at 4 knots, and 2.5 hours at 5 knots.

Also think comfort at anchor or at a dock, can you stretch out? How easy is it to put your pants on? Storage room? And where is the portapottie, most likely under the v-berth. I'll leave that arrangement to your imagination.

My first boat was a Tanzer 22 and we sailed it all over eastern Lake Ontario. A great little boat, reasonably comfortable, way over built and strong. Also a faster boat than the O'Day or Catalina 22.

The next boat was a Sabre 30. A much more comfortable boat and still one that can be single handed.

A boat that is 90 minutes away will get used more than one 4 hours away.
__________________
Dave Lochner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2016, 09:55   #10
Senior Cruiser
 
akprb's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Alaska
Boat: Hunter Legend 40.5
Posts: 515
Re: Does this make sense?

I agree with PuttingDoctor. Finding a class boat that is popular in your local area already has a built in local resale market. Racing is the fastest way to develop skills and the muscle memory you want when things go bad fast. You will have seen a lot even in one short season of racing and will have pushed your boat (or some else's) to it's limits and beyond. He's also correct in that if it is a PHRF fleet there will be many different boats racing and you'll quickly find out which are for sale and which are good boats to meet your goals.

Bensolomn-yes the Hunter Legend series is a gem in their line :-)
__________________
www.sailingohana.com

"Take it all in, it's as big as it seems, count all your blessings, remember your dreams" JB
akprb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2016, 09:59   #11
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2014
Location: So Cal
Boat: Beneteau 38 Nordlund 72, Marquess 55, Jenneau 49
Posts: 286
Re: Does this make sense?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
I'd choose something more like a Catalina 22 on a trailer. It will be more fun, you can poke around Chesapeake or the lake and even overnight in it, and it will probably bring you a better percentage of purchase back when you sell.
I second that. This sails more like what you would expect of a bigger boat than a WW Potter or Mcgregor
__________________
Valmika is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2016, 10:19   #12
Registered User
 
Stu Jackson's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Cowichan Bay, BC (Maple Bay Marina)
Posts: 6,389
Re: Does this make sense?

The "trick" with sailing a Catalina 22, or at least staying overnight on it is to avoid using the V berth for sleeping (keep it clear to use the portapotie).

Here's how it works: you put the table down, build a piece of plywood to span between the inboard edge of the table and the starboard side when the galley is slid away aft, put fiddles on the bottom side, take the back cushions off the dinette and put them on plywood and you have a great big berth!

You can store the plywood back in the quarterberth area.

We used our C22 as a lake sailor during the summers for many seasons. The boat stayed in the water, we came up to the boat every weekend and some long weekends and stayed on the boat quite comfortably.

The C22 is a good value, There's an active owners association on the web, and Catalina sailboats world headquarters. Owner resources, parts, accessories, boats for sale, and more. has an active group there, too.
__________________
Stu Jackson
Catalina 34 #224 (1986) C34IA Secretary
Cowichan Bay, BC, (Maple Bay Marina) SR/FK, M25, Rocna 10 (22#) (NZ model)
Stu Jackson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2016, 11:56   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 2,105
Re: Does this make sense?

The Potter is actually a seaworthy boat. They have done trans atlantic crossings. Bit cramp but well made. And the name is West Wright Potter. Quite a fan club out there for these unusual sailing vessels.
__________________
reed1v is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2016, 14:11   #14
Registered User
 
hamburking's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Kingston Ont Canada
Boat: Looking for my next boat!
Posts: 2,149
Re: Does this make sense?

I also suggest forget about the trailer sailor...lots of work to go camping in a little boat.

You are ideally situated. There are great deals on older boats to be had on Lake Erie, and the fresh water boats are usually in much better condition than the salty boats. IMHO, the Cleveland area has excellent (low) prices on used boats.

You can explore Lake Erie, and when you are ready there are so many options...take the Welland canal and explore Lake Ontario and the 1000 islands, or head north past Detroit, Lake St Clair and into Lake Huron/Georgian Bay and the 10,000 islands/North Channel...incredible. And when you are ready, take the Erie Canal to the Hudson river (This is the only one where you need to pull the stick) and head to the east coast, ICW, Florida, Bahamas, Bermuda and beyond.

Here's a few boats on Lake Erie:
1980 AMF Paceship sloop sailboat for sale in Ohio
1986 Caliber sailboat for sale in Ohio

Remember, those are just the asking prices.

And if you find a boat on the Canadian side...what a bargain with the low canadian dollar:

Bridge Yachts Ltd. (Port Dover, ON)

If you have "sabbaticals" once in a while, what better way to enjoy them than on your own boat. Enjoy.
__________________
hamburking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2016, 14:27   #15
Registered User
 
hamburking's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Kingston Ont Canada
Boat: Looking for my next boat!
Posts: 2,149
Re: Does this make sense?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Lochner View Post
My first boat was a Tanzer 22 and we sailed it all over eastern Lake Ontario. A great little boat, reasonably comfortable, way over built and strong. Also a faster boat than the O'Day or Catalina 22.
+1 for Tanzer 22. I had one and it was fun on a bun! A bit cramped below, but I was young and did not care.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	t22.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	18.7 KB
ID:	119691  
__________________

__________________
hamburking is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Does A Liferaft Still Make Sense? (or Cents?) robertsapp Health, Safety & Related Gear 89 02-06-2015 21:32
Problems with reverse gear, does it make sense to have two ooutboards. pskudlarski Engines and Propulsion Systems 17 05-11-2014 07:54
When Does Buying New Make Sense? BWB75 General Sailing Forum 26 18-05-2014 08:46
300W 36V panel with MPPT controller for a 12V bank: does it make sense? Wellington Electrical: Batteries, Generators & Solar 30 11-06-2013 22:01
Does this make sense? Doodles Anchoring & Mooring 3 12-06-2012 15:44



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 23:04.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.