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Old 03-09-2005, 09:54   #1
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NZ Maritme requirments

Any NZ registered Pleasure craft sailing offshore have always had to meet the NZ Maritime Transport Act, section 21 requirement, that the "pleasure craft and it's safety equipment are adequate for the voyage and that the vessel is adequately crewed for the voyage".
As of August 1st, this law has been extended to include any foriegn flagged vessel leaving NZ. Although they are Yachting NZ Rules, they are identical to ISAF rules were ever possible, but go a step further in being applicable to Cruising yachts and multihulls.
So beware any vessel that may sail to NZ, that you may do so with little in the way of safety equipment or seaworthyness of your vessel, but you will be required to come up to the Cat 1 regulations before being allowed to leave again.
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Old 03-09-2005, 15:30   #2
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NZ regs

All my attempts to get the Category one requirements have failed.
I emailed several places / folks in NZ including the folks that are in charge, and no one sent any info to me.
Could be you have to pay to get it, but you would think a yacht broker or such would have some idea of what is required and pass it on.
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Old 03-09-2005, 20:40   #3
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Yes it's NZ$30.00 for the book. It is called the Yachting NZ Racing Rules of Sailing & Safety Regulations 2005-2008. The easiest way to get them is from Chandleries. If you go to www.oddiesmarine.co.nz , David Oddie, (a good mate of mine) would be happy to send you one. You will be able to pay online by card.
If you have difficulty, let me know and I will sort it out for you.
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Old 03-09-2005, 22:59   #4
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As a matter of reference to my previous post, I consider that completely reasonable. And considering NZ's reputation as a very cruiser friendly destination, it seems like a small price to pay.
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Old 04-09-2005, 00:55   #5
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Yes I agree. There are a few that don't think so, but they are failing to understand what it actually all means. If they read all the wording as per Black and White, then they get all flustered. For anyone actually racing, all the requirments are legally required anyway, by either YNZ, ISAF or RORC. It's just that YNZ extend these requirments to pleasure craft NOT in a Race. The first legal requirment is tus.
"The Safety of a yacht and her crew is the sole and inescapable responsibilty of the Skipper who must do his/her best to ensure that the Yacht is fully found, thoroughly seaworthy and manned by an experianced crew who are physically fit to face bad weather.
The resposibilities of the Skipper goes on, but the above encompases the responsibilty required.
We have one argument in NZ right now, where a couple have read the "black & white" aspect of the wording. One rule is that a keel bolt may be required to be withdrawn for inspection. This couple have argued that their boat is under 10yrs and after 4000 of these boats have never had an issue, why should they have to spend what could be thousands to have a bolt withdrawn. But they have failed to understand that the possible requirment of a bolt needing to be withdrawn is considered if necessary by the inspector and he would only ask for one to be withdrawn if he has seen something that has given him reason for concern.

The inspection is carried out by a very competent examiner. there are only 46 in the country that hold the qualification and they are very highly qualified, all being experianced sailors, with design and building in addition.
The fee is NZ$100.00 for a 3hr examination of the vessel. It undergoes an examination probably more stringent than a surveyor would give, Plus the examiner gives advice. For that price, I think it is comforting to know if your boat is well found or not.
Plus, It isn't a simple Pass/fail type exam. The rules are not strictly adheard to, in as much as, an article in the rule book may stipulate a device for a safety requirement, but if the boat has an alternative safety device that meets or goes beyond the requirment, then it will be deemed as a pass for that area.
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Old 04-09-2005, 01:10   #6
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100 bucks for a survey! Sign me up I guess the reasonable arguement would be if these regulations were written by people who did not know the type of vessels thay were legislating, but it does not sound like this is the case.
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Old 04-09-2005, 02:11   #7
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After discussing this subject with my wife, an interesting point came to mind. We sold a wooden boat a few years ago. THe buyers picked a surveyor, with good qualifications (on paper). The surveyor demanded to remove fasteners. I explained that this was no small task, as the boat was copper riveted. The boat weighed 9 tons, and had a 3GM30 Yanmar for power. Based on these 2 issues, he gave the vessel a very poor rating.
First, he was unfamiliar with copper rivets, so he thought I was hiding something. (I could not make it clear to him what was involved with removing a copper rivet), and second, based on my information coming from a number of very reliable sources (other surveyors, engine manufacturers etc.) 3 HP per ton is sufficent power for an auxiliary sail boat. He stated a need for 60hp plus for a vessel of this size (34').
My point is that often "qualified" is subjective. Based on your description, I would imagine that the inspectors in NZ are a bit more familiar with their trade, but I would hate to be forced to remove a copper rivet, and have to re-rivet in order to pass an inspection. especially since, I have never heard of a copper rivet failing.
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Old 04-09-2005, 02:17   #8
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Do you know if they allow rope (spectra) life lines? Cat 1 races do not.
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Old 04-09-2005, 06:55   #9
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Hi Paul, I don't think so. Here are the actual rules.
Lifelines, Stanchions and Pulpits
(This covers all race catergories of Cat 1-5)
7.21 The minimum diameter lifeline wire shall be
Yachts under 8.5m (LOA) 3mm
8.5m - 13m 4mm
over 13m 5mm
Wire manufactured with a plastic coating shall not be used
Grade 316 SST wire recommended - 1x19 or 7x7
The wire shall show no significant signs of corrosion or weathering. When plastic tubing is used it should be cut at it's lowest point to allow water to drain.
7.22 Lifelines shall be taut. As a guide, when a deflecting force of 50N (5Kg) is applied toa lifeline midway between supports, the lifeline must not deflect more than 50mm.
For Keelyachts
7.23a lifeline termninals. A lanyard of synthetic rope may be used to secure lifelines, provided that when in position it's length does not exceed 100mm and that sufficient turns are used to maintain strength.

Paul, the only other references are to Jack stays.

7.23e Jackstays shall be fitted on deck, port and starboard of the cnetre line to provide secure attachments for safety harnesses. Jackstays shall be attached to through bolted or welded deck plates, or other suitable and strong anchorages. Eyebolts ARE NOT acceptable. The Jackstay shall be fitted in such a way that a crew member, whenclipped on, can move from a cockpit to the forward end and to the aft end of the main deck without unclipping the harness. If the deck layout renders this impossible , additional lines shall be fitted so as the crew member can move as described with the minimum of unclipping operations. A crew member must be able to clip on before con deck, unclip after going below and remain clipped on while moving laterally across the yacht and on the fordeck, the afterdeck and amidships. If necessary, additional jackstays and /or through bolted or welded anchorage points must be provided for this purpose.

There is one other reference to double lifelines and their spacings on keelyachts 28ft and over an single on under 28ft

And-although the Jackstays can be 1x19 wire, it is prefered that they be webbing with a rating of 2000Kg (4000lb), so as they lay flat on the deck so as to inimise the risk of trips and slips.

Hope this helps.
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Old 04-09-2005, 23:21   #10
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I'm curious, if one sails into NZ waters and fails the inspection, may one then simply sail out of NZ waters without putting the boat into the specified shape?
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Old 05-09-2005, 02:25   #11
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Leaving

You would have left a country illegaly and you are not supposed to do that.
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Old 05-09-2005, 21:58   #12
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I guess it really depends on the regulations. I would want to know if I have a previously undiagnosed safety issue, and would not wat ot head out without repairing it, however, if the issue was the distance between stansions installed by the manufacturer, or something equally subjective, I would have a problem with it. I could certainly see this being abused to generate revenue for NZ, however, this does not sound like the case by the info given so far.
What I am curious about is how the visa is handled. Say a wooden vessel is found to have issues with the fasteners. Not a quick fix, and often one that would require a haul out, and weeks or months to fix. Would NZ extend a visa for the period required to make these repairs? To expand, what if the problem requires a fix beyond the financial capabilities of the owner?
As I said before, NZ has a very good reputation as a cruiser friendly country, so I am sure provisions for such things are in place, but I would hate to sail in on a 40 year old vessel, and be told that I have to leave in six weeks, but my vessel will require a $50,000.00 refastening.
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Old 06-09-2005, 00:06   #13
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ISAF Special Regulations for Offshore Sailing

You can download PDFs of the ISAF's Special Regulations for Offshore Sailing from http://www.isaf.org/specialregs/ .

Within these regs, Category 1 is defined as: "Races of long distance and well offshore, where yachts must be completely self-sufficient for extended periods of time, capable of withstanding heavy storms and prepared to meet serious emergencies without the expectation of outside assistance."

Substitute "cruises" for "races" and "cruising" for "racing" if you like.

Certainly, I find it useful to refer to these regulations as I am overhauling and outfitting my cruising boat.

Regards,

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Old 06-09-2005, 00:46   #14
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Thanks Tim. Great link. A lot of reading to do.
I wonder if any of these regulations conflict with regulations in other countries? Or for that matter, do any other countries have such regulations to be imposed on foreign registered vessels?
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Old 06-09-2005, 06:50   #15
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And for powerboats....

Do these requirements also apply to trawler yacht type vessels(no sails)?
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