Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 26-02-2015, 23:20   #31
Registered User
 
FamilyVan's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,779
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roverhi View Post
Tried the Boye folder at the Boat Show. That knife cuts dacron like it was butter. Was truly impressed with its cutting ability compared to my Myerchin and ceramic knifes I've got. Just can't talk myself into spending 1 1/2 big ones for a knife but I came damn close.

FWIW, friend was on a hotshot racing boat with all the latest and greatest in running rigging when a chain plate failed and they lost the rig. Had no problem getting the standing rigging free by pulling the pins on the turnbuckles. They had some very tight jaws moments cutting through the high tech running rigging with the mast banging against the hull. They went through every knife they had on board as all the blades dulled almost immediately when they tried cutting the line. He said it was like cutting down a tree with a dull knife. None of the knives were Boyes though didn't find out who made the knives that they had.
Hot shot racing boat that didn't have a hacksaw on board? A pound well saved.
__________________

__________________
FamilyVan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-02-2015, 23:37   #32
Marine Service Provider

Join Date: May 2012
Location: New Orleans
Boat: We have a problem... A serious addiction issue.
Posts: 3,940
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roverhi View Post
Tried the Boye folder at the Boat Show. That knife cuts dacron like it was butter. Was truly impressed with its cutting ability compared to my Myerchin and ceramic knifes I've got. Just can't talk myself into spending 1 1/2 big ones for a knife but I came damn close.

FWIW, friend was on a hotshot racing boat with all the latest and greatest in running rigging when a chain plate failed and they lost the rig. Had no problem getting the standing rigging free by pulling the pins on the turnbuckles. They had some very tight jaws moments cutting through the high tech running rigging with the mast banging against the hull. They went through every knife they had on board as all the blades dulled almost immediately when they tried cutting the line. He said it was like cutting down a tree with a dull knife. None of the knives were Boyes though didn't find out who made the knives that they had.
This is exactly why I wanted to make the switch to ceramic knives. Dyneema specifically, and most of the new high tech lines are incredibly cut resistant. Dyneema and Kevlar are actually used to make cut resistant gloves certified by OSHA. These fibers dull steel knives incredibly quickly, while ceramics keep an edge much longer.
__________________

__________________
Greg

- If animals weren't meant to be eaten then they wouldn't be made of food.
Stumble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2015, 00:32   #33
Registered User
 
Suijin's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Annapolis MD; currently in Oriental NC
Boat: Valiant 40
Posts: 2,886
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumble View Post
This is exactly why I wanted to make the switch to ceramic knives. Dyneema specifically, and most of the new high tech lines are incredibly cut resistant. Dyneema and Kevlar are actually used to make cut resistant gloves certified by OSHA. These fibers dull steel knives incredibly quickly, while ceramics keep an edge much longer.
FYI the Boye cuts through dynamo and kevlar very easily. Beyond the serrations, the blade material itself has micro-serrations due to it's granularity which gives it it's cutting ability.

Also they're not $300 like someone said, more like $150. But they'll last longer than four $40 folders I bet.
__________________
Suijin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2015, 00:41   #34
Moderator
 
carstenb's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Copenhagen
Boat: Jeanneau Sun Fast 40.3
Posts: 4,936
Images: 1
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumble View Post
I have been meaning to do a long term review of the knife I have been carrying for the last six months. Riggers with Marlin Spike | Ceramic Knife.org I will try to get to it, but in short this is by far the best knife I have ever carried. The ceramic blade stays sharp despite being used to make lots of cuts in dyneema. Everything else is high quality 316L stainless, and frankly it is pretty. Even my wife likes the way it looks.

I wouldn't hit it with a hammer, but I also haven't tried to cut anything (including 3/4" nylon) that needed to be sawn at. Just light preassure across the line and everything slices in half.
This is what I have and carry. Like Greg I have yet to find anything it won't cut through like a hot knife going through butter (pardon the expression)

But I also have sheath knives paced at various points around the boat where they might come in handy, by the mast, in the cockpit etc.
__________________
I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted - Elmore Leonard
carstenb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2015, 01:57   #35
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 19,737
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumble View Post
I have been meaning to do a long term review of the knife I have been carrying for the last six months. Riggers with Marlin Spike | Ceramic Knife.org I will try to get to it, but in short this is by far the best knife I have ever carried. The ceramic blade stays sharp despite being used to make lots of cuts in dyneema. Everything else is high quality 316L stainless, and frankly it is pretty. Even my wife likes the way it looks.

I wouldn't hit it with a hammer, but I also haven't tried to cut anything (including 3/4" nylon) that needed to be sawn at. Just light preassure across the line and everything slices in half.
Looks like the dog's b's, for us non-knife guys. I would probably whip the handle, though.
__________________
Dockhead is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2015, 06:19   #36
Registered User
 
SailingBo's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: US Gulf Coast
Boat: Brewer 42
Posts: 14
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

I have a few Spyderco Salt knives that I love.

One has been strapped to my mizzenmast for over a year, rain & shine, and only has a tiny rust spot where the logo was etched on the side of the blade.

My every day carry is a straight edge, but when I'm sailing I clip on the serrated. Love these knives.
__________________
Sailing B+A
SailingBo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2015, 06:43   #37
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Pensacola Florida
Boat: Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 40
Posts: 174
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

I love Spyderco knives and have been carrying them for years. They appear to be composed of very inexpensive parts, but I've never had one fail in any way. They have a vigorously protected patent on - the circular hole! That's why you don't see other knives with a circular opening hole unless they've paid a royalty to Spyderco. I've never found any other opening hole to work as well, although the Boye is not bad; I despise knives with opening studs and will not own one.

As for serrated vs. plain edge, I won't have a serrated knife in the galley, but all my carry knives are either full or half serrated. When I need to cut something fast, I don't care about a clean edge.

In my earlier post I forgot to mention that I have CRKT belt cutter knives attached to our life jackets in case we need to cut ourselves free in an emergency. I believe they are now discontinued, but they and some knock-offs are still available on eBay. I think every life jacket should have one.

I sometimes wear a fixed blade dive knife on my belt, but usually I prefer a Boye or Spyderco folder in a zipped pocket. I do like the strength of a fixed blade, but I'm not ready to pony up for the Boye and have not researched others. Dropping a $150.00 knife overboard would make me cry, but dropping a $350.00 knife would make me try to set a deep diving record.

I've always got a multi-tool handy in the cars and in the ditch bag, but as they say, a multi-tool is the worst tool in the world other than no tool at all!

I think that covers my edged items except for a few sharp pointed things that are, "dual use."

Fair winds,

Leo
__________________
Leo Ticheli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2015, 07:11   #38
Registered User
 
ryon's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Southern California
Posts: 588
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenomac View Post
We have several Cutco drop point serrated knives on board. Some with orange handles, some black. They cut through line and rope like butter and have a lifetime warranty that includes lifetime sharpening. One swipe and even one inch and inch & 1/2 rope is cut easily.


That's not a drop-point knife. THIS is a drop-point sheepsfooted knife:

__________________
ryon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2015, 07:17   #39
Registered User
 
denverd0n's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 3,949
Images: 6
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wotname View Post
...and keep the blade honed between each sharpening with a fine (or very fine) steel.
This is the key, and simply CANNOT be over-emphasized!

Unless you are abusing it, you should not need to sharpen the knife more than a couple of times a year. For a knife that is only used occasionally, sharpening every couple of years is probably enough. But you MUST swipe it across a steel after every couple of uses! You are NOT sharpening it when you do this. You are only honing the edge--polishing it a bit, if you will. You don't bear down, but just gently swipe the edge across the steel. (A real "knife guy" will use a leather strop for this purpose, on his finest edges.)

This is the kind of steel you are looking for; as you can see, very inexpensive:
Amazon.com: J.A. Henckels International Fine Edge Pro 9-Inch Honing Steel: Knife Sharpeners: Home & Kitchen

Here is a good description what it is you are doing when you hone an edge:
What’s a Honing Steel? «

Honing your knives is very quick and easy. Do this regularly and your knives will stay nice and sharp, for a very long time, with very little effort, and without the need for constant sharpening.
__________________
denverd0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2015, 07:40   #40
Moderator
 
a64pilot's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Albany Ga.
Boat: Island Packet 38
Posts: 17,037
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

How do you sharpen Ceramic?
We have them in the Galley, seemed to be a good idea as they don't rust, but I have no idea how to sharpen them.
I'm guessing Diamond?
__________________
a64pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2015, 10:38   #41
Marine Service Provider

Join Date: May 2012
Location: New Orleans
Boat: We have a problem... A serious addiction issue.
Posts: 3,940
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

Quote:
Originally Posted by a64pilot View Post
How do you sharpen Ceramic?
We have them in the Galley, seemed to be a good idea as they don't rust, but I have no idea how to sharpen them.
I'm guessing Diamond?
Sharpening | Ceramic Knife.org
__________________
Greg

- If animals weren't meant to be eaten then they wouldn't be made of food.
Stumble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2015, 11:29   #42
Registered User
 
Cadence's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: SC
Boat: None,build the one shown of glass, had many from 6' to 48'.
Posts: 6,057
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dockhead View Post
I'm not a knife guy. I am not a connoisseur of knife craftsmanship, and I don't spend my spare time honing my favorite knives. So bear with me here.

I have a Myerchin rigging knife, much treasured simply because it was my father's. He carried it for decades of sailing and gave it to me one day -- long before he stopped sailing -- for some reason.

I sharpen it, although, not being a knife guy, probably not to ideal standards.

Attachment 97978

The problem is that I have also an el-cheapo, undoubtedly Chinese, "Jaguar" brand folding rigging knife, which is serrated. I've never sharpened it. And yet it cuts everything, all the time, without the slightest fuss. Seemly better than the real rigging knife does, straight after I've sharpened it.

I notice that the present generation of Myerchin rigging knives is also serrated. Is this the wave of the future? Or am I simply not doing a good job of honing the "real" rigging knife?

I will be grateful for advice from people who unlike me actually understand something about knives. Despite not being a knife guy, I become like a Sikh, on board -- always with a blade about my person.
Keep your Dad's for the memories. If you use it, it will probably get lost.
__________________
Cadence is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2015, 11:57   #43
Registered User
 
Suijin's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Annapolis MD; currently in Oriental NC
Boat: Valiant 40
Posts: 2,886
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

Quote:
Originally Posted by a64pilot View Post
How do you sharpen Ceramic?
We have them in the Galley, seemed to be a good idea as they don't rust, but I have no idea how to sharpen them.
I'm guessing Diamond?
I use one of these for all my sharpening:



Lansky Ceramic Sharp Stick $10 on Amazon.

I used to carry a honing stone onboard but the stick is smaller, easier, faster, and honestly works 99% as well. Works fine on ceramic, cobalt, stainless etc. and particularly for scalloped serrations.
__________________
Suijin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2015, 13:32   #44
Registered User
 
Cadence's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: SC
Boat: None,build the one shown of glass, had many from 6' to 48'.
Posts: 6,057
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

Quote:
Originally Posted by carstenb View Post
This is what I have and carry. Like Greg I have yet to find anything it won't cut through like a hot knife going through butter (pardon the expression)

But I also have sheath knives paced at various points around the boat where they might come in handy, by the mast, in the cockpit etc.
Carsten, doesn't look like my marlin spike sheep footed knife. With braided line the marlin spike is like the sexton. Might be impressive if not functual and I need that.
__________________
Cadence is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-02-2015, 13:45   #45
Registered User
 
ryon's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Southern California
Posts: 588
Re: Rigging Knives -- Straight vs Serrated?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cadence View Post
Carsten, doesn't look like my marlin spike sheep footed knife. With braided line the marlin spike is like the sexton. Might be impressive if not functual and I need that.
It depends on the type of sailing that you do. I tend to use my marlinspike more than I use my knife.
__________________

__________________
ryon is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
rigging

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Race to Alaska and steak knives Nikolina General Sailing Forum 2 24-01-2015 19:07
Sailing and Fishing Knives Ben M-P Commercial Posts 12 08-08-2011 15:22
pilotage through the Torres straight micoverde General Sailing Forum 7 08-06-2006 15:41



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:54.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.