Cruisers Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 04-01-2018, 09:38   #1
Registered User
 
zengirl's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Florida
Boat: Freedom 32'
Posts: 499
Propane Question

Ok, I have a new hose and filled tank yesterday with propane. When the guy started to fill the tank I saw him release the valve with a screwdriver, however, I wasn't there when he finished filling the tank so I don't know if he closed the valve. My problem is my stove burner lights for 4 seconds and the flame goes out. I've never had a problem before and I'm only guessing it's air in the line. I've had air in the line before and it took very little time to dissipate. I've been trying since last night to light the burners. No luck. If I attempt to close the valve would air on top get released or would I lose propane? Any suggestions? Thanks for all your help.
__________________
Life shrinks and expands in proportion to one's courage.
Anais Nin
zengirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2018, 09:48   #2
Registered User
 
Vasco's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Toronto
Boat: CS36Merlin, "La Belle Aurore"
Posts: 7,529
Re: Propane Question

If he didn't close the valve your tank would be empty. Why did you need a new hose? Your problem might be the solenoid.
__________________
Rick I
Toronto in summer, Bahamas in winter.
Vasco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2018, 09:53   #3
Registered User
 
Privilege's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Bermuda
Boat: Privilege 435
Posts: 576
Images: 12
Re: Propane Question

Propane is heavier than air so it sits in the bottom of your tank. In order to get in down the lines it is pressurized inside the tank. The guy filling your tank will not be responsible for pressurizing your system as he doesn't know what was left turned on so the likelihood is that he has left the tank valve closed which is why you're not getting any propane.
Privilege is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2018, 10:25   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Oz
Posts: 1,022
Re: Propane Question

Does your tank have a pressure gauge fitted ?(if not it would be wise to get one for leakage testing - not very expensive) When the tank is full and for most of the time it has propane it it the gauge will have a reading of over 100 - 150 psig with the valve open. If the gauge is registering propane at this level then you should get propane at the stove outlet, provided the stove itself has it's own valve open (not just the hob, but there may be one in the propane line before, or as, it enters the stove base.) If there is pressure registering at the tank and still no propane at the burner, you may have an inoperative solenoid, a blocked line or burner jet or worse still a big leak in the line before it gets to the burner - suggest you get a propane guy to fix it.

See link

Propane Systems by Don Casey - BoatUS
Bean Counter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2018, 10:30   #5
Moderator
 
weavis's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: UK-Mallorca
Posts: 13,278
Send a message via Skype™ to weavis
Re: Propane Question

OR... try it on another appliance... a BBQ or something that takes propane..
__________________
- Never test how deep the water is with both feet -
10% of conflicts are due to different opinions. 90% by the tone of voice.
Raise your words, not your voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder.
weavis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2018, 10:40   #6
Registered User
 
Vasco's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Toronto
Boat: CS36Merlin, "La Belle Aurore"
Posts: 7,529
Re: Propane Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Privilege View Post
Propane is heavier than air so it sits in the bottom of your tank. In order to get in down the lines it is pressurized inside the tank. The guy filling your tank will not be responsible for pressurizing your system as he doesn't know what was left turned on so the likelihood is that he has left the tank valve closed which is why you're not getting any propane.
?????

I assume the valve that was opened with a screwdriver is at the top of the tank. This is the vent.Many operators fill the tanks this way. Once the propane comes out of the vent hole the tank is at its maximum capacity. They then screw in the vent screw and then shut the tank with the valve on top and remove the filler hose. In the US all tanks must have OPD's and using the vent method of filling ensures the tank is 80% filled. The maximum with an OPD.

Either the OP did not open the shut off valve when connecting to the hose, highly unlikely but possible or there is another problem, solenoid, or something else.
__________________
Rick I
Toronto in summer, Bahamas in winter.
Vasco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2018, 10:41   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: SoCal
Boat: Formosa 30 ketch
Posts: 737
Re: Propane Question

The excess flow safety valve probably shut off. Turn off the tank valve, maybe even raise the tank an inch or so and drop it, and then SLOWLY turn on the tank valve. If you hear a click, do it again. May have to activate the solenoid valve first.
Bill Seal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2018, 11:46   #8
Moderator Emeritus
 
sailorchic34's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: SF Bay Area
Boat: Islander 34
Posts: 5,486
Re: Propane Question

Just going with the simply things first. Is the manual valve on top of the propane tank open? That caught me once.

The vent screw if left open would vent propane and you would I think notice the odor when reinstalling the tank or when transporting in the car.

I would check the gas soleniod / wiring to make sure nothing is corroded or not working.
sailorchic34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2018, 02:54   #9
Registered User

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2011
Location: Miami Florida
Boat: Ellis Flybridge 28
Posts: 3,760
Re: Propane Question

There are two valves on top of your tank, the big knob opens the fill/supply valve and a screw driver opens the vent valve. You would know it if he havenít closed the vent. You do not want to open the vent now that the tank is full.

Propane is a liquid as it goes into the tank. Just like filling a water tank, the propane tank needs to be vented to let vapor out as the liquid goes in.
__________________
Retired from Hopkins-Carter Marine Supplies
HopCar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2018, 08:39   #10
Registered User
 
zengirl's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Florida
Boat: Freedom 32'
Posts: 499
Re: Propane Question

Thanks to all for responses. It ended up being a faulty new hose. However, I did purchase a new solenoid, regulator and extra hose for backup. So I'm glad it all happened.
__________________
Life shrinks and expands in proportion to one's courage.
Anais Nin
zengirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
propane

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Propane vs. Butane in a Lehr propane outboard Roy M Plumbing Systems and Fixtures 30 13-10-2014 09:34
Lehr Propane outboard: horizontal tank? liquid propane? ngermain Engines and Propulsion Systems 79 18-08-2014 16:06
Propane oven and BBQ on one tank / regulator question Northeaster Plumbing Systems and Fixtures 12 10-07-2008 17:06
Another propane question JusDreaming Plumbing Systems and Fixtures 5 15-10-2007 15:24

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:30.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.