Cruisers Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 30-10-2017, 17:05   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 3
Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

Hi all,

This is my first post on here, so I apologize in advance if I come off as a complete rook (or something less savory). I currently live in southern California but am looking at taking a job in the Baltimore area (Linthicum Heights) so I was wondering how liveaboard life would vary in that location. For example, during winter, does the Chesapeake Bay freeze and require boats to be removed from the water? What kind of slip rental price should I be expecting for a 45' boat? Any recommendations for a liveabord marina in general that are close to the area, or major changes that I may not be aware if I did move to that region? I saw a couple threads on here that touched base on liveabord life in the MD area, but would really like guidance on these questions. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers!
Swabbie_ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-10-2017, 17:27   #2
Registered User
 
TheOffice's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Annapolis
Boat: Hylas 44
Posts: 897
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

Several old threads on the subject. The creeks May freeze but de icers around the boats keep them safe. Slip fees vary with Annapolis being 8k or so a year. Baltimore much less.
TheOffice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-10-2017, 19:19   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Baltimore, MD / Albany, NY
Boat: Alberg 35
Posts: 267
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

From Linthicum Heights, you need to think about at least three areas.
1. Annapolis.. one of the sailing capitals with high prices, lots of boats, lots of racing.
2. Magothy River - this is actually pretty close to Linthicum. Quiet, nice. Not much there.
3. Baltimore. Cheaper, all the things that come from a big city. It's 20 minutes from Linthicum (I drive the airport to marina all the time).

I have an Alberg 35 at Achorage Marina. They do have liveaboards; 600 slips approximately. You could either buy or rent a slip. You'd be close to endless restaurants and cafes and a grocery store. We love the location.

The Bay in the Baltimore area doesn't generally freeze. We don't take our boat out during the winter. There is some snow and ice at times. If you decide to live on your boat, make sure you'll have a source of water; that's an issue at several marinas.
__________________
Jim Eaton
s/v Pendragon Alberg 35 #175
Pendragon35 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-10-2017, 04:41   #4
Senior Cruiser
 
GordMay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 40,426
Images: 241
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, Swabbie.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 31-10-2017, 05:18   #5
Registered User
 
rwidman's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: North Charleston, SC
Boat: Camano Troll
Posts: 4,669
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

It gets cold in Baltimore in the winter. It snows. I grew up and lived in MD not far from Baltimore until I retired and moved south.

Most boats are hauled, blocked and winterized in that area. Some are left in the water with bubblers to keep the ice away. The Bay has frozen over a few times in history but it doesn't usually freeze.

I suggest doing some research on the Internet about the area and calling marinas to ask about liveaboard questions.
__________________
Ron
HIGH COTTON
Sent from my laptop using Windows 7
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-10-2017, 05:33   #6
Registered User
 
ranger42c's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Maryland, USA
Boat: 42' Sportfish
Posts: 4,521
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

Yep, Annapolis or Baltimore Harbor area most likely.

Yes, the creeks (and marina fairways) can freeze. Even if the creeks don't freeze, snow and ice can cover docks. Many winterize and haul for the winter, but many boats stay in the water... usually with boats winterized and a de-icer available.

But there are year-round liveaboards, too. Basic issues to solve up front: winter water, winter pump-outs, and of course heat. ActiveCaptain will have info on which marinas address those more easily than others.

Water temps get cold enough so that latter can mean reverse cycle heat won't work all that well... so some auxiliary heat source would be best.

-Chris
__________________
Selby Bay, South River, Chesapeake Bay, USA.
ranger42c is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-10-2017, 05:51   #7
Registered User
 
rwidman's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: North Charleston, SC
Boat: Camano Troll
Posts: 4,669
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

Quote:
Originally Posted by ranger42c View Post
................

Water temps get cold enough so that latter can mean reverse cycle heat won't work all that well... so some auxiliary heat source would be best.

-Chris
And many of those auxiliary heat sources can be pretty dangerous. Think very carefully about the selection, installation and operation of those devices.

I was able to source an air conditioner that uses electrical resistance heating rather than reverse cycle. It's not as energy efficient but it works regardless of the water temperature.
__________________
Ron
HIGH COTTON
Sent from my laptop using Windows 7
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-10-2017, 06:09   #8
Registered User
 
ranger42c's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Maryland, USA
Boat: 42' Sportfish
Posts: 4,521
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
And many of those auxiliary heat sources can be pretty dangerous. Think very carefully about the selection, installation and operation of those devices.

I was able to source an air conditioner that uses electrical resistance heating rather than reverse cycle. It's not as energy efficient but it works regardless of the water temperature.
Some previous dock neighbors did that, too. When they replaced their really old reverse cycle with a new one, they had the optional resistance unit fitted, too... so they had both. When water temps got too cold, they just closed the seacock and carried on with the resistance unit.

-Chris
__________________
Selby Bay, South River, Chesapeake Bay, USA.
ranger42c is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-10-2017, 08:31   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: North East USA
Boat: 1975 Tartan 41'
Posts: 703
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

I have my boat at Anchorage marina in Baltimore, a short walk from Fells Point and Safeway supermarket is right across the street. There's West marine and Ace hardware within a short walk too. Many live a boards and it is a nice marina with showers, laundry a 'club' house, pool, live bands in the summer, etc. I'm only there for the 6mo season, but they give big discounts for the winter people who stay in the water. I think they quoted $4900 for my 45 ft slip for the whole year, compared to $3300 for my 6mo. Live-a-board pricing is likely 10-15% higher. still cheap compared to CT, RI slips I've been in. I'm not sure about freezing but I imagine in the cold spells that some ice forms, but not a solid sheet. I'm not sure if the boats that stay in use a bubbler or something, or if they are fine with nothing. Ask them 410-522-7200.
zstine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-10-2017, 10:05   #10
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: New York, New York
Boat: Dufour Safari 27'
Posts: 1,640
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

Quote:
Originally Posted by ranger42c View Post
Water temps get cold enough so that latter can mean reverse cycle heat won't work all that well... so some auxiliary heat source would be best.
There are a good variety of ways to heat your boat. Some of them include diesel, electric, solid fuel, and propane. Each has their advantages and disadvantages. As one poster mentioned, they can be dangerous if not done correctly. Don't be scared of any type, but do learn what not to do as well as what to do.

Electric is often claimed to be the safest. This not actually true. While the electric heater won't give off any dangerous fumes, the shore power cable can be very dangerous. In fact, the insurance statistics say that roughly fifty-five percent of all boat fires are due to electrical issues, with just over half of those due to shore power cable issues. The true figure is probably higher since many causes are never proven. If you decide to use shore power, it would be wise to upgrade to a Smart Plug (no, I don't sell these!). It is a much more secure system due to the way it locks in place and the exponentially greater surface area for electrical contact. One other disadvantage to electric heating is that you lose your heat if you go out during the winter. If you don't leave the dock then this is not an issue.

If you use shore power, check with the marina to see what rate they are charging. There is a marina in the NYC area that doubles the electrical rate. I know of some boaters who are paying $300 to $400 per month for electricity due to this. Having said this, electrical heating is the generally the quickest, easiest, and least risky (in terms of fumes) way to heat a boat. I have used it and had no issues. Just make sure that you are not overloading your system since they draw a lot of amps. Also make sure they won't tip over and that no combustibles are near the heater.

Propane works but it is a wet fuel. This fuel can have condensation issues if not vented properly. Like diesel and solid fuels, it must be vented properly. There are indoor propane heaters. They are not suitable for constant heating due to condensation, however they are great for instant heat while another heater heats up. I use the Mr. Heater for instant heat and turn it off after thirty or so minutes. I don't get condensation in that short period but I do get quick heat.

Diesel heaters also work well and have the benefit of a single source of fuel assuming your engine is also a diesel. An added benefit is that you can get a diesel oven/heater combination thus providing additional usefulness. One acquaintance heats his boat and cooks with a diesel heater/oven and uses no more than a gallon a day for his boat, which is around 40 feet long and he likes his boat quite warm, as in over 70 degrees. They are reasonably efficient and cost effective.

I have installed a solid fuel heater that is designed for coal, as well as some other solid fuels. It is the best heat possible. It is dry and very efficient. Like the other heaters that burn fuel, you must exercise reasonable care. First, you have to make sure it is properly vented, and it is a good idea to get a carbon monoxide alarm. Actually, it is a good idea no mater the heater since the engine can create deadly fumes too.

Some solid fuel heaters can burn fuel too quickly if you don't adjust the flue correctly. The Dickinson Heater is good but needs a slight modification to reduce the drafts and slow down the burn. If you don't slow the burn, you will need to refuel it every half hour or so. The Tiny Tot stove is cast iron and will burn for a good six hours or more with coal. It is compact (6 inches diameter X 11 inches tall) and well made (no, I don't sell this either) and only some $250. There are plenty of others but these are the ones I am familiar with.

Some solid fuel heaters have the advantage of being able to burn multiple fuels. I have a few friends who have sources of old, seasoned palettes and have essentially a free (not counting their time) source of fuel. The down side to solid fuel heaters is that if you don't adjust the fuel-air mixture correctly you can get soot. They, like the vented propane and diesel heaters are more complicated to install than electric heaters. You should also insulate areas that are within a few inches of the heater with some sort of fireproof material. I know people who have not put any barriers next to the heater but I prefer a little extra protection since it is easy to overheat the flue if you are not paying attention.

None of the above heaters that require installation are terribly difficult to install but they will require time to install. I am not familiar with reverse cycle heaters but they do offer many advantages so you should look into those also. If you are moving to Baltimore now you will likely need to stick with electric since the temperatures are cooling off now and it will be much harder to get epoxy to cure properly. You may wish to start with electric heat until you get situated. You don't mention if you already have a boat. If not, you may buy one that already has a heater installed.

If you have any further questions please feel free to call, write, or PM me. Good luck with you move.
ArmyDaveNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-10-2017, 11:20   #11
Registered User

Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 416
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

Be aware that many area marinas forbid the heating of unattended boats. The good news is that sub-freezing days come in spurts for a few days before it warms some. Winterizing a boat before heading off to work is surely a PITA. The liveaboards I know are retired so it isn't an issue for them.
Drew13440 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-10-2017, 14:06   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 3
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

Wow, thank you all so much for the speedy and informative replies. Definitely gives me a much better starting point of where to look for marinas and heat sources...already so glad I joined this forum!
Swabbie_ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-10-2017, 15:38   #13
Registered User
 
Terrapin's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Traveling the ICW
Boat: Island Trader 37 Ketch
Posts: 22
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

We lived aboard in Baltimore for a year. We heated with a combination of electric, kerosene and propane heaters, and stayed plenty warm. When we were off the boat, however, we only used one small heater designed to keep the temperature above freezing. With the small space (37 foot boat), things quickly warmed up when we returned to the boat and fired up the propane and/or kerosene heaters.

One thing to be aware of is that the water to the docks is generally turned off from December through April (or June last year.) That means you have to borrow 8 or 9 hoses and string them together in order to fill your tanks from a faucet onshore, or carry water to your boat in 5 gallon containers. We've done both. Will your boat have a water heater? I don't mind washing my hands in "room temperature" water when it's 70 - 100 degrees outside, but when the weather is below freezing, it's pretty uncomfortable. We heated water in the tea kettle for hair washing and sponge baths, but not for washing hands every time we used the head.

Living aboard with a car is one thing -- we still had our cars -- living aboard without one was quite another the winter we cruised on the Chesapeake. We did take our boat out in the winter time, but nice days for sailing were few and far between.
__________________
1977 Island Trader 37 Ketch
Terrapin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2017, 17:12   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 3
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrapin View Post
We lived aboard in Baltimore for a year. We heated with a combination of electric, kerosene and propane heaters, and stayed plenty warm. When we were off the boat, however, we only used one small heater designed to keep the temperature above freezing. With the small space (37 foot boat), things quickly warmed up when we returned to the boat and fired up the propane and/or kerosene heaters.

One thing to be aware of is that the water to the docks is generally turned off from December through April (or June last year.) That means you have to borrow 8 or 9 hoses and string them together in order to fill your tanks from a faucet onshore, or carry water to your boat in 5 gallon containers. We've done both. Will your boat have a water heater? I don't mind washing my hands in "room temperature" water when it's 70 - 100 degrees outside, but when the weather is below freezing, it's pretty uncomfortable. We heated water in the tea kettle for hair washing and sponge baths, but not for washing hands every time we used the head.

Living aboard with a car is one thing -- we still had our cars -- living aboard without one was quite another the winter we cruised on the Chesapeake. We did take our boat out in the winter time, but nice days for sailing were few and far between.

Hi Terrapin,

The boat I am in the works of acquiring (actually boat-less at the moment) will have a water heater, and I am planning on installing a watermaker if/when I get this boat. Would that setup preclude me from having to use the hose setup you are talking about, or do watermakers not fair too well in freezing temps?

Thanks!
Swabbie_ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2017, 17:44   #15
Registered User
 
TheOffice's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Annapolis
Boat: Hylas 44
Posts: 897
Re: Living aboard in the Baltimore Area

You can’t use a water maker in Baltimore or most of the upper Bay. You will go through filters like crazy
TheOffice is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
baltimore, living aboard

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Live aboard Baltimore area KingLear52 Liveaboard's Forum 0 06-10-2014 13:48
Want to Rent: Live aboard, year round, Baltimore-Annapolis area wrightideas Classifieds Archive 0 05-08-2013 08:31
Thinking about living aboard NYC area Corcy423 Liveaboard's Forum 16 18-07-2012 13:53
Make a Living, Living Aboard JanetGroene Boat Ownership & Making a Living 0 19-11-2010 12:28
Living Aboard in Ft. Myers Area (Sailboat) katiekates Liveaboard's Forum 25 23-04-2008 21:00

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 13:48.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.