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Old 30-11-2016, 07:13   #16
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Re: To drill or not to drill...

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FYI "topsides" are the sides of the hull between the waterline and the sheer (toe rail).
I didn't know that. Thanks. I always thought that that area was referred to as freeboard.
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Old 30-11-2016, 07:17   #17
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Re: To drill or not to drill...

So these hand holes that are held on with screws, how much weight do you think you will apply to them in an emergency to stop you going overboard?

Suggest you through bolt them.

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Old 30-11-2016, 07:48   #18
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Re: To drill or not to drill...

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So these hand holes that are held on with screws, how much weight do you think you will apply to them in an emergency to stop you going overboard?

Suggest you through bolt them.

Pete
Because of the above, & that so much crap gets lashed to them sometimes, I've always wondered why metal ones are so uncommon? So swapping the teak for somthing better would be running through my mind about now.
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Old 30-11-2016, 07:55   #19
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Re: To drill or not to drill...

There is a steel charter boat in Cornwall which had welded steel handles on the outside of the stern to help divers get back on board. With 4 cylinders for trimix diving and a big sea running I pulled the handle straight off the hull and fell back in the sea. Not really a problem as I had the regulator in my mouth and was dressed for the occasion with a full drysuit, be different in sailing kit.

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Old 30-11-2016, 08:03   #20
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Re: To drill or not to drill...

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So these hand holes that are held on with screws, how much weight do you think you will apply to them in an emergency to stop you going overboard?

Suggest you through bolt them.

Pete
I plan on bolting them. Only the interior hand rails are screwed in.
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Old 30-11-2016, 08:50   #21
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Re: To drill or not to drill...

You can get a little carried away with these kinds of repairs. Think of the age and value of the boat, the extent of the damage, what's really needed for a sound handrail, etc., and adopt the most feasible, cost-effective solution that will give you time to enjoy the boat.

IMHO, a one-square-foot soft spot in the deck of an old boat is often not really worth major surgery. Just stop the water from getting into it, and tap around it every year or so to see if it is spreading..

I had an older 30 footer in years past that had a LOT of deck rot. A very experienced boatyard manager walked the deck with me once and graciously pointed out what he thought was worth fixing and what could be left alone. Basically, unless somebody's going to fall through, there are better ways to spend your time and money.
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Old 30-11-2016, 08:55   #22
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Re: To drill or not to drill...

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...unless somebody's going to fall through, there are better ways to spend your time and money.
That's one way to view a badly neglected boat.
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Old 30-11-2016, 09:36   #23
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Re: To drill or not to drill...

One way to find the extent of the wet is to drill small holes starting close and then radiating away from the wet holes. Like 1/8-3/16 holes.
-Drill one,
-remove the wood from the spiral in the bit, squeeze the wood between your thumb and forefinger.
-If wet, water comes out when you squeeze it.
-The advisability of this depends on how your overhead is constructed though, can you cover these up later? If really wet water will drip slowly out of these holes.
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Old 30-11-2016, 09:40   #24
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Re: To drill or not to drill...

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Originally Posted by Tia Bu View Post
You can get a little carried away with these kinds of repairs. Think of the age and value of the boat, the extent of the damage, what's really needed for a sound handrail, etc., and adopt the most feasible, cost-effective solution that will give you time to enjoy the boat.

IMHO, a one-square-foot soft spot in the deck of an old boat is often not really worth major surgery. Just stop the water from getting into it, and tap around it every year or so to see if it is spreading..

I had an older 30 footer in years past that had a LOT of deck rot. A very experienced boatyard manager walked the deck with me once and graciously pointed out what he thought was worth fixing and what could be left alone. Basically, unless somebody's going to fall through, there are better ways to spend your time and money.
Some truth to this for sure. Classic case of "should do" vs "must do" . It may depend on your plans for the boat. Local use? vs sail the world.
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Old 30-11-2016, 10:08   #25
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Re: To drill or not to drill...

I'm firmly in the camp of "The perfect is the enemy of the the good".

Virtually all boats of this age and manufacture have some soft spots. Probably have for a decade. Unless you are heading off on a circumnavigation through the high latitudes, you don't risk much with a less than perfect repair and then annual monitoring.

Go to the CPES site. They have lots of suggestions about how to dry wood. For example, pouring in some alcohol can help. A home vacuum cleaner left on for a day is even better. Let it dry as long as possible. Then use the CPES to strengthen the wood you can't easily reach. It flows a long way. It will provide a great attachment for the solid epoxy you'll put in the hole.

CPES™-Wood based epoxy products to repair and resist wood rot.

Also check the West epoxy site for how to mount hardware using epoxy. Extremely strong if done properly.

WEST SYSTEM | Use Guides - Bonding Hardware

Finally, consider using MaineSail's butyl tape under the handrails. They always flex and break regular caulk seals over time. The butyl will flex with them.
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Old 30-11-2016, 11:52   #26
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Re: To drill or not to drill...

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I'm firmly in the camp of "The perfect is the enemy of the the good".

Virtually all boats of this age and manufacture have some soft spots. Probably have for a decade. Unless you are heading off on a circumnavigation through the high latitudes, you don't risk much with a less than perfect repair and then annual monitoring.

Go to the CPES site. They have lots of suggestions about how to dry wood. For example, pouring in some alcohol can help. A home vacuum cleaner left on for a day is even better. Let it dry as long as possible. Then use the CPES to strengthen the wood you can't easily reach. It flows a long way. It will provide a great attachment for the solid epoxy you'll put in the hole.

CPES™-Wood based epoxy products to repair and resist wood rot.

Also check the West epoxy site for how to mount hardware using epoxy. Extremely strong if done properly.

WEST SYSTEM | Use Guides - Bonding Hardware

Finally, consider using MaineSail's butyl tape under the handrails. They always flex and break regular caulk seals over time. The butyl will flex with them.

Pretty much my thoughts too. The area where the wood is rotten is pretty small and I think I've got most of it out. I really don't think that I need to do an extensive repair job as I only sail my boat in local waters a few times a season. I'm actually considering selling it but I keep changing my mind.

The boat is 43 years old and is still going strong so as long as I can securely mount the new rails and keep the water out, I'm happy.

I've already purchased the butyl tape.

Here is a photo of some of the holes I'm referring to. This was taken before sanding but after drilling and counter sinking the holes.



You can see the old rail before I removed it on the cabin topside



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