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Old 10-02-2024, 22:43   #1
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interior paint?

I am in the middle of repainting the the head / shower, bulkleads and settee, so the inside of a 42' mono. I have sanded and primed with total boat primer and was planning on using Rustoleum topside paint, untill the store wouldn't tint it. So if I want to use that product it is as sold only, which of course is not the color I am looking for. I want a off white but not yellowy white, and would like something that can be tinted easily at the paint store.

Will any oil based extior paint work for the cabin interior, am I just overthinking it? What brands have you used and liked or not liked?

Thanks
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Old 11-02-2024, 01:20   #2
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Re: interior paint?

I'd use a paint that has anti mold/fungi ingredients.
Dulux Easycare Bathroom Soft Sheen


freshlickhttps://www.freshlick.com › products › dulux-easyca...














A steam and moisture resistant emulsion guaranteeing a 5 year protection against mould on bathroom walls and ceilings, using Mouldtec formulation.
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Old 11-02-2024, 03:15   #3
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Re: interior paint?

George Kirby paint company in New Bedford makes lovely oil-based boat paint, and will tint to any color he doesn't have in stock. You can request a catalog of stock paint colors from his website.
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Old 12-02-2024, 12:43   #4
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Re: interior paint?

Thanks, Dulux doesn't look available in the US.
FWIW I bought some Behr exterior paint from Home Depot for the cabnient in the head, and it states a 5 yr stain and milldew resistance.

George Kirby looks interesting..
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Old 12-02-2024, 13:12   #5
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Re: interior paint?

Why wouldn’t you tint it yourself? It’s easy, just use a disposable pipette so you get it the same for every can. I make a light gray Rustoleum from white with a bit of black.

For areas that get wet like a shower, as well as high wear areas, I would use a more durable, 2-part paint.

I use Rustoleum on my ceiling panels, behind the slats lining the hull etc. but I use a 2-part polyurethane for the galley, the head etc. I have used Awlgrip and Epifanes… both work just fine but I was surprised that black Epifanes didn’t need tipping after rolling so it probably works easier.

For bulkheads I just finished experimenting and will use TotalProtect (an epoxy barrier coat) as the primer. It sands really smooth and uneven areas are easily fixed with TotalFair. Of course I haven’t decided on the topcoat yet but Rustoleum is a candidate if it’s gonna be paint.
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Old 13-02-2024, 00:52   #6
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Re: interior paint?

Quote:
Originally Posted by pdx_sailing View Post
Thanks, Dulux doesn't look available in the US...
According to Wikipedia:
The brand name Dulux has been used by both Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI) and DuPont since 1931 and was one of the first alkyd-based paints.
It is produced by AkzoNobel (originally produced by ICI prior to 2008) although the North American market is now served by PPG Industries.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dulux
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Old 13-02-2024, 05:06   #7
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Re: interior paint?

Quote:
Originally Posted by pdx_sailing View Post
I am in the middle of repainting the the head / shower, bulkleads and settee, so the inside of a 42' mono. I have sanded and primed with total boat primer and was planning on using Rustoleum topside paint, untill the store wouldn't tint it. So if I want to use that product it is as sold only, which of course is not the color I am looking for. I want a off white but not yellowy white, and would like something that can be tinted easily at the paint store.

Will any oil based extior paint work for the cabin interior, am I just overthinking it? What brands have you used and liked or not liked?

We're in the middle of a similar "head" project, replacing some failing wallpaper with paint.

We're using Sherwin-Williams Extreme Bond Primer, and topcoating with Emerald Interior Acrylic topcoat tinted to our color preference. Our test panel looks decent.

You can read about those, but our selection was partly about paint qualities (Emerald resists mold and mildew, etc.), partly about tinting (some of their paints can't be tinted to our preference), and partly about quantities (we only need about a pint whereas some paints only come in minimum 1 gallon containers).

I thought at first we'd use oil-based paints, but eventually decided that's just too much work.

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Old 13-02-2024, 05:50   #8
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Re: interior paint?

HomeDepot carries Tremclad or Rustoleum. Both are excellent "EXTERIOR grade" paints and therefore eminently suitable for "high wear" interior applications such as bathrooms and other spaces that have to withstand water.

The Tremclad you want has a deathshead on the label. I keep telling the EPA that I never drink the stuff, but at least it makes it really easy to select the right type of paint - oil based :-)

As Jedi sez, you can start with pure white, and using a pipette you can add drops of some other colour, one drop at a time, to get the precise tint you want. You can make any colour you want by nixing the three primary colours: Red, Yellow and Blue. Keep a careful note of the number of drops of each colour you add to a given quantity of white. That's what the "mixing schedule" on the can does when you have the store mix the paint for you. Be warned: A few drops have a DRASTIC effect!

Go to a beginning artist's text on oil painting to learn the science/craft/art of mixing colours.

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Old 13-02-2024, 06:02   #9
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Re: interior paint?

I don’t find Rustoleum suitable for the shower. It’s too soft, to easily scratched imo.

Also for the galley, where grease from cooking is prevalent, requiring cleaning often.

For these areas two part paints are a better fit. They often are fiberglass and gelcoat to start with.
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Old 13-02-2024, 07:24   #10
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Re: interior paint?

I'd go for the one part polyurethane here, an excellent paint for interior use. Comes in many different colors and you can seal the can and re-use the paint later if you so choose for touch up work, etc.
Two part polyurethane is a better, hardier paint, but once you open the can and add the hardener, that's it for that can.
I have used the one part polyerathane on countless interior....and exterior projects....and have found it to be remarkably tough and long lasting.
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Old 13-02-2024, 08:39   #11
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Re: interior paint?

Thanks for input on paint type and locations, I need the 1 part simplicity since I will be painting small sections at a time. The rustoleum product can only be colored by other restoleum colors as its not a tint base per the customer support at rustoleum. So yes I could mess around with learning to tint it to a color I want or I can chose a different product that I can get tinted and spend my limited time on the actual painting.
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Old 13-02-2024, 09:03   #12
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Re: interior paint?

I found the one part polyurethane paint excellent for most anything.
I use the small foam "throw away" brushes, and the finish comes out very smooth and professional looking. For somebody, who does not like painting much, like me, it's ideal.
You can also thin it down if needed.
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Old 13-02-2024, 09:16   #13
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Re: interior paint?

That is understood.

However, professional painters just keep the chemistry of the paints in the "mix" the same. So, to a 1 gallon can of gloss white, using a pipette, add a drop or a few from a 1/2 pint can of whatever colour OF THE SAME PAINT you need to produce your tint.

"Tint" is a colour "lightened" by adding white. "Shade" is colour darkened by adding black.

A gallon of Tremclad will give you about 400 square feet of coverage when applied as one coat of 6 "mill" thickness. "6 Mill" is the thickness that you have just before the paint makes "curtains" on a vertical surface.

A gallon costs about ninety bux Canadian. A 1/2 pint about fifteen bux.

When applied to 6 mill thickness by a low nap or sponge roller, Tremclad is nicely "self-levelling". Using a brush, you would "tip" it ever so lightly and take good care on vertical surfaces that you don't get "curtains". If using a brush, use a nylon bristle brush and clean it with varsol after use. After cleaning it with varsol, wash it with dishwashing detergent and lukewarm water. If you notice paint working up close to the ferrule on the brush, stop your work, clean and dry the brush scrupulously, and then carry on with the now clean brush fully charged.

For a job like yours, I'd definitely choose a brush in preference to a roller.

"Tack time" for Tremclad at room temperature is about 8 hours, recoat time, 24 hours minimum, but 48 is better.

Bonne chance :-)!
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Old 13-02-2024, 09:24   #14
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Re: interior paint?

Mixing a full can of 2-part paint for a small section is madness. Of course you mix only the quantity that you need… who ever did that differently?!

Tinting an off-white paint is the easiest of jobs. Use a color palette from a manufacturer and see what color you want to add to white, i.e. brown or yellow etc. A couple drops, mix with the paddle in the cordless drill and paint.

You tint the whole can and remember how many drops or how many ml you used (the pipette has a scale).

Last but not least: Rustoleum sells tint base. You really should not call them because you spoke to some nitwit. See attached picture.
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Old 13-02-2024, 15:42   #15
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Re: interior paint?

The old saying that "A good workman doesn't blame his tools" is not really all that true when it comes to painting/varnishing.
Good brushes are a highly worthwhile investment and can last many years while giving superior results.
Get some "Badger" style brushes, they hold a decent "load" of product and release it onto the surface in a consistent and predictable manner.
The cheap Nylon brushes are too soft and flimsy for use with heavier bodied paint/enamel, and don't give the "laying down" that a good Natural/China/Badger brush will.
https://www.redtreeind.com/brushes/f...brushes/badger
You want good a good enamel for interior, (or exterior)?
Then get some "Z Spar" #100 marine enamel from Pettit,
Tint it to your hearts desire.
As an aside; For those wanting to turn "white" into "bright", adding about 1/2 teaspoon or so of "Endevour Blue" to a quart of gloss white will do it, it's kind of like when your grandma but "Bluing" in the washing with the white shirts.
Of course, the true Luddites will mix white lead with turpentine, add some Titainum dioxide and a splash of Japan drier and make some "real" enamel.
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