Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 02-11-2019, 16:35   #16
Registered User
 
Nightsky's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 52
Re: Physics of heaving to

Quote:
Originally Posted by JPA Cate View Post
I'll confess, from the first picture, I thought we were dealing with a motor yacht, not a motor-sailer. She looks like she doesn't heel much. One of the deals about heaving to is that the boat will heel to the wind, and since the force goes up with the square of the velocity, even if she sits on an even keel when hove to at 20 knots, she is likely to heel at 50. If she is able to keep her head up to the weather, and you might need the storm jib to help with that-- the ride should be okay. But tiring, noisy (which adds to the fatigue). I wouldn't volunteer to go out and test it.

Ann
Ann I believe your first assumption is motor yacht is correct. I will go on the same assumption regarding Delfin and answer thus. In my previous working life as an albacore tuna fisherman on the westcoast of NA, in a 93' steel boat, aft wheelhouse very similar in style to the Delfin, we "hove to" almost every night except those instances when we ran all night to new fishing grounds. Very common to put the boat in neutral, shut the engine down and drift, regardless of the weather. Up to a point! Up to about 40 knots or so, it could be done in relative safety, if uncomfortable. Beyond 40 knots wave crests break and become dangerous, so we would just jog in to the waves. One thing you learn is that all boats have different drift characteristics. Generally, they tend to lay abeam to the seas (not a great attribute) and the speed at which they drift varies widely between different hull shapes. If I wanted to drift more slowly, i would turn my rudder hard over as if to keep the bow up wind. If I had sea room (no boats down wind of me), I would center the rudder for a nicer ride but would be many miles away by morning from where I last fished. These were the drift characteristics of my boat, YMMV. On top of that, some boats tend to drift bow first, that is, make some way, while others tend to drift stern first. After a while we would know whose boat did what, and we could set up drift room after shutdown, so that our boats would drift apart rather than come together. Very useful to know the characteristics of your boat and those around you.
__________________

Nightsky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2019, 17:41   #17
Registered User
 
Delfin's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Anacortes, WA
Boat: 55' Romsdal
Posts: 2,072
Re: Physics of heaving to

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightsky View Post
Ann I believe your first assumption is motor yacht is correct. I will go on the same assumption regarding Delfin and answer thus. In my previous working life as an albacore tuna fisherman on the westcoast of NA, in a 93' steel boat, aft wheelhouse very similar in style to the Delfin, we "hove to" almost every night except those instances when we ran all night to new fishing grounds. Very common to put the boat in neutral, shut the engine down and drift, regardless of the weather. Up to a point! Up to about 40 knots or so, it could be done in relative safety, if uncomfortable. Beyond 40 knots wave crests break and become dangerous, so we would just jog in to the waves. One thing you learn is that all boats have different drift characteristics. Generally, they tend to lay abeam to the seas (not a great attribute) and the speed at which they drift varies widely between different hull shapes. If I wanted to drift more slowly, i would turn my rudder hard over as if to keep the bow up wind. If I had sea room (no boats down wind of me), I would center the rudder for a nicer ride but would be many miles away by morning from where I last fished. These were the drift characteristics of my boat, YMMV. On top of that, some boats tend to drift bow first, that is, make some way, while others tend to drift stern first. After a while we would know whose boat did what, and we could set up drift room after shutdown, so that our boats would drift apart rather than come together. Very useful to know the characteristics of your boat and those around you.
Yes she is a motor yacht, I suppose. I restored her masts because was that how she was originally built in 1965. Great info, Nightsky - exactly what I was looking for.
__________________

Delfin is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Challenge: Explain the Physics of Wind Over Tide Rex Delay Challenges 40 26-10-2015 08:09
Physics Question jkindredpdx Construction, Maintenance & Refit 108 26-04-2015 15:31
The Physics of Sailing Video Kenomac Seamanship & Boat Handling 0 10-02-2014 07:54
Physics, specs, and wind... Jack Long General Sailing Forum 23 22-07-2008 13:40

Advertise Here


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 16:33.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.