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Old 23-10-2009, 05:15   #61
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that explains...........married 15 years and finally see that put in one sillable
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Old 23-10-2009, 05:27   #62
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Mark don't posted these bathing tub pictures! Are you insane! It's like so photo in a fashion magnazine.

Ok I made a general comment how heavy boats. Should have know better.
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Old 23-10-2009, 05:46   #63
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Mark don't posted these bathing tub pictures!

.
Sorry

You could always use the bathtub for storing spare engine oil. The if it leaks you can just pull the plug

Or get her the boat with the tub but don't buy a watermaker!
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Old 23-10-2009, 10:35   #64
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In my previous post I was serious about most of the things I said but also threw in a few things that I knew would trigger some not so favourable feedbacks from men.

One thing was not clear though, my bad. When I said I like an access door that locks from the inside and outside I meant the door where you get in the boat, not the bedroom door. Since we have a pilot house, we have an actual door with lock and key. My point is that women like to be safe, and while on most boats you can lock the door from the outside with a padlock when you go to shore, you cannot lock it from the inside while you sleep.

The heavy boat is a must. Most women HATE heeling. You see, unless the woman in question was a sailor and a racer from a very young age, it's highly likely she will freak when the boat heels over. I admit I am one of them; the first time I put foot on a sailboat was at age 44. The likelyhood that I will develop a taste for heeling over more than 15 degrees is slim to none.

I agree with the fact that the cost of all the electronics is high. But I did not demand all those electronics, instead I worked and saved every penny so we can buy them. When we wanted to learn how to sail and all the other things one should know before going cruising we went as crew on a delivery run of a Hunter to Miami. We left New York at 14:00. Our first night on the ocean we were assigned watch shifts. We were shown how to find our position on a paper chart. The skipper drew a thick line in pencil from A to B (we were motoring) and told us to keep adjusting the autopilot so as we stay on that line. My husband's shift was starting at 02:00, but I couldn't sleep so I went in the cockpit with him. The girl that was just finishing her watch probably fell asleep, because the boat was way off course and as we were coming up into the cockpit the boat just passed an unlit, huge, steel red buoy so close that you could have touched if you extended your arm out. The boat had no radar, and there was no way you could see that big thing by staring into the darkness. A radar would have picked it up with no problem. There was no liferaft. The dinghy was stored and secured and there was no way we could have launched it in time. We realized that we could have died that night, and that was when my husband and I decided that we have to buy all the instruments and things that help make us safer before going away on our boat. As for the chartplotter/GPS, we never ran aground thanks to it, so I think it paid for itself, if not in $$ - because we had Boat US, then in saved humiliation.

While some men do regard us women as a huge liability and act all macho and try to convince mostly themselves that they do not need a woman, deep inside they wish they had one. A relationship with the right person is a good thing and it goes both ways. I learned a long time that if your partner is happy, then so are you. Maybe you just did not find the right girl yet.
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Old 23-10-2009, 11:03   #65
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Started sailing at 44! Hell you were just a kid! I satrted at 48 and my wife at 47. I agree that since we only started to sail was to be able to travel/cruise that we probably don't like at that heeling excitment (but I do like to go fast, just not to be on the edge). I don't seem to mind 20 degrees much as long as the boat is not taking gusts that bounce us to 30. But my wife looks nevous after 15 degrees and that is when she starts watching me closer to see if I look calm, or whether I'm just saying I am (I think it is still the gusts that freak her also).
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Old 23-10-2009, 12:31   #66
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In my previous post I was serious about most of the things I said but also threw in a few things that I knew would trigger some not so favourable feedbacks from men..............

.............While some men do regard us women as a huge liability and act all macho and try to convince mostly themselves that they do not need a woman, deep inside they wish they had one. A relationship with the right person is a good thing and it goes both ways. I learned a long time that if your partner is happy, then so are you. Maybe you just did not find the right girl yet.
I wouldn't take any differing opinions to heart, everyone has different plans & dreams and ways of getting their. To me your way sounds quite reasonable......after all, it's all about your choices making you (and yours)happy Cheers for sharing

What I have extracted from this thread is that women on a boat are very much like women ashore All different .........but with the same tendency (IME) to value a feeling of security, a degree of personal comfort and a desire for a home (rather than simply a place to kip, eat & sh#t as a means to an end ) a tad higher than many menfolk.

Accordingly to address the security thing I am now thinking of firmly securing the bucket Cheers
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Old 23-10-2009, 12:40   #67
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David, I think if you add a seat to that bucket you have a better chance of acceptance (by someone/something). By the way what is the Goat currently using?
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Old 23-10-2009, 13:30   #68
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David, I admit my last paragraph was kinda aimed at you and Brent. But you nailed it. Truth is, cruising is not for everyone, men or women. Men have lesser needs/wants than women, that's a given. There are way less women out there cruising than men, and only a handful of women would do with little or no comfort.

Most women would not even contemplate going cruising as that means they would have to abandon their nest. As for the ones that did or will, we could not have done it without our guys. Thank you.
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Old 23-10-2009, 14:06   #69
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Although I currently own my own sailboat, I often think of what I'd like my next boat to be. So here's my list of wants:
  • I need to be able to reach everything so I can rig and sail the boat single-handed (I'm 5' 6")
  • Lots and lots and lots of storage so everything has a place (I hate clutter)
  • Standing headroom
  • A frig/freezer where I can reach the bottom and not feel like I have to dumpster dive for food
  • A comfortable bed, a comfortable place to read.
  • A head big enough to turn around in with fresh-water flush.
  • A separate shower.
  • Comfortable cockpit seats that I are long enough to stretch out on and a nice bimini for comfort.
  • Lots of water (both hot and cold).
  • Excellent site lines so I can see where I'm going while driving (that short thing again).
judie
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Old 23-10-2009, 17:41   #70
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Shortly after I met Vickie (I told her up front I was looking for a cruisette and she didn't run away like every other woman I had met) I received my copy of Cruising World August, 2006. It contained an article by Tere Batham Titled "From a Cruising Boat to Our Cruising Home". The Batham's each grew up on boats and have a lot of miles under the keel and they have now been cruising their boat, Sea Quest, for (about?) 17 years. They extensively remodeled below decks.

Quotation from CW.

"A Complete, Compact Home.

Sea Quests 47 feet, now optimized, functions like a one-bedroom house with a kitchen, two studies, a fold out sofa for guests in the living room, a library, a garage (the engine room), a paint shed (the lazarette), and a laundry (a neat little tub and separate spinner installed in a space forward of the galley."


I showed it to Vickie with the promise if she would go cruising I would build her a sailboat home and we were NOT going camping. We now have a Pan Oceanic 46' with separate shower stall with seat, pilot house to hide from bad weather and a cockpit with enough room to stretch out full length under the bimini, aft cabin completely isolated from the remainder of the boat. The teak tomb galley and saloon will be redone ala a Herreshoff and the sleeping cabins will remain in teak for a dark snug place to rest. Washing machine and work bench will replace the starboard bench in he saloon. Vickie is worth every bit of the effort and we will soon be living aboard in El Caribe. I think considering the odds if you find a gal who will cruise with you IMO making her a comfortable sailing home is not too much to ask.
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Old 23-10-2009, 19:36   #71
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We are in our 60's and never boated. we had been on a friends boat and she had found that very confining and not comfortable from a safety standpoint. So I knew that she wanted the comforts of home but just as important she wanted to feel safe on the boat.

Around the end of 2006 we decided to give it a go and in september 2007 bought the Bluewater. When we went to see it in Charleston, it was docked at a floating dock and her first comment was, are you serious, this is way too big ! I said, just wait till we go out in the ocean with it and then tell me if you feel safe. After a four hour outing she was sold on that boat.

I hired a captain for the first summer to teach me how to operate it and took the pro boater courses with the Power Squadron.

My wife has been ill and is not very strong so we try to keep her chores as first mate to a minimum. I have a portable helm at the bow and stern to control the boat and still help her with the lines while docking. We handle it just fine on our own.

She is quite happy with the living accomodations as well as the entertainment deck. We do entertain quite a bit with day cruises and she loves to cook and entertain, we often go out with 15 to 20 people on board.

There are three staterooms, all queen beds, two heads, one with a tub, full galley with breakfast bar and stools, dishwasher, garburator, hot water dispenser for tea etc.., built in coffee maker, built in can opener, invection Microwave oven, conventional oven, electric range, 14 cf ref/freezer w/icemaker, wine cooler refrigerator, washer, dryer, 200 gallon fresh water tank, 20 gal hot water heater, 3000 watt inverter, 12kw diesel generator, three A/C.

Salon with reclining love seat and two glider chairs and tables, dinette for 4, lower pilot house helm, plenty of storage and closet space with 5 clothes closets with a total of 9 feet of clothes hanger bars, all make up the main living accomodations all on one floor.

The entertainment deck is fully enclosed and has, built in bar with refrigerator and ice maker, jenn air propane BBQ and stove, additional refrigerator & summer kitchen cabinet and counters.

The fly bridge helm Electronics are all garmin, with two 5212 plotter multi function displays, a/p, radar, Forward Looking Sonar, weather satelite, wind sensor, KVH satelite TV, security systems.

Power is twin cummins 450 diesels with on board fuel polisher. There are also bow and stern thrusters.

I felt that at our age, if this is the kind of boating we wanted, we did not have the time to start small and grow a few feet every couple of years, so we went for it, hiring the captain was great and we have no regrets.

To date our longest cruise has been 10 days, but next summer we are planning a 2 month trip from Windsor Ontario to Quebec city PQ. She is very supportive and can't wait for us to do it.

This trip will decide for us if we want to live aboard and go south for the winters or not, as this was the original plan but neither one of us is 100% sure yet, but hopefully, by next august we will know for sure.

Keeping Momma happy is what it's all about. In the words of Dr. Phil "If momma ain't happy, nobody's happy" Certainly works for us after 43 years.
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Old 23-10-2009, 19:53   #72
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RaySea Lady - Sounds like you have found nirvana. Well done...
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Old 23-10-2009, 19:53   #73
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reclining love seat
OK! I'm sold!
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Old 24-10-2009, 05:57   #74
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RaySea Lady - Sounds like you have found nirvana. Well done...

As close to it as we can get for now, but the boating season is only may to october here.

Thanks
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Old 24-10-2009, 06:29   #75
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1) seaworthyness
2) motion comfort
3) In good shape so I am not working on it all the time and (yeah I know, boat with no work - fantasy land)
4) Hmmm.. Hot water, Mac pack, electric windlass, propane stove with oven, good access to storage.
5) and to spice it up ( for all you popcorn eaters) a velvet lined drawer to put lace unmentionables in

Cheers,
Erika
You do not need a drawer for the lace unmentionables, they belong and look best on the deck, all other needs are spot on.
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