Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 02-06-2009, 21:43   #1
Senior Cruiser
 
schoonerdog's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2004
Location: annapolis
Boat: st francis 44 mk II catamaran
Posts: 1,174
Images: 4
Stuff That Works - Green Bags!

I's always eye these things at the grocery store, but thought they looked too hokey to actually work. But a friend swore by them and I took the plunge.

Green Bags (warning, there is annoying audio on their wen site, turn town your volume)

basically a plastic bag that extends the life of your veggies. Something about the amount of humidity in a small marine refrigerator -- our veggies usually don't last more than 24-48 hours. These bags stretched that time to at least a week or more! You can dry them out and reuse them too.

I love it when stuff works!

(schoonerdog's wife, Cindy)
__________________

schoonerdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2009, 22:35   #2
Registered User
 
Kiwikat's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: New Zealand
Boat: Fountaine Pajot Bahia 46 Maestro
Posts: 287
I agree. These types of bags are brilliant. A plastics engineer friend in NZ helped develop them years ago and used us as guinea pigs testing out the technology.

Strangely enough, I cannot find them on the market in NZ but they are in most supermarkets here in Australia.

I swear by them, both at home and on the boat. I now have a lot of Kiwi converts that put their order in around holiday cruising time.

Cheers
Lisa
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Green bags.jpg
Views:	110
Size:	515.8 KB
ID:	8391  
__________________

__________________
Kiwikat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2009, 04:11   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
Posts: 310
Not just for the boat. We use them in the house for lettuce and some fruit. Lettuce will last for weeks in these bags and gets crisper than when it comes from the grocery store. They really are amazing. Highly recommended.
__________________
Abaco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2009, 04:31   #4
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,573
Images: 240
I wouldn't bother with "Green" bags in any situation where fruits and vegetables would be regularly available (weekly). They cost too much for routine use, and I have my doubts about their efficacy*.

Notwithstanding, I'd be tempted to use them on long passages, when unable to re-provision for a month.

Stay Fresh vegetable bags are made from low density polyethylene that is coated with a fine layer of natural clay* containing high levels of a mineral claimed to absorb ethylene gas.

* Evert-Fresh Corp’s Debbie Meyer brand calls their proprietary clay “Oya”, describing it as a mineral form of Zeolite.

Ethylene producing items (such as apples, avocados, bananas, melons, peaches, pears, and tomatoes) should be stored separately from ethylene-sensitive ones (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, leafy greens, lettuce, etc.).
Remove ethylene with ethylene absorbing filters, or gas absorbers, such as potassium permanganate (KMnO4) or activated charcoal.

* What is the effect of ethylene on fruit ripening?
Ethylene can promote ripening in tomatoes, bananas, citrus, pineapples, dates, persimmons, pears, apples, melons, mangos, avocados, papayas and jujubes - a clear indication that the action of ethylene is general and widespread amongst a number of fruits. It is clear that ethylene is a ripening hormone - a chemical substance produced by fruits with the specific biological phenomenon of accelerating the normal process of fruit maturation and senescence.

Using tomatoes as an example, the life of a tomato fruit begins with fertilization of the flower ovules. After fertilization, the young fruit goes through a short period of cell division which is then followed by a rapid period of growth as these cells enlarge. During the final stages of growth and development, the tomato fruit reaches its full size and is now mature. This period of growth and development, from fertilization to development of the mature fruit, requires about 45-55 days, depending on the cultivar and the season. During the growth and development period, there are many chemical and physical changes occurring that have an impact on fruit quality and ripening behavior after harvest. Ripening is the final stage of the maturation process when the fruit changes color, and develops the flavor, texture and aroma that makes up what we define as optimum eating quality. The biological agent that initiates this ripening process after the fruit is mature is naturally produced ethylene - this simple plant hormone described and understood over 40years ago. While there are other factors involved in this "triggering" of the ripening process by ethylene, it is essentially a universal ripening hormone. When this internal concentration of naturally produced ethylene increases to about 0.1 - 1.0 ppm, the ripening process is irreversibly initiated. The process may be slowed, but it cannot be reversed once it is truly under way. So, here is the key point: additional and externally applied ethylene, provided prior to the time that the naturally produced internal concentration reaches the required 0.1 - 1.0 ppm level, will trigger or initiate - "promote" if you will - this natural ripening process at an earlier time.

See also:

http://postharvest.ucdavis.edu/datas...es/234-115.pdf

http://ucce.ucdavis.edu/files/datastore/234-91.pdf

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
“Manual for Horticultural Crops” Handbook #668
Small-Scale Postharvest Handling Practices: A Manual for Horticultural Crops
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2009, 04:35   #5
CF Adviser
Moderator Emeritus
 
Hud3's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Virginia
Boat: Island Packet 380, now sold
Posts: 8,929
Images: 49
My wife swears by the green bags. I was skeptical, but have to admit that they do work for certain fruits and veggies. The red bags for meat keep cold cuts fresh longer.
__________________
Hud
Hud3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2009, 15:45   #6
Do… or do not
 
s/v Jedi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: in paradise
Boat: Sundeer 64
Posts: 9,198
We use them whenever we go far away from markets for extended periods. They work really good. You can also buy special cassettes (much like the ones with silica to keep things dry) that absorb ethylene, and put them in plastic veggie boxes like those from Tupperware.

We experiment with the green bags often. Last find was that they keep self-fried shrimp crackers (kroepoek krupuk whatever you call them) good for hours instead of minutes.

cheers,
Nick.
__________________
s/v Jedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2009, 03:46   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Corpus Christi Texas
Boat: boatless atm
Posts: 722
Send a message via MSN to bobfnbw
I tried the local made variety once and was not impressed. When they say you have to dry the produce, and I did, but then there is no moisture absorbing system in these bags so of course vegatable are full of moisture. I found that in the high humidity of south texas they did not prolong the life much, at least not for the costs these have.
But Gord gave me a idea in his post so I did a Google on ethelyen absorbers and found these

Peakfresh Produce Storage Bags
Veritemp
DryPak Industries - Ethylene Absorbers
RDFreshBP


Seems to me that a packet of absorber in a Tupperware type container might be a better solution.
BTW where do you get the other bags for meat bread and such. The link to the green bags on the thread starter doesn't have it...
__________________
bobfnbw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2009, 05:26   #8
CF Adviser
Moderator Emeritus
 
Hud3's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Virginia
Boat: Island Packet 380, now sold
Posts: 8,929
Images: 49
Google "Debbie Meyer coldcut bags" for the red meat storage bags.
__________________
Hud
Hud3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2009, 08:57   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Cruising
Boat: Passport 40
Posts: 60
We tried using the green bags in the Bahamas and they really did nothing for us - fruit and vegetables went bad as quickly as they did out of the bags. A few of the other boats we mentioned this to had the same experience. Perhaps the climate here, or the lack of chemicals on most of the stuff we buy here?
__________________
s/v/ Pelican - Passport 40 #76, Home Port on Lake Champlain, Currently Cruising
BLOG - http://www.svpelican.com
Labatt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2009, 11:20   #10
Do… or do not
 
s/v Jedi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: in paradise
Boat: Sundeer 64
Posts: 9,198
I don't think they grow much in the Bahama's so it's probably all imported stuff that no one wants in Florida ;-)

cheers,
Nick.
__________________
s/v Jedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2009, 11:51   #11
Senior Cruiser
 
Talbot's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Brighton, UK
Boat: Privilege 37
Posts: 3,579
Images: 32
Vacuum pack, and they will last significantly longer.
__________________
"Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors - and miss."
Robert A Heinlein
Talbot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2009, 12:54   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
Posts: 310
Test them for yourself. Buy the bags. Buy some lettace. Store the lettace in the fridge inside the bag. Tell us what you think after a week, or two or three. I have been using the bags at home non-stop for the last 5 years. They work very well.
__________________
Abaco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2009, 23:17   #13
Registered User
 
toewsrus's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: New Hampshire
Boat: Voyage Norseman 430
Posts: 56
We tried them, thought things went bad just as fast or faster in the bags, threw them all out the other week.
__________________
Mike
Toews 'r Us
The slight variations in spelling and grammar have been added in order to enhance this post's individual character and beauty and in no way are to be considered flaws or defects.

Let's Roll
This is the Great Adventure
toewsrus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2009, 14:48   #14
Senior Cruiser
 
Therapy's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: W Florida
Boat: The Jon boat still, plus a 2007 SeaCat.
Posts: 6,894
Images: 4
We use them.
They work for us at home.
__________________
Therapy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-07-2009, 07:19   #15
Senior Cruiser
 
schoonerdog's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2004
Location: annapolis
Boat: st francis 44 mk II catamaran
Posts: 1,174
Images: 4
I wonder why they seem to work SO well for some and not at all for others? We need Practical Sailor to do a test
__________________

schoonerdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Plastic shopping bags knottybuoyz Off Topic Forum 94 25-12-2008 03:29
SSB Antenna Does anyone know why this works SariTimur Electrical: Batteries, Generators & Solar 13 22-12-2008 07:03
How to test if a tranducer works sailingpeanut Multihull Sailboats 6 17-08-2008 14:00
Wheelpilot works/doesn't mickmul Auxiliary Equipment & Dinghy 0 23-05-2008 08:43
pcs to a puzzle that works? terrydean Meets & Greets 14 27-01-2007 18:00



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 00:03.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.