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Old 08-09-2014, 03:03   #16
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Re: ARC Provisioning

some thoughts...
3gm of salt a day? 3 kg is going to last 3 years...
Yoghurt... I was taught how to keep a yoghurt production line going at sea by a spaniard...the one that bought all the salt
Porridge... not a lot of takers in hot wx in my experience,
Citrus? wash all in vinegar when it comes on board.
Cereal bars for the night watches... better than chocolate in a warm climate.
5 minute noodles ( fortified with Tabasco) and packet soup ... staples in Patagonia... are hard to shift in warmer weather....
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Old 08-09-2014, 03:09   #17
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ARC Provisioning

We had several mornings where porridge was very popular.

We mostly did stews , and or pasta dishes , careful with all that hot water folks

I did miss the odd Sunday fry up for breakfast !! , we did have some bacon rolls/butties now and again ! One guy like sugar sandwiches and another liked crisps ( chips ) sandwiches. !!

And 3 full sized serano hams , are you kidding me. !!!

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Old 08-09-2014, 03:16   #18
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Re: ARC Provisioning

and also.... salami, big jars of those german dill pickles, tins or jars of capsicum/peppers, olives,.....
And cabbage... don't cut it... peel it... will last for months.... my record is over three months.
And UHT fruit juice... I budget on a litre a day for 2 to 4 peoples
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Old 08-09-2014, 03:23   #19
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Re: ARC Provisioning

Well guys,

to each his (her) own. Do note that I said this was Peters list. It is based on foods he prepares. Obviously, tastes differ (regionally and culutrally) and a shopping list will reflect that.

Personally I agree with baking frresh bread every other day. And the pints of cream are for making the sauces that can turn "survival food" into an excellent dinner.

For some, this will be inspirational (I hope) for others not.

so be it
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Old 08-09-2014, 03:30   #20
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ARC Provisioning

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Originally Posted by carstenb View Post
Well guys,



to each his (her) own. Do note that I said this was Peters list. It is based on foods he prepares. Obviously, tastes differ (regionally and culutrally) and a shopping list will reflect that.



Personally I agree with baking frresh bread every other day. And the pints of cream are for making the sauces that can turn "survival food" into an excellent dinner.



For some, this will be inspirational (I hope) for others not.



so be it

It's very gourmet, and refrigeration centric, it's obviously a big boat ( 6 crew) with lots of galley facilities, I suspect the average 3-4 crew 40 footers aren't quite so lavish ! ( but then I learnt to sail with a guy that thought bread and butter sandwiches were all a crew ever needed !!!

Nice one, though , I could see it's the output of someone that likes cooking
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Old 08-09-2014, 03:32   #21
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Re: ARC Provisioning

Curry powder? Bolst's is my favourite.... you can curry anything ( beef, lamb, chook, fish, veg, goat, dog) but good curry powder can be hard to find in foreign parts
Also chutney.... ditto... can be hard to find at a decent price.

Those were amongst the few things I used to fly into my yacht in SA.. curry powder, chutney, good Korean or Indon 5 minute noodles, Branston pickle....

Oh.. and sail with some hot roast chicken if you can... catering sorted for the first 2 or 3 days...
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Old 08-09-2014, 03:59   #22
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Re: ARC Provisioning

Hmm! being an Aussie, I wonder about the one drink a day rule. Even our Navy works on 2 beers per man (woman) a day. I usually leave that up to the crew but being Aussies, 2 or 3 drinks spread over the day from lunch time onwards has never caused me a problem. In cooler climates, a dash of rum in ones coffee while on night watch is most enjoyable. Hence only 2 bottles of rum would never do! Besides spirits are cheap in the Caribbean but not in the Pacific, so stock up.

Re salt - my background is Air Force catering has proven that salt is a definite tropical requirement. Tropics result in excessive water consumption which leaches salt from the body and added salt to cooking not only replaces body salt but also prevents salt osmosis occurring where the natural salts within the food (vegetables in particular) are leached from the cooking water.Creates a salt block so to speak. Hence salt in the tropics isn't the boggy man purists believe it to be.
I've tried petroleum jelly on eggs which coupled with turning weekly has kept them for 5 - 6 weeks. Turning the eggs in their cartons ensures that the yolks don't settle against the shell which then becomes the point where air enters the egg sending it off.

Without being rude to my USA friends, but in some 60,000 miles of cruising I've found they have too great a dependence of fridges and freezers. Sure they are great and I have both on my Cheoy Lee 43 pilot house ketch, but make sure that you have back up non perishables in case of refrigeration breakdownds, the South Pacific ain't the place for refrigeration repairs!

Stock up with your particular brand of coffee. I found that most of the instant coffees in South America need a dash of rum to make them palatable! Bloody horrible stuff! Snacks are another thing you cannot have enough of. Especially when making landfalls and inviting others aboard for sundowners. with the advent of UHT dips and cheeses, there is a wide variety of snacks to keep both the crew and visitors happy. Don't forget simple things like papadoms which can be microwaved and served with dips, cheeses, etc.

Provisioning is fun, take abouar dwhat you like but go easy on the perishables.

Fair winds and slight seas

Evan
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Old 08-09-2014, 05:10   #23
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Re: ARC Provisioning

Hi Evan,

On the booze side, i am a little less puritanical than most. On a nice night, solo, when the weather is agreeable I will have 3 or 4 beers.

With crew, i think adults are fine. And have a few beers at dinner but the on watch person can keep it to one, and the person about to start watch to make sure his blood alcohol will be under .05 at the beginning of the shift.

When drinks are spread over the day: 1 at lunch, one sundowners, one dinner, the person will be under .02 so that is obviously fine.

If one cant calculate it theres alcohol meters on the net. Heres a good one for $120 http://www.amazon.com/BACtrack-Breat...s=Alcohol+test

Cheap one $25 http://www.amazon.com/BACtrack-Keych...s=Alcohol+test
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Old 08-09-2014, 06:20   #24
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Re: ARC Provisioning

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Curry powder? Bolst's is my favourite..
There was an oriental minimarket on one of the streets near the narrow part towards the headland, perfect for sweet chilli sauce and dried noodles, soy etc.
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Old 08-09-2014, 07:44   #25
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Re: ARC Provisioning

Given the amt of salt in any regular food, you are highly unlikely to run low on body salts. Daily recommended % are given on food labels.

Licking the sea salt off your lips would probably do too but there is no salt on your lips unless you venture out to the cockpit. It is a rally, folks tend to stay inside.

If in doubt, pack some sports energy drinks aimed at marathon runners, etc. These are tasty and an excellent source of salts.

You can make your own isotonic drink - mix tap water with a pinch of salt and some honey, add some drops of lime juice et voila.

Cheers,
b.
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Old 08-09-2014, 08:07   #26
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Re: ARC Provisioning

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You can make your own isotonic drink - mix tap water with a pinch of salt and some honey, add some drops of lime juice et voila.

Cheers,
b.
I second the usefulness of this, particularly if someone is suffering from diarrhoea or has been perspiring lots. Care should be taken with the quantities of sugar and salt used though.

The recommended proportions for rehydration per litre of water are:
6 flat teaspoons sugar
1/2 flat teaspoon salt
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Old 08-09-2014, 08:17   #27
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Re: ARC Provisioning

LOL I am one that recommends no sugar whatsoever.
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Old 08-09-2014, 08:27   #28
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Re: ARC Provisioning

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LOL I am one that recommends no sugar whatsoever.
The sugar is not for taste, it is actually an important addition for restoring the balance of electrolytes and the proportions should not be messed with.

This is an invaluable recipe to have (add a copy to your first aid kit). It can be lifesaving for kids with severe diarrhoea.
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Old 08-09-2014, 09:12   #29
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Re: ARC Provisioning

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There a lot of food there ! , quantities seem a little excessive to me. It's not a particularly energetic crossing . Most of the time your sitting around doing nothing.
I thinks that depends on the specific crew. I'm 6'1", 195 lbs., eat like a horse during crossings, and typically still lose @10 lbs even though I'm not overweight. You may think you're "sitting around" but the boat is in constant motion and so is your body, in one way or another.

There is nothing worse that worrying about whether you have enough food on a passage. Just sucks.

A few other general food thoughts...

I always look for unwashed eggs, which I've been told keep longer than washed eggs when unrefrigerated. I think the "coating with vaseline" thing is if the protective natural coating has been washed off. Get some of those plastic cartons that hold two dozen eggs...makes it easy to flip them every couple of days.

Hanging hammocks with food in them. I hate these. They're always swinging and if they are not making noise they're banging or just making the cabin a busy place of visual motion. By all means use them if you have no choice but I think they're for the birds.

Related to that, consider noise reduction when packing and stowing food. When you're off watch and trying to sleep, sometimes every little sound from the boat can keep you awake. The less rattling and rustling inside the boat, the better.

Cooking gear and how you cook...beware hot water. The number one injury on long passages is burns from spilling boiling water. Make sure your coffee making regimen is something you can do safely in a pitching boat, as well as other meals that require boiling liquids.

Alcohol. To each their own on this. I'm much more comfortable with no drinking at all, and it's based on a few experiences where everyone needed to be sharp, immediately, and everyone needed to have confidence that everyone else was sharp. 99.9% of the time a drink or two would be fine, it's that .1% that some believe it's prudent to be ready for. It all comes down to your tolerance for risk, and discussing it is akin to discussing anchors, guns, and whatnot.

Chocolate. You just can't have enough.

Safety margin. I'm most comfortable with knowing that the boat is provisioned for 2x the expected high average passage time, with 1x being non perishable stuff that you can always eat later if you don't need it, but 1.5x is adequate, depending on the voyage.

Passage box. This is an open-topped cubby box with nonskid on the bottom that you put on the galley counter with a compartment for everyone's coffee thermos/water bottle and snack foods. Keep stuff organized and easily grabbed.
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Old 08-09-2014, 09:47   #30
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Re: ARC Provisioning

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The sugar is not for taste, it is actually an important addition for restoring the balance of electrolytes and the proportions should not be messed with.

6 'flat' teaspoons of sugar = 30 grams sucrose. Amounts humans have never had in nature until slavery.

Even The American Heart Association says 6 flat teaspoons are the whole days sugar limit. To have it in one drink is like guzzling a Coke. Of course it will make someone 'feel' better because they have a sugar hit but it wont do anything for the electrolytes.


Quote:
The American Heart Association recommends limiting the amount of added sugars you consume to no more than half of your daily discretionary calorie allowance. For most American women, this is no more than 100 calories per day and no more than 150 calories per day for men (or about 6 teaspoons per day for women and 9 teaspoons per day for men).
Sugar 101


Glucose is better converted by vegetables or protein.
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