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Old 30-10-2013, 04:59   #16
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Re: Knot Booklet

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Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, 75RR, & JMR324, & Sparkes.
Thanks for the welcome.

P.S. If you managed to download the Knot Booklet I would like to know what you thought of it.
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Old 30-10-2013, 05:22   #17
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Re: Knot Booklet

Looks like a nice book. Some of them are way more complicated than I would feel comfortable using.

One thing that threw me off though:
Page 17, the images for both of 2b is flipped from 2a. They end up looking like an overhand but made with my left hand instead of my right. Having the loop flip from one step to the next made me have to stop and think about the differences a little more.
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Old 30-10-2013, 05:51   #18
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Re: Knot Booklet

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Looks like a nice book. Some of them are way more complicated than I would feel comfortable using.
If you are referring to the Bowlines I think you will find Fig. 17 and 19 easier than they look at first glance.
Fig. 18 is a little more complicated; and in truth, Fig. 19 is easier to tie and superior to it.

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Originally Posted by tlgibson97 View Post
One thing that threw me off though:
Page 17, the images for both of 2b is flipped from 2a. They end up looking like an overhand but made with my left hand instead of my right. Having the loop flip from one step to the next made me have to stop and think about the differences a little more.
The idea behind flipping them was to simplify the visual differences, hadn't counted on the "double take".

Thanks for your comment.
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Old 30-10-2013, 06:06   #19
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Re: Knot Booklet

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If you are referring to the Bowlines I think you will find Fig. 17 and 19 easier than they look at first glance.
Fig. 18 is a little more complicated; and in truth, Fig. 19 is easier to tie and superior to it.



The idea behind flipping them was to simplify the visual differences, hadn't counted on the "double take".

Thanks for your comment.
I'm new enough at tying bowlines that I have to do it the same way every time or I screw it up. So please take my inexperience for what it is. May be useful since knot books are most useful to those that don't know how to tie them. I found much of the information in the front very informative and useful. It was that information that helped me understand the differences in the types of bowlines.

Which brings me to the issue I had with flipping the images, and correct me if I am wrong, but if you look at a underhand loop from the other side doesn't it become an overhand loop?

I'm not critisizing it in any way. This is more of a learning experience for me to help undrstand knot structure.
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Old 30-10-2013, 06:51   #20
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Re: Knot Booklet

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Which brings me to the issue I had with flipping the images, and correct me if I am wrong, but if you look at a underhand loop from the other side doesn't it become an overhand loop?
Yes it does.
The main difference in Bowlines is that between Left-Hand and Right-Hand.
Overhand and Underhand is a tying preference, choose whichever you are more comfortable with.
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Old 03-11-2013, 05:52   #21
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Re: Knot Booklet

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Check out the icicle hitch. It will hold even on rod rigging.
not an easy knot to tie one handed hanging off the rigging though.
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Old 14-11-2013, 15:52   #22
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Re: Knot Booklet

Nicely done.

Having lost the knot on my foresail down-haul in some bad weather this past this past weekend (mercifully it let go when the sail was mostly down), my wife and I gave ourselves a homework assignment: Knots.

I think your pdf will be our textbook

Thanks

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Sailing out of Port Kinsale
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Old 14-11-2013, 21:36   #23
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Nice book
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Old 18-11-2013, 04:15   #24
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Re: Knot Booklet

Thank You!
As a newbe I need to learn all there is about knots! your notes will come in very handy!
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Old 02-02-2014, 06:18   #25
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Re: Knot Booklet

Not sure if ebooks have new editions or just get updates. Calling it 2.0
Changes include adding the following knots: Water Knot, Carrick Bend, Highwayman's Hitch and Tumble Hitch. Also added drawings of the Constrictor Knot in the Bight and the Shear Lashing, drawings showing how to join Slings and Recovery Straps and a little info/drawing on Slipped Hitches. Have also polished the text a little.
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Old 02-02-2014, 06:40   #26
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Re: Knot Booklet

Thank You excellent booklet
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:23   #27
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Re: Knot Booklet

Great book to keep onboard for practicing on a long leg of a cruise, or sitting at anchor enjoying a beer. If you have internet, animatedknots.com provides good animated graphics if you find pictures confusing,

Animated Knots by Grog | How to Tie Knots | Fishing, Boating, Climbing, Scouting, Search and Rescue, Household, Decorative, Rope Care,

I think it is wonderful that there are still a few people that take the effort to create something great and then provide it to the public for free.

Thanks for this book! It will be in my boat's library.
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Old 02-02-2014, 14:17   #28
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Re: Knot Booklet

Hi Forbes
I have finally had a chance to look at your booklet. Excellent content and presentation! I think anyone who reads this will find it very useful.

I picked up a few things I hadn't come across before - eg the End Bound Bowline and Lee's locked finish (I use the Yosemite finish a lot, which is ⅔ of this).
Not sure if I will ever need it, but I loved the Spanish Bowline .

A couple of comments:

1. Pg 15 your description of the Midshipman's hitch vs Rolling hitch are not as I understand them to be.
As I understand it, the Rolling hitch can be tied in two versions - used around a rope (where the round turn overlaps the standing end = #1735) and around a pole (where the round turn is made free of the standing end = #1734).
When a loop is formed and the line is tied back on itself, then if the version of the Rolling hitch is used for tying around a rope, it is called the Midshipman's hitch. If the version is used for tying around a pole (not as secure in this case) then it is now commonly called a Tautline hitch. I think there is some confusion around about the use of the term 'Tautline', which makes it hard.
Your diagram simply refers to the two examples as 'Midshipman's hitch' and 'Rolling hitch' when a type of rolling hitch is used in both versions.

2. Pg 18 is a bit confusing too.
The most secure simple single bowline and the one we commonly call a 'Bowline' is #1010 and it can be tied overhand and underhand. If it is tied left handed then it is no longer a #1010, it becomes a #1034 (also known as a 'Left handed bowline' or a 'Cowboy bowline', an inferior knot).
Maybe not putting both descriptions and figures under the heading of #1010 would make this clearer.
Also, a very common misconception is that the term 'Left handed bowline' refers to which hand is used to tie the knot and therefore the direction the initial loop is made (not which way the working end goes around the standing end after the initial loop has been formed). Maybe spell that out too?

I have a few suggestions for additional knots. I will jot them down and post them after breakfast.

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Fig. 18 is a little more complicated; and in truth, Fig. 19 is easier to tie and superior to it.
Could you check this please? I think the reverse is true - the one in Fig 18 is superior. Fig 19 is not recommended. It would be very useful to make this clear in your booklet .

Anyway, thanks for compiling this handy collection of knots into such an easy and clear format and making it freely available.
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Old 02-02-2014, 17:21   #29
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Re: Knot Booklet

Hi Seaworthy Lass,
Thanks for your comments; it is always nice to get some feedback.

1.) I will start with your comments on the Midshipman's hitch vs Rolling hitch.

I have found that Ashley’s comments generate some confusion, not least in myself, and have tried to simplify them a bit.

My head starts to hurt after my third reading on what he has to say on numbers # 1728, 1729, 1730, 1734 and 1735.
Reading the interpretations of his explanations in other Knot Books, does little to help.

I have called Midshipman’s Hitch when the second turn lies over the shoulder of the first – whether it is tied to a spar, another rope or to itself.
Similarly, I have called Rolling Hitch when the second turn follows the first, no matter what it is tied to.

If this seems an oversimplification, that is because it is – yet the reader does go away with a clear idea of which is which, and able to tie which ever of the two hitches seems appropriate in a given situation.

2.) Good point on not having ABoK # 1010 as part of the heading.
Have removed it.

3.) Your third point, re “Fig. 18 is a little more complicated; and in truth, Fig. 19 is easier to tie and superior to it.”

Refers to the EBSB +Y Bowline (Fig 18 in the previous edition, now Fig.21) and Fig. 19 refers to Lee’s Locked, (now Fig. 22 in the new edition)

As to whether the 1010 is superior to the 1034 is debatable, I believe Ashley was a bit prejudiced against it.

Agree with you on the Spanish Bowline … a beautiful knot.
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Old 02-02-2014, 17:52   #30
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Re: Knot Booklet

Thanks for the booklet
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