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Old 10-06-2012, 21:55   #1
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Contemplating the Future

So I'm at that age now in highschool where I gotta "set some things in stone". Namely, my career path, my post-secondary education, and basically, the general direction of my life.

So what I've decided so far : -I love and adore cars, engines, motorcycles; anything that makes a vroom sound and gets you excited! - Going to college; most likely for something in Mechanical Engineering - Automotive Area.

What I'm contemplating : - Living on land, getting a small house, and living my life like the rest of civilization, OR - Getting a monohull and living life like you guys!

Why I'm contemplating : - I'm seriously considering the "living aboard a yacht" idea because for the past 3 summers I've got into sailing, gotten my Bronze 4 level (its a Canadian Sailing Certification), and even gotten into sailing dinghy racing (Regatta's in a 420 are great fun!), and overall, I love sailing, the freedom the yacht gives you, the fact it's less expensive than a house, and how it frees you from the "rat race", but I have a few questions:

1. If you dont mind sharing; how did you guys save up for your "home" (assuming you liveaboard)? Since I'm going for a college adv.diploma-degree, I'd assumably get a college-level job to help save for it, but even then, it's always nice to hear stories and tips.

2. How does travelling work? I live in Canada right now; so say I wanted to sail to Brazil (just an example). I don't think I could just waltz in and say "Hey, I'm Canadian" and be good to go; would I? What's the usual procedures for legally being in another country?

3. What's a good size monohull for a solo male? I was thinking 35'-43'.

4. Just how self-sufficient can one get? I know you can get solar panels and props to generate electricity, and I know you can purify water, and I know you can catch/grow your own food; but can you ever really get 100% self-sufficient?

5. What's insurance like? I know you guys have a forum section for this, but when I went searching, rates were EVERYWHERE! What's the general rule of thumb for a 35'-43' per year?

That should be all for now! Thanks very much for all answers! I'm reallly interested in this way of life and am seriously considering it! I hope the fact that I don't own a boat yet doesnt disrupt some sort of untold rule in the forum Thanks in advance though!
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Old 11-06-2012, 05:15   #2
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Re: Contemplating the Future

best way to find out is by sailing on other peoples yachts.

lots of crewing websites like this one.
Yacht crew agency, yacht crew vacancy, sailing crew from Crewseekers
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Old 11-06-2012, 05:24   #3
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Re: Contemplating the Future

A boat like a house is expensive.. smaller boats less obviously. You have to have the money given to you or earn it from working and saving and like a home you can buy one with a down payment and get a mortgage. But of course then you need to make the monthly payments and so you will likely need to work (or win lotto).

Sailing, cruising, live aboard knowledge is like other knowledge... you learn it from books, the internet these days, formal school and hands on experience. You ultimately have to have the latter which cannot be found in books or the internet. No one can give you THEIR hands on experience, but they could perhaps have you gain some on THEIR boat (if you are fortunate).

It takes many years to *get it* because there is simply so much *to get*. And so it's a big commitment and eats up a huge chunk of your life. But of course it is, in a sense *a life* or a lifestyle... and it appeals to some and not to others... Some are into cars, or planes or camping or piano and so forth or many things. The more you focus on one thing and the more resources you have the better you are at what you do.

No short cuts.
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Old 11-06-2012, 05:54   #4
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Re: Contemplating the Future

Quote:
Originally Posted by Elemein View Post
So I'm at that age now in highschool where I gotta "set some things in stone". Namely, my career path, my post-secondary education, and basically, the general direction of my life.

So what I've decided so far : -I love and adore cars, engines, motorcycles; anything that makes a vroom sound and gets you excited! - Going to college; most likely for something in Mechanical Engineering - Automotive Area.

What I'm contemplating : - Living on land, getting a small house, and living my life like the rest of civilization, OR - Getting a monohull and living life like you guys!

Why I'm contemplating : - I'm seriously considering the "living aboard a yacht" idea because for the past 3 summers I've got into sailing, gotten my Bronze 4 level (its a Canadian Sailing Certification), and even gotten into sailing dinghy racing (Regatta's in a 420 are great fun!), and overall, I love sailing, the freedom the yacht gives you, the fact it's less expensive than a house, and how it frees you from the "rat race", but I have a few questions:

1. If you dont mind sharing; how did you guys save up for your "home" (assuming you liveaboard)? Since I'm going for a college adv.diploma-degree, I'd assumably get a college-level job to help save for it, but even then, it's always nice to hear stories and tips.

First boat I owned I found a really good deal and went in on the buy with a friend. Got my share from about 10 years of working and saving

2. How does travelling work? I live in Canada right now; so say I wanted to sail to Brazil (just an example). I don't think I could just waltz in and say "Hey, I'm Canadian" and be good to go; would I? What's the usual procedures for legally being in another country? About like traveling by air. Ever country is different. Some you just show up and present your passport and boat documents. Others you have to apply for a visa in advance. Absolutely no standard procedure. Have to research country by country

3. What's a good size monohull for a solo male? I was thinking 35'-43'.You could get by with smaller which would be cheaper, not just to buy but to dock, repair, buy parts, etc

4. Just how self-sufficient can one get? I know you can get solar panels and props to generate electricity, and I know you can purify water, and I know you can catch/grow your own food; but can you ever really get 100% self-sufficient? Almost impossible. No boat is really large enough to grow enough food to sustain a person. Plus you will spend most of your time around some island or harbor. Go to the store or market and buy food. Can be cheap in places.

5. What's insurance like? I know you guys have a forum section for this, but when I went searching, rates were EVERYWHERE! What's the general rule of thumb for a 35'-43' per year?Depends on several things. 1.Value of the boat. You can get a 40' for $25,000 or $250,000. Obviously insurance for the $250,000 will be a LOT more. 2. Where you cruise. Cost more in FL where you have hurricane risk. Costs more if you sail around the world vs day sailing around Long Island Sound. 3. Depends on the experience of the owner. Newbies with no time on the water will pay a lot more. 4. Depends on the kind of insurance, liability only or full coverage. How much deductible and how much coverage.

That should be all for now! Thanks very much for all answers! I'm reallly interested in this way of life and am seriously considering it! I hope the fact that I don't own a boat yet doesnt disrupt some sort of untold rule in the forum Thanks in advance though!
Bottom line, like others have said, got to have money. It can be done on the cheap but usually takes some serious commitment, DIY skills and the willingness to live simply to do so.
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Old 11-06-2012, 17:55   #5
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Re: Contemplating the Future

Quote:
Originally Posted by defjef View Post
A boat like a house is expensive.. smaller boats less obviously. You have to have the money given to you or earn it from working and saving and like a home you can buy one with a down payment and get a mortgage. But of course then you need to make the monthly payments and so you will likely need to work (or win lotto). That makes sense of course, and I am obviously more than prepared to work and save for a bot.

Sailing, cruising, live aboard knowledge is like other knowledge... you learn it from books, the internet these days, formal school and hands on experience. You ultimately have to have the latter which cannot be found in books or the internet. No one can give you THEIR hands on experience, but they could perhaps have you gain some on THEIR boat (if you are fortunate). I do have some sailing experience, though of course I don't mind going on some crewing trips during some college summers or something.

It takes many years to *get it* because there is simply so much *to get*. And so it's a big commitment and eats up a huge chunk of your life. But of course it is, in a sense *a life* or a lifestyle... and it appeals to some and not to others... Some are into cars, or planes or camping or piano and so forth or many things. The more you focus on one thing and the more resources you have the better you are at what you do. I wasnt considering this to be just a "hobby", I was considering this as a full-on lifestyle. Something I wanted to do and live out instead of just "living it on the side" or "forced to do it". I am prepared to being commited to it.

No short cuts.
Thank you for your answer!

Quote:
Originally Posted by skipmac View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elemein View Post
So I'm at that age now in highschool where I gotta "set some things in stone". Namely, my career path, my post-secondary education, and basically, the general direction of my life.

So what I've decided so far : -I love and adore cars, engines, motorcycles; anything that makes a vroom sound and gets you excited! - Going to college; most likely for something in Mechanical Engineering - Automotive Area.

What I'm contemplating : - Living on land, getting a small house, and living my life like the rest of civilization, OR - Getting a monohull and living life like you guys!

Why I'm contemplating : - I'm seriously considering the "living aboard a yacht" idea because for the past 3 summers I've got into sailing, gotten my Bronze 4 level (its a Canadian Sailing Certification), and even gotten into sailing dinghy racing (Regatta's in a 420 are great fun!), and overall, I love sailing, the freedom the yacht gives you, the fact it's less expensive than a house, and how it frees you from the "rat race", but I have a few questions:

1. If you dont mind sharing; how did you guys save up for your "home" (assuming you liveaboard)? Since I'm going for a college adv.diploma-degree, I'd assumably get a college-level job to help save for it, but even then, it's always nice to hear stories and tips.

First boat I owned I found a really good deal and went in on the buy with a friend. Got my share from about 10 years of working and saving

2. How does travelling work? I live in Canada right now; so say I wanted to sail to Brazil (just an example). I don't think I could just waltz in and say "Hey, I'm Canadian" and be good to go; would I? What's the usual procedures for legally being in another country?

About like traveling by air. Ever country is different. Some you just show up and present your passport and boat documents. Others you have to apply for a visa in advance. Absolutely no standard procedure. Have to research country by country

3. What's a good size monohull for a solo male? I was thinking 35'-43'.

You could get by with smaller which would be cheaper, not just to buy but to dock, repair, buy parts, etc

4. Just how self-sufficient can one get? I know you can get solar panels and props to generate electricity, and I know you can purify water, and I know you can catch/grow your own food; but can you ever really get 100% self-sufficient?

Almost impossible. No boat is really large enough to grow enough food to sustain a person. Plus you will spend most of your time around some island or harbor. Go to the store or market and buy food. Can be cheap in places.

5. What's insurance like? I know you guys have a forum section for this, but when I went searching, rates were EVERYWHERE! What's the general rule of thumb for a 35'-43' per year?

Depends on several things. 1.Value of the boat. You can get a 40' for $25,000 or $250,000. Obviously insurance for the $250,000 will be a LOT more. 2. Where you cruise. Cost more in FL where you have hurricane risk. Costs more if you sail around the world vs day sailing around Long Island Sound. 3. Depends on the experience of the owner. Newbies with no time on the water will pay a lot more. 4. Depends on the kind of insurance, liability only or full coverage. How much deductible and how much coverage.

That should be all for now! Thanks very much for all answers! I'm reallly interested in this way of life and am seriously considering it! I hope the fact that I don't own a boat yet doesnt disrupt some sort of untold rule in the forum Thanks in advance though!
Bottom line, like others have said, got to have money. It can be done on the cheap but usually takes some serious commitment, DIY skills and the willingness to live simply to do so.
Thanks for your answer, it was very informative!

1. 10 years? That sounds like quite the expensive boat. Say, is there large difference between those 250,000$ boats and the 25,000$ boats? I know obviously one has more electronics and automated things and more "frills", but at the core, would they both be safe and usable? (I know obviously not every 250k and 25k boat are the same, but just in a general sense)

2. Good to know. Probably helps that I'm a Canadian citizen. I know they're treated fairly well in other countries from experience.

3. Oh good to know, I was thinking I was needing a large boat to live by; but it's good news if I can go smaller. I actually dislike big houses and boats... I like nice and cozy ones instead, so that will probably help.

4. I didnt mean primarily growing, but also fishing? I find this answer odd because even when just going out for a few hours at the lake and fishing, I can easily catch more fish then I could ever hope to eat in the day and perhaps even the next day... I would think going even further off-coast would make the fish bigger, which would make it even easier to get the food for the day... I also really love fish. Is there really no one who can sustain themselves off the hook (or atleast a big chunk of their food off the hook?)

5. Makes sense. Thank you!

Thanks for all the answers guys, I'm sorry if I gave off the appearance that I want to take a shortcut or wasnt willing to commit; because I am. I just have a few questions that I would like to ask so that I can learn more about it. I'm not considering it as a hobby or anything "light", I am considering this as my lifestyle entirely.
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Old 11-06-2012, 18:47   #6
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Re: Contemplating the Future

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Originally Posted by Elemein View Post
Thanks for your answer, it was very informative!

1. 10 years? That sounds like quite the expensive boat. Well it was when I was 29. Say, is there large difference between those 250,000$ boats and the 25,000$ boats? Well, like the difference between a Ferrari and a Mustang. Ferrari is hand made, elite and faster than a Mustang but not ten times faster I know obviously one has more electronics and automated things and more "frills", but at the core, would they both be safe and usable? (I know obviously not every 250k and 25k boat are the same, but just in a general sense) Generally, you can find a safe, solid boat for a fraction of the $250,000. Just not as new and shiny, without the fancy teak trim and such.

2. Good to know. Probably helps that I'm a Canadian citizen. I know they're treated fairly well in other countries from experience.

3. Oh good to know, I was thinking I was needing a large boat to live by; but it's good news if I can go smaller. I actually dislike big houses and boats... I like nice and cozy ones instead, so that will probably help.

4. I didnt mean primarily growing, but also fishing? I find this answer odd because even when just going out for a few hours at the lake and fishing, I can easily catch more fish then I could ever hope to eat in the day and perhaps even the next day... I would think going even further off-coast would make the fish bigger, which would make it even easier to get the food for the day... I also really love fish. Is there really no one who can sustain themselves off the hook (or atleast a big chunk of their food off the hook?) Some people do well fishing but can vary with locationa nd season

5. Makes sense. Thank you!

Thanks for all the answers guys, I'm sorry if I gave off the appearance that I want to take a shortcut or wasnt willing to commit; because I am. I just have a few questions that I would like to ask so that I can learn more about it. I'm not considering it as a hobby or anything "light", I am considering this as my lifestyle entirely.
Hey, everyone has to start somewhere. Just be careful, it can be addictive. I had never been on a sailboat in my life. Went sailing once with some friends and within 6 months I had sold my business, move to FL and had a job on a boat. Was never the same.

If you have caught the bug may I suggest you go through the old threads on this forum. Over the years just about any subject you could imagine has been discussed.
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Old 11-06-2012, 18:59   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elemein
So I'm at that age now in highschool where I gotta "set some things in stone". Namely, my career path, my post-secondary education, and basically, the general direction of my life.

So what I've decided so far : -I love and adore cars, engines, motorcycles; anything that makes a vroom sound and gets you excited! - Going to college; most likely for something in Mechanical Engineering - Automotive Area.

What I'm contemplating : - Living on land, getting a small house, and living my life like the rest of civilization, OR - Getting a monohull and living life like you guys!

Why I'm contemplating : - I'm seriously considering the "living aboard a yacht" idea because for the past 3 summers I've got into sailing, gotten my Bronze 4 level (its a Canadian Sailing Certification), and even gotten into sailing dinghy racing (Regatta's in a 420 are great fun!), and overall, I love sailing, the freedom the yacht gives you, the fact it's less expensive than a house, and how it frees you from the "rat race", but I have a few questions:
!
Advice on the internet is worth exactly what you pay for it. Having said that...

Life is a collection of small choices made over time. You are about to enter a time in your life with hundreds of choices to make all with downstream consequence.

Education - You wanna sail? Pick an education that gets you close to water and oceans. Oil & Gas, marine engineering, nuclear or even (my line) aviation. Aviation has allowed me to live for 30 years in foreign countries, mostly close to water, and allowed me to do what I want. Basically any enginering discipline that has significant field engineering. There is a large expat community in many many countries. The reality is in the automotive engineering world you aren't likely to be near any equipment that goes vroom, vroom. You are likely to end up in a cubicle in a basement designing bumpers or interior trim. I hate to say it, but mechanical engineers are a dime a dozen. Get specialized.

Debt - get your education but focus very hard on coming out relatively debt free. My nephew graduated in economics and math and basically had no college debt. He picked a cheaper school in a cheaper area and lived very modestly during school. He is now traveling the world figuring out what to do next secure knowing that the doors behind him, getting that 9-5 job are still plenty open to him.

Relationships - Your friends and family won't understand your goals at first. Their paradigm is, go to college, meet a girl, get married, have kids, work long, die on shore. There is plenty of time for relationships, kids and all that later. I am not anti relationship but marriage and kids changes the whole game. Wait till your 30 or so to get serious.

The alternatives are - go now, forego the education - bad idea. Get the education and go cheap immediately after - not a terrible plan but you will likely be poor your whole life. Get into another line of work where you can make a pile and retire at 30 - trading, finance, internet start ups, yada, yada - still doable but extremely risky.

And I would pass on the idea to own a boat now and live on it. The hidden costs are too high and it would distract from the current goal of getting education done. Crew on some boats if that is an option near your chosen college. For living get roommates and get a flat.
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Old 11-06-2012, 19:06   #8
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Re: Contemplating the Future

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Advice on the internet is worth exactly what you pay for it. Having said that... True, but really, there is no other place to get opinions from liveaboards all over the world.. Except in person, but I cant just go around the marina asking people this stuff now can I?

Life is a collection of small choices made over time. You are about to enter a time in your life with hundreds of choices to make all with downstream consequence. I know, which is why I ask questions to be prepared. Look before you leap as they say.

Education - You wanna sail? Pick an education that gets you close to water and oceans. Oil & Gas, marine engineering, nuclear or even (my line) aviation. Aviation has allowed me to live for 30 years in foreign countries, mostly close to water, and allowed me to do what I want. Basically any enginering discipline that has significant field engineering. There is a large expat community in many many countries. The reality is in the automotive engineering world you aren't likely to be near any equipment that goes vroom, vroom. You are likely to end up in a cubicle in a basement designing bumpers or interior trim. I hate to say it, but mechanical engineers are a dime a dozen. Get specialized. I wasnt thinking mechanical engineer. I was thinking being an engine tech (the shop kind) or a diesel mechanic, maybe even marine. Again, anything with good oppurtunities and has to do with engines, I'm good for.

Debt - get your education but focus very hard on coming out relatively debt free. My nephew graduated in economics and math and basically had no college debt. He picked a cheaper school in a cheaper area and lived very modestly during school. He is now traveling the world figuring out what to do next secure knowing that the doors behind him, getting that 9-5 job are still plenty open to him. Luckily I already started saving with my part time job to afford college. I should be OK coming out of college debt-free or low-debt.

Relationships - Your friends and family won't understand your goals at first. Their paradigm is, go to college, meet a girl, get married, have kids, work long, die on shore. There is plenty of time for relationships, kids and all that later. I am not anti relationship but marriage and kids changes the whole game. Wait till your 30 or so to get serious. Of course, of course. Sound advice.

The alternatives are - go now, forego the education - bad idea. Get the education and go cheap immediately after - not a terrible plan but you will likely be poor your whole life. Get into another line of work where you can make a pile and retire at 30 - trading, finance, internet start ups, yada, yada - still doable but extremely risky. I'd never forego the education.

And I would pass on the idea to own a boat now and live on it. The hidden costs are too high and it would distract from the current goal of getting education done. Crew on some boats if that is an option near your chosen college. For living get roommates and get a flat. O lord no! I would never pass the education! I was meaning getting the boat AFTER college and AFTER I worked at a job for a few years to pay for it.
Thank you for your advice!
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Old 02-07-2012, 13:05   #9
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Re: Contemplating the Future

Aloha and welcome aboard!
Wow! I wish I had some concrete goals while I was in high school. I joined the Navy in my senior year. That was a contract written in stone and it got me to a lot of exotic countries.
If you really choose to stay on the water there are some careers and studies to pursue that would keep you close to the water. Oceanography, Marine sciences, Marine electronics, Computer sciences, Electronic engineering. A couple of more blue collar occupations that are always in need at marinas are diesel mechanics and refrigeration specialists.
If you are a diver you can also do underwater repair and boat cleaning.
As a single person I had a great liveaboard at 35 feet but could have been just as comfortable on a 32. If you become a couple someday then 36 is plenty big enough.
A call to a marine insurance company will get you a ballpark figure about insurance. Even a boat broker can give you some idea.
Good luck in your pursuits.
kind regards,
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Old 02-07-2012, 13:34   #10
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Re: Contemplating the Future

I'm a 27 year old Canadian living with my wife and dog on a boat in Panama. We both got degrees (me finance, her kinesiology), and quickly realized the 9-5 career life was not for us nor were there any good ones available at the moment. We worked very hard, and were focused. We tried the prescribed life, we bought a condo, cars, we even had a 30 ft sailboat 4 blocks away. We were living in Vancouver and the whole scene just was too expensive and not rewarding enough.

We sold our boat, and everything that we couldn't use on the boat. Rented out our apartment, and bought a 36 ft Union cutter in Florida. We now live on the boat while we work on sailing to New Zealand. Currently we are in Panama. There are lots of people who live on their boats and fly out to work for a couple months. Cost of living down here is cheap.

We choose where to cruise based on the location, cost to clear in, and length of time we can stay there. Go to noonsite.com for all that info. Being Canadian does not help with cost, but you can go to Cuba, and when we were in JAmaica people were way friendlier once they found out we were Canadian (half of Jamaicans have relatives in Toronto)

A good size for a solo sailor is the boat they can afford. My recommendation is to buy the best equipped boat, putting size second. Upgrading systems can be very expensive and laborious. 27 to 30 ft is a good starter, you can easily move up. Just go online and research, you'll find what is right for you.

It costs a lot of money for systems to make your boat self sufficient. Less is more. If you need a fridge and hot water, it will require more energy, and more ways of making energy. Go as simple as possible.

Buy a boat you can afford to walk away from and don't get insurance. walking away from $2500 at a young age is easier than walking away from $250000 when you're retired.

My suggestion is go for it, it will be cheaper than renting a place, if you can work while living off the hook, you will be very well off.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:30   #11
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Re: Contemplating the Future

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Originally Posted by SkiprJohn View Post
Aloha and welcome aboard!
Wow! I wish I had some concrete goals while I was in high school. I joined the Navy in my senior year. That was a contract written in stone and it got me to a lot of exotic countries.
If you really choose to stay on the water there are some careers and studies to pursue that would keep you close to the water. Oceanography, Marine sciences, Marine electronics, Computer sciences, Electronic engineering. A couple of more blue collar occupations that are always in need at marinas are diesel mechanics and refrigeration specialists.
If you are a diver you can also do underwater repair and boat cleaning.
As a single person I had a great liveaboard at 35 feet but could have been just as comfortable on a 32. If you become a couple someday then 36 is plenty big enough.
A call to a marine insurance company will get you a ballpark figure about insurance. Even a boat broker can give you some idea.
Good luck in your pursuits.
kind regards,
I think my plan is going to be to grad highschool, get a 1-year cert. in diesel, crew on some cruising yachts for a few weeks or even a couple months to see if I like it; and, if I like it: get my own boat. If not, then I can always go back and get an adv. diploma in auto products engineering and live life "in the rat race".

I do not think that diesel mechanics will be welcomed anywhere; I think it's one of those things that'll "take work away from the locals", which is a big no no.

Also, I'll look into those areas you mention that would be able to keep me out at water and also look into diving; I had not even thought of diving!

I think I will be doing ~36 ft. I doubt me going over 40' or 41' ft at max; but I don't think I'll be comfortable under 30', so we'll see what happens.

Quote:
Originally Posted by youmeandthed View Post
I'm a 27 year old Canadian living with my wife and dog on a boat in Panama. We both got degrees (me finance, her kinesiology), and quickly realized the 9-5 career life was not for us nor were there any good ones available at the moment. We worked very hard, and were focused. We tried the prescribed life, we bought a condo, cars, we even had a 30 ft sailboat 4 blocks away. We were living in Vancouver and the whole scene just was too expensive and not rewarding enough.

We sold our boat, and everything that we couldn't use on the boat. Rented out our apartment, and bought a 36 ft Union cutter in Florida. We now live on the boat while we work on sailing to New Zealand. Currently we are in Panama. There are lots of people who live on their boats and fly out to work for a couple months. Cost of living down here is cheap.

We choose where to cruise based on the location, cost to clear in, and length of time we can stay there. Go to noonsite.com for all that info. Being Canadian does not help with cost, but you can go to Cuba, and when we were in JAmaica people were way friendlier once they found out we were Canadian (half of Jamaicans have relatives in Toronto)

A good size for a solo sailor is the boat they can afford. My recommendation is to buy the best equipped boat, putting size second. Upgrading systems can be very expensive and laborious. 27 to 30 ft is a good starter, you can easily move up. Just go online and research, you'll find what is right for you.

It costs a lot of money for systems to make your boat self sufficient. Less is more. If you need a fridge and hot water, it will require more energy, and more ways of making energy. Go as simple as possible.

Buy a boat you can afford to walk away from and don't get insurance. walking away from $2500 at a young age is easier than walking away from $250000 when you're retired.

My suggestion is go for it, it will be cheaper than renting a place, if you can work while living off the hook, you will be very well off.
Wow, that's a pretty cool story! Glad it all turned out well! And thank you for that noonsite website, I'll definetely take a look at it asap!

I think my first boat will be my last boat; not to say that I will die soon in it or something rash, but I'm not one of those people to "move up". I think if I were to get a boat, it would stay mine until it fell apart before my eyes; I'm just that kind of person to stick to things I like. Maybe it's a bit of an addictive attitude, but moving up could be an expensive thing.

Also, I'm not sure about "going without insurance"... Obviously insurance on a 250,000 boat will be a lot more than a 2500 one, but then again I don't actually plan to get a big 250,000$ boat with an eight-cylinder engine and 24-karat gold bowsprit. I dont know; going without insurance feels weird to me... Besidse, insurance isnt "that" much, is it?

And thank you; the hardest part in this is finding a job I can do while abroad! I would love to live off the hook then come into the cabin, fire up the computer, and make some cash! Though it is very hard finding a decent job that I can do abroad... It's not so much about getting good pay; but moreso good hours and an enjoyable job...

Thank you guys for all the advice and help!
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Old 03-07-2012, 13:26   #12
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Re: Contemplating the Future

You'd have a hard time finding a job at home. Get a skill, diesel mechanics are needed everywhere.

unless you have a certificate, 15 years of experience, or lie about having such you won't get insured. Look how hard it is to get car insurance when you're 18, let alone one for a boat.
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Old 03-07-2012, 13:45   #13
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Re: Contemplating the Future

The best insurance is proper seamanship and heavy ground tackle. Anchors and chain can be bought, seamanship must be learned unfortnately, experience is not always kind and the tuition is often pain and loss. Talk to and learn from as many TRULY experienced and competent seamen as you can. Every waterfront bar has multitudes of 'Sailors' whose boats never leave the slip and their platitudes can bring you some grief if taken seriously. I have found while cruising that every new port will offer opportunity to add to the cruising kitty. If you learn the myriad of skills required to care for your own vessel they seem always welcome and sellable to local boatowners in your newest port. If you learn to sing and play for patrons of these waterfront establishments it brings you into the circle of the locals very quickly. While cruising I stopped at many small spots and nearly always was welcomed. Good luck with this learning process and always remember there are no shortcuts.

Kindest regards, Darrell
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Old 03-07-2012, 14:13   #14
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Re: Contemplating the Future

If I had to do it over again I would have joined the merchants mariners and done that for 6-10 years. Then youd have experience, and alot of $$ to buy a nice boat. and a good group of skillsets to do deliveries, crew etc,,,
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Old 03-07-2012, 17:46   #15
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Re: Contemplating the Future

Quote:
Originally Posted by youmeandthed View Post
You'd have a hard time finding a job at home. Get a skill, diesel mechanics are needed everywhere.

unless you have a certificate, 15 years of experience, or lie about having such you won't get insured. Look how hard it is to get car insurance when you're 18, let alone one for a boat.
That is very true; I am having a hard time just RESEARCHING for good jobs for my situation let alone getting into them...

And a certificate? Of what? I'm interested in this...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darrell Arnold View Post
The best insurance is proper seamanship and heavy ground tackle. Anchors and chain can be bought, seamanship must be learned unfortnately, experience is not always kind and the tuition is often pain and loss. Talk to and learn from as many TRULY experienced and competent seamen as you can. Every waterfront bar has multitudes of 'Sailors' whose boats never leave the slip and their platitudes can bring you some grief if taken seriously. I have found while cruising that every new port will offer opportunity to add to the cruising kitty. If you learn the myriad of skills required to care for your own vessel they seem always welcome and sellable to local boatowners in your newest port. If you learn to sing and play for patrons of these waterfront establishments it brings you into the circle of the locals very quickly. While cruising I stopped at many small spots and nearly always was welcomed. Good luck with this learning process and always remember there are no shortcuts.

Kindest regards, Darrell
Thank you again; it looks like I'm getting more encouragement to get my diesel certification; and that is assured! No matter what, getting a diesel certification from college is on the horizon! The only thing is; I just doubt that I will be able to sell it at EVERY port, and that every port even speaks my language (what if I go to Jap'n and I need cash?! I don't speak Japanese ); so I'm doing my best to find a job I can do anywhere (with internet) to help me with more stability. Even if I do get a job to help someone with their diesel engine at some random marina; I'll probably not get paid very much seeing as most other cruisers would be similar to me: Not the richest of the heap.

Thank you for the information though! Do most people run without insurance here?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dulcesuenos View Post
If I had to do it over again I would have joined the merchants mariners and done that for 6-10 years. Then youd have experience, and alot of $$ to buy a nice boat. and a good group of skillsets to do deliveries, crew etc,,,
Merchant mariners? I was thinking joining the army/navy/airforce for 4 years and saving every dime like a miser. That way I have benefits; a good starting capita; and some experience as well. Though the merchant mariners sounds intriguing, what is it? Do you have any links or information you can give me? Is this also availible in Canada?

Thanks everyone!
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