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Old 19-11-2019, 11:18   #16
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

Cast iron. I have read about European canal boats over a hundred years old that were water worthy. You would need maybe gun turrets fore and aft because you would still be in canals. On the other hand, people are really creative and when there are calamities people find a way to keep going and cobble together what is needed to survive. In Moitessiers first book he writes about a plan to build a boat from pallets and old newspapers waterproofed with something I do not recall right now. And he may have gotten that idea from an old blues song I heard that went " On a ship thats made of paper, oh Lord I would sail the 7 Seas, fight a shark, baby, with a toothpick, crawl home to you on bended knees, there isn't anything I wouldn't do just to get you on home with me". If a person was singlehanded and in a small craft I would think wood was the way to go. A saw and an adze and an augur wood do a lot in capable hands.
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Old 19-11-2019, 11:46   #17
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

[QUOTE=Ibetitsthisway;3018981]maybe you will find this "mindgame" interesting - taking the discussion of the "best" hull material into a "phantasieworld" in which most of the supply chains and infrastructure is not working anymore.


At one certain point of time, our arks will need some repair or maintanance, which vessel will live for the longest time?



- chopping wood?
- searching for steal plates?
- glasmats and glue migth be unobtainable?
- aluminium?


what about anodes?
which sail material?
which engines?


What do our boats look like and how do they function 25 years after "the day after"?[/QUseveral copper nickel alloys are very long lasting, no fouling, no maintenance lije painting, very strong, a little xpensive
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Old 19-11-2019, 12:01   #18
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

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Originally Posted by Ibetitsthisway View Post
maybe you will find this "mindgame" interesting - taking the discussion of the "best" hull material into a "phantasieworld" in which most of the supply chains and infrastructure is not working anymore.


At one certain point of time, our arks will need some repair or maintanance, which vessel will live for the longest time?



- chopping wood?
- searching for steal plates?
- glasmats and glue migth be unobtainable?
- aluminium?


what about anodes?
which sail material?
which engines?


What do our boats look like and how do they function 25 years after "the day after"?
Maybe it's how they are kept up regardless of the material.
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Old 19-11-2019, 18:47   #19
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

Serious question: what is happening with manufacturers going away from solid, hand laid glass. Now all vacuum resin infused cored below the waterline hulls. I wouldn’t purchase that hull but now getting more difficult to find.
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Old 19-11-2019, 18:57   #20
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

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Serious question: what is happening with manufacturers going away from solid, hand laid glass. Now all vacuum resin infused cored below the waterline hulls. I wouldn’t purchase that hull but now getting more difficult to find.
The answer is:. An infused hull is far superior and far stronger than anything you can lay up by hand. 50/50 glass to resin ratio is the goal. Hand layups are invariably over saturated, leading to a weaker laminate.

Foam core, resin infused boats are the best money can buy and strongest, pound for pound.
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Old 19-11-2019, 18:59   #21
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

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Hulls made of MREs will be very popular.
Practical, and Compostable!
Doubly Good.
SV Cloud Duster
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Old 20-11-2019, 10:43   #22
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

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The answer is:. An infused hull is far superior and far stronger than anything you can lay up by hand. 50/50 glass to resin ratio is the goal. Hand layups are invariably over saturated, leading to a weaker laminate.

Foam core, resin infused boats are the best money can buy and strongest, pound for pound.
They may be lighter but seriously doubt they are better than a correctly done hand lay up. I think it is driven by " the green back dollar".
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Old 24-11-2019, 07:13   #23
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

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The answer is:. An infused hull is far superior and far stronger than anything you can lay up by hand. 50/50 glass to resin ratio is the goal. Hand layups are invariably over saturated, leading to a weaker laminate.

Foam core, resin infused boats are the best money can buy and strongest, pound for pound.

I am sure a proper constructed aluminium boat can beat that.
A Ovni alu boat is on peer with a similar GFK/FRP cruising boat regarding weight in the same size but definitly much stronger then any plastic yogurt cup
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Old 24-11-2019, 07:32   #24
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

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I am sure a proper constructed aluminium boat can beat that.
A Ovni alu boat is on peer with a similar GFK/FRP cruising boat regarding weight in the same size but definitly much stronger then any plastic yogurt cup
Of course.

A couple points though. My post is only talking about what the other poster asked. He was asking about why so many boats are infused and cored vs hand laid.

The other point is I'm also posting in the context of this thread.

Special paints, hull degradation due to electrolysis, etc make a Fiberglass boat the way to go in the SHTF waterworld scenario of this thread. They can take way more neglect and don't need zincs or paint or anything. They just sit there floating forever.
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Old 24-11-2019, 09:30   #25
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

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The answer is:. An infused hull is far superior and far stronger than anything you can lay up by hand. 50/50 glass to resin ratio is the goal. Hand layups are invariably over saturated, leading to a weaker laminate.

Foam core, resin infused boats are the best money can buy and strongest, pound for pound.
50% resin is to high. JMHO
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Old 24-11-2019, 10:01   #26
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

SHTF "days after" . . . . . really the best answer to this question . . . . buy your own island.

Some of them are only for billionaires . . . . but there are occasionally quite nice ones available for very reasonable prices, just a little off the beaten path.

Otherwise wood would make perfect sense. It was the material of choice before modern tech (and thus potentially after it), and properly done is good even for ice.

Short of that steel - the welding tech will still be possible even with total collapse and there will be loads of scrap steel around to use for repairs. Good paint will be the real shortcoming.
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Old 25-11-2019, 13:00   #27
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

[QUOTE=LostBiker;3019277]This is why I moved to Alaska - just in case. Low population, lots of like minded former military friends, lots of good hunting and fishing, good water, lots of trees and lots and lots of boats on the coast and on the lakes that many people will abandon in a major disaster to choose from. I prefer fiberglass myself, but Im sure I wont be picky when it all goes pear shaped. Even a row boat will be handy.


You moved to Alaska because you fear the end of the world???

How many of these types of threads have you read?

Just saying.

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Old 25-11-2019, 16:16   #28
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

I would also prefer a good wooden boat. I believe that wood is a product that will always have the tools and material available for repairs etc. As has been mentioned, the material has been used for boatbuilding for millennia.

My second choice would be an older fiberglass hull, preferably with updated systems, but an old school diesel motor (same with woodie). The kind without computer chips and that can be repaired with simple tools and know-how. As has also been mentioned, these hulls last forever. The only problem would be if repairs are needed, and that could be problematic going out to 25 years of mad max.

I would add the fg hull would be non-cored.

My 0.02
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Old 25-11-2019, 17:53   #29
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

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They may be lighter but seriously doubt they are better than a correctly done hand lay up. I think it is driven by " the green back dollar".
Infusion creates a SIGNIFICANTLY higher quality part than hand layup. Quite a bit stronger.
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Old 25-11-2019, 17:57   #30
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Re: parallel to the SHTF thread - which HULL Material is best for the "days after"?

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50% resin is to high. JMHO
No, you're right. I had been thinking of a different topic. Should approach 60/40. That's what happens when you post while working on something else. Ha ha
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