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Old 24-10-2014, 08:32   #16
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

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live your life without labels and enjoy what comes along.
Amen, Zee!!
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Old 24-10-2014, 08:41   #17
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

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Amen, Zee!!

so why join CF with that attitude, maybe some people had it easy prepare for their liveaboard life, not me, and I am sympathetic to those novice liveaboarders who seek certain type of liveaboard life and are not send all over the place to wrong liveaboard, sailing school.... club... racers... situatons wating their precious time


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Old 24-10-2014, 08:52   #18
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

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so why join CF with that attitude, maybe some people had it easy prepare for their liveaboard life, not me, and I am sympathetic to those novice liveaboarders who seek certain type of liveaboard life and are not send all over the place to wrong liveaboard, sailing school.... club... racers... situatons wating their precious time


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Just out of curiosity, how would you define "wrong liveaboard?" I had no idea there was such a thing. What would be the wrong liveaboard lifestyle for one person may be absolutely perfect for someone else.

Maybe you need to rephrase your question (was there a question??) and make it more specific. What exactly are you trying to accomplish by moving aboard? The only thing you did in your original post is list all the possible categories (as you see them).
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Old 24-10-2014, 09:00   #19
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

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Just out of curiosity, how would you define "wrong liveaboard?" I had no idea there was such a thing as what would be the wrong liveaboard lifestyle for one person may be absolutely perfect for someone else.

Maybe you need to rephrase your question and make it more specific. What exactly are you trying to accomplish by moving aboard? The only thing you did in your original post is list all the possible categories (as you see them). What is your question?

Please read all posts. Wrong is in last post not judging a type of liveaboard but wrong type for person if that type of liveaboard doesnt suit his purpose and dream. It is not about labelling, judging, claiming anything anyone is WRONG. I just would like novice prospective liveaboards to be able to get advised by like thinking liveaboards. I think anyone reading posts of positive contributors can see that we have many types of liveaboard. My type of lieaboard on the hook in tropical East Africa cannot be learned in a marina in Miami.


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Old 24-10-2014, 09:56   #20
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

Oldragbagger Becky has a word of wisdom. “Let us be attentive!” (Byzantine Liturgy)

I enjoyed this conversation, as it touched a bit deeper than equipment. Sometimes the chat is not so interesting, and I wonder if wanting to say somehing is not often just for the sake of sounding off. So, with that reservation, let me say what I looked for – and provided – in a boat I lived on, while cruising from NW England (Lancaster) to Southern Turkey (Marmaris).

I wanted the smallest possible seaworthy boat in which I could stand up and have all the creature comforts I needed, including being able to take a hot shower when there was none available shoreside. She had to be small, for ease of singlehanding as well as for saving on marina fees.

I picked a Westerly Centaur, 26 feet LOA, twin keels and ketch rig. I installed propane, including a tankless water heater, vanity/sink across from the head with shower, moving the hanging locker and a newly built closet with shelves into one side of the V-berth area, while enlarging the other side as a full-size single, and I installed two additional water tanks. I never ran out of water. The marine head was only equipped with through-hull pump out, so I had to add a holding tank. Incidentally, the boat came with a fantastic Beta Marine inboard Diesel.

The boat was very sturdy and stiff, yet had a shallow draft, which was useful on rivers. I'm not sure about the ketch rig. Granted it reduced the size of the main sail, but I don't think the mizzen made much difference one way or another. I'm sure she was not great on a beat, but then I never needed – or wanted – long hauls into the wind. What was worse was keeping her on track down-wind. With a following sea she was unsteerable, certainly by autohelm.

But as for liveaboard comfort, I was as happy as a clam and fairly independent. Obviously, an affordable marina, when available, was always nice and, occasionally, necessary. (One could also arrive late and leave early, before the Harbour Master came to collect!) Along the way I picked up a bike, as groceries and other things were not always in walking distance.

So, as for categories, that was partly inland and partly coastal cruising, spending longish times in one or another place. But I wasn't roughing it anywhere. And, as Betty says, I had times for land trips, sightseeing, visiting friends, sitting still, and, most importantly, spending long times alone, ruminating on who I was, where I belonged and what my relationmships were all about. Like in a floating monastery: balancing friendships with solitude and silence, and contemplating beauty. “Wisdom! Let us be attentive!”
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Old 24-10-2014, 10:11   #21
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

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But as for liveaboard comfort, I was as happy as a clam and fairly independent.

So, as for categories, that was partly inland and partly coastal cruising, spending longish times in one or another place. But I wasn't roughing it anywhere. And, as Betty says, I had times for land trips, sightseeing, visiting friends, sitting still, and, most importantly, spending long times alone, ruminating on who I was, where I belonged and what my relationmships were all about. Like in a floating monastery: balancing friendships with solitude and silence, and contemplating beauty. “Wisdom! Let us be attentive!”
It sounds like you found a perfectly lovely balance that worked out well for you and serves the needs of your soul. We should all be so fortunate.
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Old 24-10-2014, 23:31   #22
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

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Originally Posted by Ernest Skublics View Post
Oldragbagger Becky has a word of wisdom. “Let us be attentive!” (Byzantine Liturgy)



I enjoyed this conversation, as it touched a bit deeper than equipment. Sometimes the chat is not so interesting, and I wonder if wanting to say somehing is not often just for the sake of sounding off. So, with that reservation, let me say what I looked for – and provided – in a boat I lived on, while cruising from NW England (Lancaster) to Southern Turkey (Marmaris).



I wanted the smallest possible seaworthy boat in which I could stand up and have all the creature comforts I needed, including being able to take a hot shower when there was none available shoreside. She had to be small, for ease of singlehanding as well as for saving on marina fees.



I picked a Westerly Centaur, 26 feet LOA, twin keels and ketch rig. I installed propane, including a tankless water heater, vanity/sink across from the head with shower, moving the hanging locker and a newly built closet with shelves into one side of the V-berth area, while enlarging the other side as a full-size single, and I installed two additional water tanks. I never ran out of water. The marine head was only equipped with through-hull pump out, so I had to add a holding tank. Incidentally, the boat came with a fantastic Beta Marine inboard Diesel.



The boat was very sturdy and stiff, yet had a shallow draft, which was useful on rivers. I'm not sure about the ketch rig. Granted it reduced the size of the main sail, but I don't think the mizzen made much difference one way or another. I'm sure she was not great on a beat, but then I never needed – or wanted – long hauls into the wind. What was worse was keeping her on track down-wind. With a following sea she was unsteerable, certainly by autohelm.



But as for liveaboard comfort, I was as happy as a clam and fairly independent. Obviously, an affordable marina, when available, was always nice and, occasionally, necessary. (One could also arrive late and leave early, before the Harbour Master came to collect!) Along the way I picked up a bike, as groceries and other things were not always in walking distance.



So, as for categories, that was partly inland and partly coastal cruising, spending longish times in one or another place. But I wasn't roughing it anywhere. And, as Betty says, I had times for land trips, sightseeing, visiting friends, sitting still, and, most importantly, spending long times alone, ruminating on who I was, where I belonged and what my relationmships were all about. Like in a floating monastery: balancing friendships with solitude and silence, and contemplating beauty. “Wisdom! Let us be attentive!”

Getting other often quiet liveaboards to come out of their liveaboard shell because they also share the feeling that CF shouldnt only be about equipment helps me even after liveaboard, at marinas, on the hook in different countries for +10 years! Not grandstanding, not judging, not negative labeling but genuine interest in the liveaboard great variety of different personalities is my interest. Imagine trying to understand what your possibilities are as liveaboard as novice interestee liveaboard. There are those idealist liveaboard passagemakers who try to keep their yacht as simple as possible, there are those who buy new 46foot catamaran, install dishwasher, washing machine, centrifuge dryer, after the standard model already boasts convection oven in the galley, separate crew quarters, owners cabin in one hull with glass walled bathroom over entire hull width..... I am amazed at the extremes we find amongst liveaboards. So I still like to know what sets them apart or collects them in rallies. I still would like to understand what future new entry liveaboards, the economical minimal and grand, have, on the hook, in marinas, how clubs adapt to new trends. I dont only talk about WiFi.


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Old 25-10-2014, 04:42   #23
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

It is not possible to categorize liveaboards. There are as many different styles of living aboard as there are people and boats. We all have different situations even though we may be doing similar things in the same places. Hudson Force put it well, there are different modes of living aboard, although he forgot the dreaded "boatyard mode" that we all have to deal with. It always makes for great conversation to share experiences with others, there is much to be learned that way no matter how long you have been living on a boat.
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Old 25-10-2014, 09:37   #24
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

WTF..
aint any RIGHT or WRONG in lifestyles..
LIVING LIFE is what you CHOOSE and HOW you CHOOSE to do it.
there are no rules regulating life or lifestyles, other than the basics of living in one's country of choice.
i think that, as there is no sechuvathang as a rule or regulation regarding how to liveaboard that mebbe folks should just go do what their lil selves like doing as far as living on aboat is concerned.
i do not understand this wak idealogy of there being a right vs wrong way to do this. there is no rule book nor owners manual for life, ditto life on a boat.
i do not understand this huge drama folks make of a simple and enjoyable lifestyle.
remove the expectations of having life exactly as it was on land.. it is not .
it is different.
exactly how different will depend on whether you CHOOSE to live at anchor or on a marina dock. that is your choice and only your choice.
there used to be customs and mores associated with residing on board, however, i have seen these bits of politeness deteriorate into total disuse.
this lifestyle has changed greatly within the years i have lived within it-- since 1990. not all the changes have been for the better
remember, only 10 percent succeed in this lifestyle.
perhaps there is a good reason for the low success rate.

btw--th eway others live may not be your best way of doing things-- the only guides are what others have done. there are no rules nor rulebooks (other than colregs, etc)
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Old 26-10-2014, 01:04   #25
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

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Originally Posted by zeehag View Post
WTF..
aint any RIGHT or WRONG in lifestyles..
LIVING LIFE is what you CHOOSE and HOW you CHOOSE to do it.
there are no rules regulating life or lifestyles, other than the basics of living in one's country of choice.
i think that, as there is no sechuvathang as a rule or regulation regarding how to liveaboard that mebbe folks should just go do what their lil selves like doing as far as living on aboat is concerned.
i do not understand this wak idealogy of there being a right vs wrong way to do this. there is no rule book nor owners manual for life, ditto life on a boat.
i do not understand this huge drama folks make of a simple and enjoyable lifestyle.
remove the expectations of having life exactly as it was on land.. it is not .
it is different.
exactly how different will depend on whether you CHOOSE to live at anchor or on a marina dock. that is your choice and only your choice.
there used to be customs and mores associated with residing on board, however, i have seen these bits of politeness deteriorate into total disuse.
this lifestyle has changed greatly within the years i have lived within it-- since 1990. not all the changes have been for the better
remember, only 10 percent succeed in this lifestyle.
perhaps there is a good reason for the low success rate.

btw--th eway others live may not be your best way of doing things-- the only guides are what others have done. there are no rules nor rulebooks (other than colregs, etc)

Indeed not to regulate liveaboard, or critizise that type of life style should be our red line tru trying to create categories of types of liveaboard in order to point novices to correct liveaboard type that suits them best so they dont waste time getting to live aboard!
Lets hear from more liveaboards out there who with their story can add to our knowledge base, can open our horizons because maybe we dont realize there is a type of liveaboard life lived by someone which we would like to live.


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Old 26-10-2014, 07:02   #26
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

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................ Hudson Force put it well, there are different modes of living aboard, although he forgot the dreaded "boatyard mode" that we all have to deal with. ............
Oh, you're right! I think I've tried to block any rememberance of this mode from my mind. ....'napping on the beach waiting for high tide to lift of the beach where we careened for a bottom job. Now, that was fun when we were in our twenties. Even living on board on the hard or under a tarp held some adventure once, but we lost any excitment for that! Now we usually decide to "land cruise" while our boat is in the yard for maintenance. Of course this requires a boatyard that you have confidence with. We plan our time on the hard with a place that works very well with us.
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Old 29-10-2014, 02:29   #27
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

Talking about different types of liveaboard. I encountered a wooden Zanzibar build schooner stranded inside a mangrive firest here in North Mozambique. The two crew aboard, from East African Tanzania fishing community, told me their owner, probably meaning iwner of the boat, visits them twice a year. Then stays 2 or 3 months. They think he is German original! The schooner has small genset, a 25hp 2stroke outboard, a small sit-on-top kayak. Only 3 beths inside the hull, small open galley. Beautiful wood, probably mangrove, low maintenance


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Old 06-11-2014, 09:00   #28
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

I still would love to hear liveaboard stories that enlighten us about the varioys posdobilities where, how, when, why different
people liveaboard?


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Old 07-11-2014, 15:43   #29
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

Fun thread. Here was my approach:
I had a Grampian 30, bare bones, I purchased her to sail her, not live aboard her. It occurred to me I spent a lot of my free time staying on the boat, so I asked myself "Why am I paying $1600/month for this apartment when I prefer being on the boat." So I moved everything into storage and moved aboard the boat full time, the same bare bones boat that I enjoyed sailing. Eventually my partner moved in with me, and we decided that we were going to start doing winters on the boat too (Great Lakes), so for every ones comfort (more hers than mine, I was happy as a lark on the 74 Grampian 30 with basically no systems- except a good head). So we moved over to the mainland and bought a fantasia 35. Which we also loved living on (even at 20 below). Then mini me came along, and we continued living on the Fantasia. He moved aboard at the salty age of 23 hours.
This winter we decided to rent a house, mostly for my wife's sanity with the little guy. I'm going to take the time to upgrade the already well equipped boat for a 6 month trip to the Bahamas next winter. Adding a wood stove, new fuel tank, new outboard for the Zodiac and figuring out whats wrong with my windlass.
As I'm still in my 30's and she in her 20's we can't afford to cruise full time, so we do live aboard when it's practical and cruise in pockets when we can.
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Old 14-11-2014, 13:13   #30
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Re: Becoming a Liveaboard Cruising Sailor

Sailing lady in West Coast Canada dreaming of becoming Liveaboard in the Caribbean...retired nurse in late fifties, attractive, slim, fit, active, easy-going.

Currently living on Vancouver Island, Canada.
It's cold, and it's old. (retirement mecca)

Searching for compatible Skipper I can be 1st mate for.

(Yes, I am the elusive, fabled, 'nurse with the purse'....but before you cunning Captains think I will come aboard just to be the sculley maid, cook and sex-kitten as well as provide the funds for following your dreams only, I have to tell you, I'm no fool....though am willing to fulfill these duties for good match)

Past experience of sailing/racing on Lake Ontario, have co-owned a 24ft. Shark, crewing here around the West Coast Islands. In 2012 spent three weeks sailing/crewing in the Grenadines-have always wanted to return and try this lifestyle. Feel I require a partner to do so. Suspect that living aboard/cruising for single female has overwhelming challenges....besides, am NOT that experienced to do it on my own.

Ideas anyone? Other avenues to explore to make my dream a reality?


Thanks!
sailgalkaty
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