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Old 15-02-2008, 10:17   #31
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I built my own fuel polishing system with a couple of MA500s, some fuel line and gate valves. Being quite anal about clean fuel. My little extra trick was to add a "T" coupling after the gate valve coming directly out of the fuel tank. On top of the "T" I added another small gate valve with about 12' of clear hose coming off the top of that valve. I carry 5 gallon fuel jugs on board as do many. I try never to fuel up directly from fuel docks so I dingy in my jugs and fill them. After the jugs have sat for awhile and most debris has settled down to the bottom of the jugs I take the clear hose tie wrap it about two inchs from the bottom of the stick. I then push the stick with hose to the bottom of the jug. I close the tank valve and open the valve on top of the "T" switch on my fuel pump and it transfers the fuel from the jug past the two filters first then into then tank. This leaves about two inches of perhaps dirty fuel at the bottom of the jug. I carry six jugs. I then break out my micro filter funnel and empty five jugs into one and let stand for awhile and repeat. Like I said I'm anal about fuel but I haven't had to change my primary or secondary fuel filters in a year and my vacum gauge still reads low. It takes time to transfer thirty gallons, about thirty to forty minutes, but to me it's worth it.
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Old 15-02-2008, 11:11   #32
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I prefer the highest quality shackles preferable made from Duplex stainless.
I have seen shackles break in the past and always of lower quality.
I am not suggesting that the Home Depot shackles are no good but I prefer to know the quality on items that could cost you your life if made of disputable stainless.
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Old 15-02-2008, 13:12   #33
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Interesting, this leads to another point, yes I have heard shackles like above used for anchor chain, is not a good idea, galvanized is better..strengthwise BUT if you source and pay for the right grade of SS then its no problem. Galvanized one will rust eventually, and threads cease.
I have SS shackle on my anchor chain and I rode 2 storms while away this season(upto 40knots constant for hours) and it held ok.

I do have a Rocna anchor which holds and grabs like no other anchor..adding more sudden loads on the shackle.
I am glad previous owner of my boat invested in a good quality anchor shackle.

A anchor manufacturer in NZ(not naming them) relented and went to China for SS ones, his 1st prototype came back and looked very nice, he left it in water to test for 2 weeks, it had surface rust within that time. Quality control is a major issue, only well known brands invest enough there to have valid quality controls.

Also agree if we keep going cheap to unknown brands and traders for quality(so called) marine gear..long term we are going downhill in quality and reliability.
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Old 15-02-2008, 14:46   #34
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I bought a portable, tablesized Stainless steel propane bar-b-que grill from Lowe's Cost me 60$ 3 year and still going.
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Old 15-02-2008, 14:53   #35
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Purchased a propane indoor gas heater with auto shut-off features. Heats up the boat very nicely, no installation hassles, ducting, routing, wiring etc...
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Old 15-02-2008, 14:54   #36
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A company call Railinc down in Ft Luaderdale has about the best prices on Sunbrella that I have been able to find!
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Old 15-02-2008, 15:32   #37
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I built my own fuel polishing system with a couple of MA500s, some fuel line and gate valves. Being quite anal about clean fuel. My little extra trick was to add a "T" coupling after the gate valve coming directly out of the fuel tank. On top of the "T" I added another small gate valve with about 12' of clear hose coming off the top of that valve. I carry 5 gallon fuel jugs on board as do many. I try never to fuel up directly from fuel docks so I dingy in my jugs and fill them. After the jugs have sat for awhile and most debris has settled down to the bottom of the jugs I take the clear hose tie wrap it about two inchs from the bottom of the stick. I then push the stick with hose to the bottom of the jug. I close the tank valve and open the valve on top of the "T" switch on my fuel pump and it transfers the fuel from the jug past the two filters first then into then tank. This leaves about two inches of perhaps dirty fuel at the bottom of the jug. I carry six jugs. I then break out my micro filter funnel and empty five jugs into one and let stand for awhile and repeat. Like I said I'm anal about fuel but I haven't had to change my primary or secondary fuel filters in a year and my vacum gauge still reads low. It takes time to transfer thirty gallons, about thirty to forty minutes, but to me it's worth it.
Wow!!!
That borders on obsessive. If it's something you don't mind doing and it keeps you sanity about your fuel. Have fun.
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Old 15-02-2008, 16:30   #38
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Magnetic

Take a magnet when buying ss items--high grade, such as 316, is non-magnetic. This won't tell you anything about the workmanship, of course. Lanolin prevents seizing of threads on anchor shackles. I wouldn't use ss for anchoring.
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Old 15-02-2008, 23:07   #39
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Take a magnet when buying ss items--high grade, such as 316, is non-magnetic. This won't tell you anything about the workmanship, of course. Lanolin prevents seizing of threads on anchor shackles. I wouldn't use ss for anchoring.


I second those remarks about lanolin. Its what we used on the fishing boats to avoid seized threads. Lasts for many years. I also think that heavy gal on anchor bits is the way to go as this is one place you don't mind weight and I am always wary of stainless in some of the anoxic muds.With black steel or gal, you know where you stand rather than some of the hidden fissures that suddenly let go with stainless. We used heavy gal with lanolin on the threads or lashed with tarred cordage with nonslip knots to prevent chafe. We also used gal rigging well-soaked in fish-oil then lanolin for the lower sections and bound with light canvas. But this was on a fishing boat so cosmetics were not so much of concern
Robert
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Old 15-02-2008, 23:54   #40
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316 SST is not "high grade". It is just a type. There are many SST types. Each is made for a specific purpose. Some are magnetic some are not. Just because it is magnetic, does not mean it is a poor grade. However, it so happens that 316 is non-magnetic. But in saying that, even if your magnet does not stick to 316, it may still be a poorly manufactured grade of 316.
Now to add even more complexity. Even if 316 rusts, it may not be the fault of the 316. In processing, 316 can become contaminated. It only has to be scratch on a steel bench or buffed with a steel wire buff, or polished on a pad that someone has used to polish steel. Welding and heating the metal hot enough to turn blue also can cause issues. The blue is actually oxides forming on the SST surface. Whatever the cause, you do not see the damage untill it has been in saltwater which starts the rust.
All SST has Iron in it. That is why the name Stainless Steel. However what makes stainless stainless, is the metal Chromium. This is added to the alloy mix and the Chromium at the surface of the steel reacts with oxygen and forms a gas oxide layer that then stops oxygen from oxidising the surface any further. Where the Chromium has been damaged or contaminated by any of the above, pure iron is then exposed to oxygen and the rust is a result. To remedy this, the Chromium has to be brought to the surface so as it oxidises and covers the iron. This is done in two ways and often both in a sequence. Firstly a very poweful acid in the form of a gel is used on welds to etch away all the iron and other impurities. Chromium does not react well, so it remains on the surface. The "blue'ing" should disapear after the treatment. Polishing is then done. This also helps in bringing more chromium to the surface. Iron and a few other alloys in the SST are much softer than Chromium and so polishing wears away the softer metals and leaves the harder Chromium behind.
If an anchor or any SST piece rusts, it is worth trying those two things, as sometimes the SST is actually OK. It just hasn't had the level of work carried out on it.
Normaly passivating is done with Hydrochloric Acid Gel in a very powerful form. But for a much safer way, the use of Phosporic acid will remove most rust stains and leave the SST looking great. Polishing is a little harder work
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Old 16-02-2008, 14:09   #41
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Purchased a propane indoor gas heater with auto shut-off features. Heats up the boat very nicely, no installation hassles, ducting, routing, wiring etc...
Strygaldwir,

What heater did you buy? Are there really indoor propane heaters? I thought all of them had CO potential issues - and even the ones rated indoor had warnings to not use in enclosed spaces.

Mark
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Old 16-02-2008, 16:40   #42
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If you are buying stainless steel fron unnamed sources buy it well oversized. You might also get it x-rayed. There are stories of breakeges of rigging screws etc which made life difficult aboard for the purchasors. The last thing one would need in a blow would be a sheared anchor shackle pin.

Galvanised stuff you can test yourselves--just load it up to a safety margin above what you will ever need. If it busts go a size larger and repeat until there is no distortion. Good quality stuff will have the test load stamped on the side. Rubbish you take your chances--it might be good--it might not. You are betting your life on it.

Stainless is a different thing entirely. Stainless can fatigue and break without any prior warning. One minute it looks great--the next it has snapped. I stopped using stainless steel winch cable for this reason.

Put your affairs in order before using an indoor open flame heater.
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Old 19-02-2008, 11:22   #43
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Wow!!!
That borders on obsessive. If it's something you don't mind doing and it keeps you sanity about your fuel. Have fun.


Me? Obsessive?
Have you been talking to my wife?
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Old 19-02-2008, 12:58   #44
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"High grade" stainless steel

I think it is reasonable to describe 316 as high grade, in as much as the issue being addressed is its "stainlessness" This is not to say that the most stainless is the strongest. The two grades in common use in the marine environment are 304 & 305, which is less stainless, and 316, which is more so. To amplify on the stainless issue, stainless steel is stainless because it forms a hard oxide covering when exposed to oxygen. Where there is no oxygen present, such as in a crevice filled with stagnant water, there is nothing particularly stainless about stainless steel. The United States Coast Guard Marine Safety Office (which regulates the construction of commercial passenger-carrying vessels in the U.S.) refers to 316 as being a higher grade than 304 or 305, where corrosion is the issue-and why would you use stainless if corrosion weren't the issue? See Stainless Steel Information Knowledge alloys 316 304
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Old 19-02-2008, 15:03   #45
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How come I never hear anybody talk or rather write about Duplex stainless steel , one can get anchor chain and all sizes of warps made from this very high grade stainless.
We use it as our standard anchor chain , 8 mm chain holds 6000 kilo,s
It is fantastic.
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