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Old 27-08-2014, 12:17   #16
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Re: You are sailing a tri very fast on a close reach. A crewman holds the jib sheet.

I would dump the windward cap shroud.
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Old 27-08-2014, 16:26   #17
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Re: You are sailing a tri very fast on a close reach. A crewman holds the jib sheet.

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I would dump the windward cap shroud.
In addition to the weakness of the humor, most fast tris don't have cap shrouds. The same could be said of most fast cats. Even my slow cat doesn't have them (shrouds and diamond wires).
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Old 27-08-2014, 16:30   #18
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Re: You are sailing a tri very fast on a close reach. A crewman holds the jib sheet.

Aaarhooga aarhooga sense of humor failure...

The thought of that scenario scares me. I could not imagine my home being in that situation, I mean the fish tank would spill.

Anyway what do you call that thick wire thing that holds the mast up?
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Old 27-08-2014, 21:23   #19
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Re: You are sailing a tri very fast on a close reach. A crewman holds the jib sheet.

From years of racing Corsair trimarans, as well as capsizing a F 31 trimaran in Newport RI, we drop the traveler first.
If going fast while racing, you do not let both sails go. You need to get the bows up and right back to sailing fast. The driver comes up, the traveler goes down and, if still not enough, ease the main sheet.


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Old 27-08-2014, 21:39   #20
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Re: You are sailing a tri very fast on a close reach. A crewman holds the jib sheet.

I have no idea, but if I spill my martini, somebody's gonna get yelled at.
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Old 27-08-2014, 23:21   #21
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Re: You are sailing a tri very fast on a close reach. A crewman holds the jib sheet.

According to my good hard racing picklefork friends, Dump main, and not much else. If the stern is out of the water the rudder won't do much, and the jib may in fact provide some lift, but in an event you want to get going again quickly.

Dont yell at me if you disgaree, that comment was from hard racing trimaran friends.
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Old 28-08-2014, 02:28   #22
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Not (obviously) a close reach, but Coville's famous...

"almost capsize". Apparently, he doesn't have much time to do anything but to frantically turn the wheel counter-clockwise and head down...and, he j-u-s-t made it, at the 2:50 mark.

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Old 28-08-2014, 03:31   #23
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Re: You are sailing a tri very fast on a close reach. A crewman holds the jib sheet.

Tapas alk


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Old 28-08-2014, 07:14   #24
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Re: You are sailing a tri very fast on a close reach. A crewman holds the jib sheet.

This just goes to show you the difference between racing and cruising. In racing this type of thing occurs quite often when the wind is up a bit. The problem is usually corrected before it happens with steering but not always.

The same on a broad reach with the spinnaker up but you turn down instead of up. We are talking speeds in the neighborhood of 15-23+ knots.

Checkout these NACRA 17's dealing with high wind conditions. Most of the action usually occurs at the downwind mark when transitioning from spinnaker to upwind mode.

Like the guy said above, it would be best to have crew with beach cat sailing/racing experience.

Of course, I'm thinking most racers if they actually owned a very expensive cruising multihull would probably just sail very concervatively when the wind was up and sail on the edge on something a bit smaller and cheaper.


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Old 28-08-2014, 08:02   #25
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Re: You are sailing a tri very fast on a close reach. A crewman holds the jib sheet.

And THIS is why I always suggest learning to sail on a small boat. The price of experimentation on a larger boat is simply too high.

For those who feel they will never sail fast, remember that high speed boat handling is for storms too. If you learn to sail fast you will have a better feeling for what your options are and what "bad" feels like as it approaches.

Sail Delmarva: The Merits of Learning to Sail on a Small Boat

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Old 28-08-2014, 08:07   #26
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Re: Not (obviously) a close reach, but Coville's famous...

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"almost capsize". Apparently, he doesn't have much time to do anything but to frantically turn the wheel counter-clockwise and head down...and, he j-u-s-t made it, at the 2:50 mark.

Most tris don't have rudders on the floats. It's clear why these do.
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Old 28-08-2014, 08:14   #27
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Re: You are sailing a tri very fast on a close reach. A crewman holds the jib sheet.

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Aaarhooga aarhooga sense of humor failure...

The thought of that scenario scares me. I could not imagine my home being in that situation, I mean the fish tank would spill.

Anyway what do you call that thick wire thing that holds the mast up?
A nomenclature thing, perhaps. Since many fast multis do not have lower shrouds, the "cap shrouds" are just shrouds. The lower mast is supported either with diamond wires or is large enough in section to be unsupported (wing mast). The reason for the difference is 3 fold:
1. rotating masts.
2. greater beam.
3. Reducing compression loads on the cross beams.

Because the boats do not heel much, weight aloft is less important... until things go pear shaped.
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Old 28-08-2014, 08:54   #28
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Re: You are sailing a tri very fast on a close reach. A crewman holds the jib sheet.

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If it really a close reach, the answer is pretty clear - dump mainsail and turn up.

If it is a broader reach, then you are in what is called "the death zone" where both turning up and down are bad and where de powering the main may not work (at least fast enough), so you are left with dumping the jib.

Then on a deep reach, you turn off and dump the jib.
Agreed.. Have done this before, or if possible, just turn the boat out of the wind.
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