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Old 11-10-2008, 19:47   #1
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Piver 40 Trimaran

Hi, l have a chance to buy a 40 ft Piver Trimaran. It is marine plywood covered with fiberglass. It has been sitting for a few years in the water at dock and it needs a lot of work. It has a musty, moldy problem, it positively stinks. Can one ever get rid of this smell? My girlfriend is alergic to this stuff big time. Should l even buy this boat? Thanks in advance. Ger44
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Old 11-10-2008, 23:09   #2
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I debated with myself for awhile about weather to respond to this post, but I will for your sake.

The answer to your question,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ger44
Should l even buy this boat?
is NO!

I'm not trying to be a jerk but it's obvious you know little about boats. This boat you speak of is not one for a first time buyer. And besides, I'd hate to see you loose your girlfriend over a musty boat.

Depending on the age and real condition of the boat you may not see your girlfriend very much anymore unless she's willing to help out. Fat chance there, I would guess!

Anyway, take it from us (I'm sure I'm not the only one rolling my eyes) this would be a step off the pier with your eyes closed. Read my quote below....................._/)
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Old 11-10-2008, 23:53   #3
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What Del said...
I have a Piver Lodestar that is nearing completion from a bare hull. If you smell the mold (most likely dry rot), it is a big project at best. There are areas in the connectors that are prone to rot. It would be easier to build the boat from the ground up, than to repair rot in these areas.
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Old 08-12-2008, 11:49   #4
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I just had to join the forum to give you kudos on your candor. This gentleman does not need a project West system boat. I've had two, great boats but they had been maintained. A Piver and a Brown.

Again, thanks for being honest with him.
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Old 06-01-2009, 17:01   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delmarrey View Post
I debated with myself for awhile about weather to respond to this post, but I will for your sake.

The answer to your question,


is NO!

I'm not trying to be a jerk but it's obvious you know little about boats. This boat you speak of is not one for a first time buyer. And besides, I'd hate to see you loose your girlfriend over a musty boat.

Depending on the age and real condition of the boat you may not see your girlfriend very much anymore unless she's willing to help out. Fat chance there, I would guess!

Anyway, take it from us (I'm sure I'm not the only one rolling my eyes) this would be a step off the pier with your eyes closed. Read my quote below....................._/)
NO...NO...NO...IS THERE A PART OF NO YOU MIGHT HAVE A PROBLEM WITH?
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Old 06-01-2009, 17:43   #6
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Trifun,

Did I miss something? I didn't see anything that indicated Ger44 didn't understand the no.

If he didn't that's his problem however I did't see him respond that he didn't.
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Old 06-01-2009, 19:28   #7
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experience says no

My vote I did this once NO. Heres why You will do much better off shopping for a high end boat that has suffered a single catastrophic failure.Spend hours addressing that failure. Now presumpably you have hull integrity and avessel with resale value. On a ply glassboat you can assume that you will always be scheduling the next refit replanking and more importantly future buyers will asuume that work will continue. You will very likely become a slave to all that is desired byy our now boat bitch. I did it my stories are fun I lived aboard the whore loved her. replaced so much and did it well. I was impressed in many areas how the ply and glass held up. But I also replaced 40% of the sheathing chain plates were redone horn timber transom shaft log yadddahh. It was fun I was young and i sailed but now I know I would do it different it worked for me but to do it again I would find that hgh end boat with some singular defficiency before buying into a project that will never end.
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Old 04-02-2010, 04:34   #8
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I'm sooo glad I found this site. I AM a "First time buyer" and plan on looking at 1 of 2 40' Piver Tri's. I can get into either under 10k; however, each are considered "Project" boats. I hope you all will continue to keep us well informed with your experience. Feel free to direct a "Rookie" towards a more appropriate bout that he, his girlfrien and his 15yo son can live aboard and cruise in the most "GREEN" way possible.
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Old 04-02-2010, 17:56   #9
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I hate to say it..... but if that's your budget you will be better off in a simple 30-ish feet SOLID fiberglass monohull......

And, I echo the others. If you have to ask, the answer is "NO". Only those with lots of tools and experience should even think of doing that. We wouldn't though, because it would be an endless project without being able to sail in the meantime, and it would cost a LOT of money (materials are expensive) and in the end it would not be even close to worth what we had into it. So, one would indeed be better off starting from scratch and doing it right.

Which is why it's sitting there cheap waiting for a sucker in the first place.
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Old 04-02-2010, 18:25   #10
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Old 04-02-2010, 19:07   #11
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I have spent the last year in something of a similar situation; I purchased a Brown Searunner trimaran (by all reports a significant improvement over the Piver designs), built in 1984, and immediately moved onboard fulltime. I have spent far more time repairing and upgrading her than I have spent sailing - admittedly I've had to learn how to do everything, coming in with next to zero experience, and I will admit that I have taken a great deal of pleasure in the work and the personal growth. I expect to have her ready to undergo longer voyages by summer 2010, but by then I will have spent over double her initial cost, and literally thousands of hours of work.

I do not regret my purchase; I have grown as a person as a result of this experience. However if I knew at the onset what I know now, I would have spent more time deciding whether I wanted to be a cruising sailor, or a carpenter/painter/fiberglasser/electrician/mechanic/chimneysweep who also sails sometimes.
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Old 04-02-2010, 23:19   #12
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Yeah, kinda like life...If I hadda known some of the things i know now i would have bitten that DR's fingers off and said leave me be..this garage is closed!!!!
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Old 05-02-2010, 01:39   #13
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Exactly what I needed to hear before jumping. However; still need the advice on a good fit. Again...three aboard, looking to go as green (off the grid) as possible. Love the space on motor boats, but want to eventually make long journeys. IE: CA to HI. Im under the impression a motor boat can't do this.

Appriciate the help. Eager to learn from sincere advice and able to laugh at the wise cracks.
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Old 05-02-2010, 08:14   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmd063 View Post
Exactly what I needed to hear before jumping. However; still need the advice on a good fit. Again...three aboard, looking to go as green (off the grid) as possible. Love the space on motor boats, but want to eventually make long journeys. IE: CA to HI. Im under the impression a motor boat can't do this.

Appriciate the help. Eager to learn from sincere advice and able to laugh at the wise cracks.
I don't have any great suggestions - however, for some inspiration, consider checking out this (free download) movie:

The Anarchist Yacht Clubb: Hold Fast

the biggest thing to moving onboard is adapting to how very little stuff you actually need to get by. just living on a boat is already hundreds of times more "green" than living in a house; 40 gallons of water per week instead of 350 gallons per day (national average), electricity carefully conserved, heating only a small space instead of entire rooms you're not even using, only using fuel when going in or out of a harbour, etc, etc. don't worry too much about the "going green" part, it comes automatically!
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Old 09-05-2011, 14:42   #15
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Re: Piver 40 Trimaran

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Originally Posted by Kelldog View Post
Yeah, kinda like life...If I hadda known some of the things i know now i would have bitten that DR's fingers off and said leave me be..this garage is closed!!!!
Just a thumbs up on your avatar.
That was my Piver AA 41' for 38 years or more.
"Star Trek"
Quite famous in Southern California racing.
Winner multihul transpac and had 30 Ensenada races.
Built and launched in 1968 It took me to the South Pacific back in the late 1970's

A real beauty. I miss it almost daily.

Billy Stein
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