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Old 23-02-2017, 17:25   #61
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

Just wanted to make the following link:

Comfort/stability of 33, 37 and 40' production boats in blue water?

Though the linked thread drifts somewhat away from my initial question, and the range 33-44ft is a less that what I put on the table (40 vs 50ft), in general it is also related. As "comfort" and "well being" are also relating to seasickness.

Just thought it might be reasonable to be added here in cases others find it useful in the context.
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Old 23-02-2017, 17:27   #62
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

For me it's usually one or
More of two things:
1: hangover
2: air quality below decks. Hot, humid, or smelly. Feel like I have to come up for air...
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Old 23-02-2017, 17:48   #63
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

In my case, I am most likely to get sea sick in seas that are uncomfortable enough to make holding on to something necessary when walking around the boat than in heavier or lighter seas. For me, that typically means that a bigger boat is preferable. It takes significantly heavier seas to get to that point on my 64' stabilized boat than on my buddy's top heavy 39' non-stabilized boat. But if the seas get bad enough that they can't be ignored, my risk of sea sickness goes way down. In seas big enough to create that condition on my buddy's boat, my boat would still be in the hold on to walk around zone -- to which I am most prone to seasickness. So, ironically, depending on sea state, and at least for people like me, bigger isn't always better, though it usually is.

That said, I have had the opportunity to observe others, as well as to study my own reactions, for a long time, and about my only conclusions are that a) just about everyone can get sea sick in some circumstances, and b) none of the generalities are anywhere close to universally true. Empty stomach / full stomach, drink or not, look at the horizon or not, big seas / little seas, etc. are all factors that seem to induce seasickness in some, while reducing the risk in others.

One other thing I have noticed is that sea sickness can't last more than about 3 days -- after that your body gets tired of being sea sick and with a little good mental attitude the symptoms can be ignored to the point that they go away. I do believe there is a huge element of suggestibility for many people, myself included.
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Old 23-02-2017, 17:52   #64
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

causes iof seasick
anxiety
fear
labyrinthitis
virus
hunger
overfed
among others.
is hard to say what will make it go away as each one of you seasickness sufferers respond differently and have different repairs--like a good anti hangover fix.
with some, wristbands work.
with some dramamine
with some scopolomine
marijuana for some
then there is the identical twin beer and tuna with jalapeno test-the one not eating or drinking was seasick.
ok.
i am so glad i have never been seasick. whew.
must be in the genes or something

y'all remember the book bearing the name "the little green book of seasickness"? came with its own barf bag..
excellent fun read with cures listed.
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Old 23-02-2017, 17:57   #65
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

The electrified wrist bands worked for my buddy. He was miserable so we put a wrist band on him. The intensity is adjustable, so we started out low. He couldn't feel anything, so I turned it up a notch. He still couldn't feel it, so I turned it up again. He got a little angry that he wasn't feeling anything so I turned it to max. He started jumping in time to the once per second jolts. It was too much, but he couldn't stand still long enough for me to turn it down. It probably took 3 minutes before I got it under control, but during that entire time, he completely forgot about his sea sickness. He quickly went back to being sea sick, but he said he preferred that to the cure.
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Old 23-02-2017, 18:09   #66
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

I have never been seasick or airsick. I was the only one in my Air Force Pilot training class to not get sick. It is caused by your brain not agreeing with what your eyes are telling you and the spin from the fluid in your inner ear. Some people like me just cope with it better than others. My wife cannot tolerate the motion without the patch, but once she gets it in her system, she is ok.

Spatial disorientation is the root cause. If you get sick you must do something to ignore the motion like put something below your eyes like a magazine that will not allow you to see the boat and wave movement and will only allow you to see the horizon. The horizon will allow your brain to stabilize with your eyes and coordinate the brain, eyes and spin from the fluid in your inner ear.

Heat, cold, anxiety, fried greasy food, diesel smells - all of these external variables exaggerate it. I feel sorry for people who have it. I will be 70 in a couple of months and am lucky to have been genetically spared this malaise! I have been with people and had them try the technique above and it has helped. Give it a try next time.
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Old 23-02-2017, 18:44   #67
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

I'm with Zee. I think anxiety and fear have a lot to do with it. I think anyone can get sick on any boat at times. Fumes and smells can help set it off. The unconscious nervousness that comes from "Yikes, the floor is moving and I am not sure I am safe" will get the ball rolling, and then once it takes hold, it's hard to shake it without a nice nap out in the cockpit probably. In my own little tender boat I have yet to get sick, I know its motion and I feel comfortable with it AND, importantly, I trust my boat. If you don't really have a feeling for trust of the boat you are on, that doesn't help. Still there may be rough day when I will get queasy on my own boat, it happens.
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Old 23-02-2017, 19:45   #68
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

No Moser, it is that I disagree with you. I do not think seasickness has to do at all with fear of loss of control. I am basing this on over 40 yrs. of sailing, and lifelong experience of motion sickness, plus all the reading up on it I did and theempirical attempts I made to get over it.

Ymmv. You are welcome to your opinion, but the cause, I think you have it incorrect.

Respectfullly,

Ann
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Old 24-02-2017, 02:10   #69
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

This Summer will be 20th season of sailing for me, first 10 were on club boats of various sizes but mostly on 39s. Can't recall the last time I was really seasick, as in talking to Ralph. First time it happened my buddy (who got me into sailing) showed me how helming for a while helped as did ginger ale or anything with ginger. I took anti seascikness medicine only once or twice as it did little to me other than giving me sleepiness and grogginess. After a season or two "Ralph talk" became just simple uncomfort.

One other thing. Once, early in my sailing time, I got really woosy just stepping on a docked 39' boat. I don't remember if there were any reasons for it but this came out of nowhere as I literally just stepped into saloon below while the club owner was trying to fish some wire out of the mast. We were scheduled to leave ASAP but were delayed by this wire fishing. About few hours later we left and I was not seasick even once during that week long cruise. As years and seasons went by I stopped getting really seasick and just am uncomfortable and tired during confused seas. But am fine during just regular swells or one type of motion.

As far as I remember my worst experiences were on 39 footer, a relatively light displacement (light for that time, now of course 13,000lbs for a 39 footer is not so light) O'day/Cal which is US made Jenneau. 2nd worst was O'day 25, also a light displacement boat (about 4,000lbs). On heavier boat (36 footer - 18,000lbs) I seem to handle confused seas much better.
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Old 24-02-2017, 02:24   #70
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ann T. Cate View Post
No Moser, it is that I disagree with you. I do not think seasickness has to do at all with fear of loss of control. I am basing this on over 40 yrs. of sailing, and lifelong experience of motion sickness, plus all the reading up on it I did and theempirical attempts I made to get over it.

Ymmv. You are welcome to your opinion, but the cause, I think you have it incorrect.

Respectfullly,

Ann
I noticed a long time ago that if I am a passenger in a car sometimes I will get somewhat sick from the way the driver drives. While when I am the driver sometimes my passengers will complain that my driving is making them sick. After finding out that helming helped on a boat I think similarly getting behind the wheel of a car would help as well. Don't know if that is related to "loss of control" or not but helming definitely helps with motion sickness.
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Old 24-02-2017, 02:55   #71
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

Sea sickness is just a form of motion sickness caused by the brain's inability to correlate information derived from the inner ear with what is being fed to it by your eyes. I used to suffer terribly from car sickness, seasickness and even air sickness originally and I was a professional airline pilot! soon got over that one once I started my flight training. Sea sickness wise, I often get a mild bout at the beginning of the sailing season until I get my sea legs. I went on a tall ship holiday a few years back on a 4500 ton four masted vessel and was surprised to find I was a little queasy for the first few days despite it being at the end of the sailing season when I was well seasoned to sailing, so in answer to your question, I don't believe size has anything to do with it.
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Old 24-02-2017, 14:50   #72
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

Quote:
One other thing I have noticed is that sea sickness can't last more than about 3 days -- after that your body gets tired of being sea sick and with a little good mental attitude the symptoms can be ignored to the point that they go away.
I was once on a 7000 tonne missile destroyer for sea trials and a colleague was sick during the 5 days that the trials lasted. He couldn't keep any food, so the Navy medic became worried.

He said in his experience 5% of people were never sea sick, 90% were able to overcome the sickness with time and 5% were not and had to give up going to sea. I have been told the case of a young Navy officer, just out of the Naval Academy, who was unfit for sea because of this.

Alain
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Old 25-02-2017, 13:41   #73
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

I realize this is about what causes motion sickness versus remedies, but I am always puzzled by people's rush to medications when there is a natural remedy (Ginger) that has been demonstrated to help many people without the adverse side effects. When tested by MythBusters, it was confirmed to be as affective as the tested medications (which made them loopy). And it was the only non-medication type cure that actually worked. I often get queasy working on the boat while sitting at the marina. Just one Ginger capsule takes care of the problem. Obviously everyone is different, but I think a natural alternative is always worth a first try.
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Old 25-02-2017, 13:52   #74
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

Another natural remedy is parsley. You don't even have to eat it: the smell is powerful enough to cure a mild queasiness.

My niece is very sensitive to transportation sickness and she was relieved by just chewing flat parsley, much less powerful than curly parsley.

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Old 25-02-2017, 14:04   #75
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Re: Seasickness related to boat size or something else…?

Upps what I forgot to say. If you got sick - yes tske the helm - but what we tested with success is: go down to the saloon an immediadely lay down on on of the setties head agsinst bow and keep your eyes closed.

It worked for a lot of people on my cruises and races as a charter skipper.
Do not last long and they are aseep and when theywake up Wahee lock the fridge before it gets empty ;-)
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