Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 25-09-2009, 18:27   #16
CF Adviser
 
Bash's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sausalito
Boat: 14 meter sloop
Posts: 7,260
astral v-eight

It breathes, it weighs almost nothing, the foam is environmentally friendly and you can get one for just over $100US.
Attached Images
 
__________________

__________________
cruising is entirely about showing up--in boat shoes.
Bash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-09-2009, 02:13   #17
Registered User
 
ZodFreak's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sydney, Aus
Boat: I Wish!
Posts: 5
Yeah, but its not type 1
__________________

__________________
ZodFreak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-09-2009, 02:55   #18
Long Range Cruiser
 
MarkJ's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Australian living on "Sea Life" currently in England.
Boat: Beneteau 393 "Sea Life"
Posts: 12,828
Images: 25
We like a bum bag PDF Type 1

Its a fann pack with an extra pocket for MP3 player, torch, sweets etc



We reckon if here is a necessity to put it on (the toys inside!) then we will always wear them on watch
__________________
Notes on a Circumnavigation.
OurLifeAtSea.com

Somalia Pirates and our Convoy
MarkJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2009, 02:37   #19
Registered User
 
bewitched's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 885
Images: 3
For me the important bit is the integrated harness and a good fit as this keeps you on the boat. After that:

Manual Inflatable - (my preferred) does have the issue of accidental firing and I too tuck the bits away to prevent this. It also will not help if you go overboard unconcious.

Automatic Inflatable - Contrary to above posts, in my experience these do go off regularly when they come into contact with a significant amount of water (such as a wave boarding) - it's what they are designed to do.
__________________
bewitched is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2009, 11:06   #20
֍֎֍֎֍֎֍֎֍֎

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 13,056
bewitched, you can also often (depending on how the brand is built) wrap the inflator and cart in saran wrap or aluminum foil, and then velcro down the pocket flap that protects them. This will pretty much prevent anything from wetting the mechanism--except outright submersion.

Or, just break out the TypeI's when you're taking green water on a regular basis.
__________________
hellosailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2009, 11:43   #21
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,369
Comfort is priority one. Otherwise it just takes up room in the closet.
__________________
Cheechako is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2009, 12:42   #22
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,152
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
Yes, the manual pull string on a jacket can foul on something and accidentally inflate the jacket. As sailors we learn that ANYTHING that has strings or dangles on it does not belong on a boat, for just that reason. Scarves, dangly earrings, long hair...I've got nothing against "pretty" but I'd rather not deal with amputations. Enjoy what you wear, just be aware that when you are ON a sailboat you are IN a machine full of moving parts.

So the manual inflation cord on my PFD, like the one on my diving BC, is tucked way up behind the pocket and there's a bit of velcro to make sure the pocket stays flat and the string can't get out unless I'm trying to reach it.

Converting an automatic inflator to manual is easy: Just pull the string, trip it, and deflate it again, leaving the spent cartridge in place to seal the system. You can always seal it or cap it other ways, but that will always work. (I'd put some grease on the needle first, so it does't corrode in case you ever want to use it again.)

Do I trust my automatic to inflate all the time? Hell no. If I'm concious when I go overboard, I can deal with finding a way to float. But if I've been kissed by the boom and go unconcious ?! That unreliable automatic inflation and PFD might, just might, keep me from drowning. to me that's sweetening the odds "enough", because a Type1 is just not going to be worn all the time, and a type3 isn't going to get my face out of the water.

If you work on the water, odds are your employer follows a USCG/OSHA requirement for one of the Type1 vests and you have to wear the damn thing anyhow. For those of us who are allowed a bit more freedom...Might as well enjoy it.
Type 5 work vests like this are legal for job sites near the water. They are also company policy and used all the time on workboats for those working on deck. For inspected vessels, Type 1 life jackets are required to be on board for emergencies. They are not required to be worn on deck when working.

__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2009, 14:46   #23
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Tasmania
Boat: VandeStadt IOR 40' - Insatiable
Posts: 2,317
Images: 91
If I were a rich man (la la la la la la la la la)...

I would buy a Spinlock deckvest.

I am not a rich man, so I have a Burke inflatable harness (yoke style combined pfd & harness).

I prefer a combined pfd / harness because wearing wet-weather gear plus a pfd plus a harness gets bulky and restrictive.

The only downside to the Burke is the rather crappy crotch straps (optional - sold separately), but I plan on designing and making my own, for when conditions merit their use.
__________________
Weyalan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2009, 18:42   #24
Registered User
 
bewitched's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 885
Images: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
bewitched, you can also often (depending on how the brand is built) wrap the inflator and cart in saran wrap or aluminum foil, and then velcro down the pocket flap that protects them. This will pretty much prevent anything from wetting the mechanism--except outright submersion.

Or, just break out the TypeI's when you're taking green water on a regular basis.
I'm coming round to that way of thinking myself - a comfortable, lightweight type one for very day use - something more 'industrial' for heavy weather use.
__________________

__________________
bewitched is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
pfd

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What Makes a Dry Boat? Franco Monohull Sailboats 30 21-06-2009 18:26
What Makes a Sailboat 'Blue Water'? corkscrew Monohull Sailboats 30 21-06-2009 17:15
I need information on a couple makes of boats Little Otter Monohull Sailboats 10 22-11-2008 17:42
What a difference one day makes henryk Off Topic Forum 6 02-01-2008 10:15
The Weather makes the schedule Alan Wheeler The Sailor's Confessional 0 01-09-2007 23:34



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:40.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.