Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 15-04-2007, 16:10   #1
Registered User
 
beau's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Brisbane Australia
Posts: 757
Images: 1
floating anchor rope

I am trying to keep the bow of my trimaran as light as possible.
I have a 45 lb plough anchor and 100ft of 8mm chain.
Most of the time I will try an anchor in less than 30ft of water (i have a 1ft draft Trimaran) with ALL chain.
I also have 200ft of 16mm rope to use for deeper anchorages.

I have noticed that I can purchase floating anchor line, which would keep the anchor rode off the bottom.(can't get fouled)

Any comments please
__________________

__________________
beau is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2007, 16:15   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
rebel heart's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 6,190
Images: 3
Unless I'm crazy, nylon sinks, and polypropelene(sp?) floats. I use a poly line for my dinghy painter because there's less chance it will wrap around stuff under water.

But the load capacity and stretch of the two lines are light years apart. Maybe someone else's input can clear it up, but three strand nylon is pretty much the only thing realistic for an anchor rode.
__________________

__________________
rebel heart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2007, 17:24   #3
Senior Cruiser
 
maxingout's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Fort Pierce, Phoenix
Boat: Privilege 39 Catamaran, Exit Only
Posts: 2,606
When we were anchored in the Tuamotu Archipelago of French Polynesia, we had to float our anchor rode to keep it from wrapping around coral heads. We were inside an atoll called Apataki, and there were coral heads everywhere. The coral heads were deep enough that there was no problem with our keel hitting the coral heads. The problem was that our anchor chain would wrap around the coral heads, damaging the coral, chafing the chain and shortening the chain placing it at risk for breakage in a squall because there was no effective catenary to decrease shock loading on the chain. We didn't want to damage the coral, and we didn't want to risk breaking our chain. What to do?

Simple. We attached inflatable fenders along the length of the chain so that the chain no longer swept the bottom of the anchorage and interacted with the coral. It also created a reverse or upside down catenary, since the chain was being held off the bottom. If a squall came by, the chain would straighten and sink the floats that were holding the chain off the bottom. It actually worked! It was interesting to watch the floats attached to the chain. You could guage how much tension was on the anchor rode by how many of the floats sunk from view during a squall.

When you use this type of system, you need to be careful to maintain a safe scope between your last float and the actual anchor or you will pull the anchor out in a squall. Once again, you have to use your common sense to make the system work safely.

Anyway, you might be able to use a variation of such a system to good effect. If you could do it in a chafe free manner, it would keep your nylon rode off the bottom and decrease the risk of chafe. And there are lots of anchorages in Australia - some behind Fraser Island like Scotty's anchorage - where you wouldn't want to have a rope rode on the bottom because the bottom may be foul.

I personally would not use a floating anchor rode. There's too much traffic and too many props that would run over it and liberate my boat at the most inconvenient of times.

I have only floated my anchor rode one time for a week in Apataki, but it can be done.

Cheers,
__________________
Dave -Sailing Vessel Exit Only

http://SailingUNI.com
http://maxingout.com
http://PositiveThinkingSailor.com
maxingout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2007, 18:34   #4
Marine Service Provider
 
AnchorageGuy's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Wherever the boat is!
Boat: Marine Trader 34DC
Posts: 4,618
Using poly for an anchor line is a bad idea. It deteriorates quickly when exposed to UV and will fail quite suddenly. And it does not have the strength that nylon has.
__________________
Chesapeake Bay, ICW Hampton Roads To Key West, The Gulf Coast, The Bahamas

The Trawler Beach House
Voyages Of Sea Trek
AnchorageGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2007, 19:32   #5
Senior Cruiser
 
delmarrey's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Now in Blaine, WA
Boat: Modified Choate 40
Posts: 10,702
Images: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebel heart
Maybe someone else's input can clear it up, but three strand nylon is pretty much the only thing realistic for an anchor rode.

http://www.yalecordage.com/html/industrial/index.html

See Nylon Brait (Multi-strand)
__________________
delmarrey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2007, 00:45   #6
Marine Service Provider
 
GMac's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: North of the Bridge, thankfully
Boat: R930
Posts: 1,659
I'm with the do not go there team. No to Polyprop as an anchor warp or any serious load application actually. Under big cyclic loads it can heat up and melt, from the inside out.... Spooky. Common cause of boats coming off moorings in a blow, melting at the bow roller.

It would have to be a bloody big bit of PP to lift the chain anyway. Good in theory but not so in practice.
__________________
GMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2007, 01:04   #7
Marine Service Provider
 
craigsmith's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 404
Images: 4
Arrow

Quote:
Originally Posted by beau
I am trying to keep the bow of my trimaran as light as possible.
I have a 45 lb plough anchor and 100ft of 8mm chain.
Most of the time I will try an anchor in less than 30ft of water (i have a 1ft draft Trimaran) with ALL chain.
I also have 200ft of 16mm rope to use for deeper anchorages.

I have noticed that I can purchase floating anchor line, which would keep the anchor rode off the bottom.(can't get fouled)

Any comments please
Replace your plough with a decent type that could be half the weight for the same or better performance.

I don't think the floating rode is a good idea. Under the remotest strain it will be pulled straight anyway, so it's pointless, and will just present an obstacle for your own boat, and others, when it is floating at the surface. The only way to adequately deal with the problem of fouling is to carry more chain. You could lower the size a bit and up the grade. Hopefully your low draft will allow you to avoid the 300' or so that is common on serious cruising boats.

Rebel Heart is wrong, 3-strand nylon is anything but ideal for anchor rodes, you should ideally be using multi-plait polyester (not to be confused with polyprop), or nylon for short lengths (but be aware of the disadvantages).
__________________

__________________
Craig Smith
info on anchors & anchoring | Peter & Kiwi Roaís website
craigsmith is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
anchor

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Yacht Moquini disaster DeepFrz Cruising News & Events 20 06-04-2011 15:45
PDQ 36 Floating aroud the Atlantic Ocean ginosailling Multihull Sailboats 16 08-10-2007 20:19
Miami Boat Show - Floating Condominums maxingout Multihull Sailboats 17 23-02-2007 01:56



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 15:35.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.