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Old 22-10-2011, 06:36   #31
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Re: Towing Dinghy

Normally, the first choice for storage is on the foredeck, upside down. Sometimes you have to deflate a RIB to get it to fit there on smaller boats.

- - Second choice - or first choice for those boats with them - is on davits off the stern. But even storage on davits can be dangerous if out in the middle of the ocean in big breaking seas. I have seen circumnavigators heading out for an ocean crossing put their dinghy on the foredeck.

- - Next there are tilting mechanisms that can be attached to the stern/transom and the dinghy rotated to a vertical storage position. Some do it by grabbing the side tubes/walls of the dinghy and then rotate it vertical so that the dinghy bow/stern are horizontal and the other dinghy side tube/wall is parallel to the ship's aft deck.

- - Another stern "tilting" system grabs the dinghy transom and the dinghy's bow is vertical up above the ship's aft deck/stern.

- - Normally, folks buy their sail/power boat first and then shop for a dinghy that fits their boat considering transom width and/or foredeck area. I see some cruisers who keep wanting bigger and bigger dinghies until the dinghy size equals the boat LOA. If you are going to do that just buy a catamaran as they are "two boats" connected together already.
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Old 22-10-2011, 07:06   #32
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Re: Towing Dinghy

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Originally Posted by coyfish9906 View Post
Not to hi jack the thread but this one gave me a question to ask, im on an Ericson 36' and I have an old fiberglass sailing dink with no mast but my question is if I shouldn't tow it where is the best place to keep her when im under way? Im very new to sailing so be gentle ...lol
My first preference for on-deck storage would be just behind the mast. If your boat is long enough to permit that it gets the dinghy out of the way. With smaller boats you pretty much have to carry in on the foredeck, where it is more in the way.

One advantage to carrying the dinghy on the foredeck: When you are anchored you can hoist the bow up so the dinghy becomes a fantastic wind scoop.

Fabbian
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Old 22-10-2011, 15:03   #33
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Thank u for the advice. I got the dink out of desperation cause the vessel im on is on a mooring and I needed somethin to get to and fro, my first boat so there is a ton of stuff to learn. I guess since im not going to be doing any passages soon ill tie her to the ball till I get some better sea time under my belt
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Old 27-10-2011, 13:16   #34
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Re: Towing Dinghy

I lost mine in a Nor' Easter 2 weeks ago sailing South from Beaufort, NC to Fernandina, FL. Had a breaking sea come up from behind a crashed on the dingy (filled the cock pit as well) and it disappeared. It was 2 am and my attempt to find it was half-hearted and quite futile. I will now keep the replacement on deck.

Cheers!
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Old 27-10-2011, 13:24   #35
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Re: Towing Dinghy

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I've wondered why more people don't pull their dinghies up closer. Wouldn't do it with a RIB, like you have, but any reason not to pull a fully-inflatable right up so that its bow is up out of the water against the boat's transom? I would think this would work especially well with a reverse transom.

Does anyone tow their inflatable dinghy this way?
I do...........
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Old 19-11-2011, 11:15   #36
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Re: Towing Dinghy

Coyfish,

General consensus is that you should get the dink on deck in any kind of a seaway. Depending on the size of your dink, you will have to put it on the foredeck or perhaps cabintop.

With almost any size dink, it helps to use a spinnaker halyard to raise the boat with a winch, having someone else guide the dink as it comes aboard. It needs to be lashed SECURELY upside down. You will be amazed at the force of broken water, much less a green wave.

Take everything out of it before you hoist in on board. An outboard of any size also benefits from using tackle, and the end of the boom is often helpful in rigging a crane to get it to its storage bracket.

If you are going to tow in protected waters: The right place to tow the dingy is on the downslope of the second wave. Then it has the least drag and won't hit the transom. Tending the painter is REQUIRED to keep from fouling the prop with the painter when backing or maneuvering under power. A floating line also helps. Pros recommend that you attach the towline to the dinghy with a harness and to a point at or near the waterline.

Be wary of chafe when towing. Lock your dink and motor! Dinghies are expensive!
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Old 06-09-2013, 11:15   #37
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Re: Towing Dinghy

I have 2 dinghies, A Caribe RIB (9) and an Achilles(8.6 with inflatable keel). The Caribe is stronger et more confident in waves. Bu I wonder if someone had ever find what the actual drag for each type of dinghy(Rib and soft floor). I presume by attaching the painter to some fish weight scale. Any one ?...
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Old 06-09-2013, 12:11   #38
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Re: Towing Dinghy

A couple of years ago, I got a call from our local towing/salvage boat guy. He had been hired to locate and recover an RIB that had been lost while towing somewhere in the Straits of Juan do Fuca the evening before.

The towing/salvage guy hired me to fly over the area to locate the dingy. Found it after about a half an hour in the air. Stayed on station till their speedy boat got to it.

Dingy was upright and not swamped. I assume the painter or cleats had parted without the crew noticing.

In the end it all worked out fine. Especially for the towing/salvage guy and myself.

Steve
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Old 13-11-2013, 19:17   #39
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Re:best Dinghy?

When I bought my sailboat 3 years ago it came with a 10' Caribe RIB and an 18hp outboard motor. It has been fine for putting around the San Juan Islands but I am getting ready to head out and it seems like too much dingy and motor for offshore cruising. You could probably water ski behind it if you wanted to.
I was thinking of getting a wood or fiberglass sailing dinghy as it would be easier to get out of the water (lighter) and a lot of fun while anchored but not sure what size hull and motor to get. Would like to hear from people who have, or have had a sailing dinghy in the past that did extensive cruising with it.

Rick
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Old 13-11-2013, 19:52   #40
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Re: Towing Dinghy

I've owned a 9' "Conny" fiberglass sailing/rowing dinghy for almost 30 years now (a fiberglass replica of the tenders that came with the classic Consolidated Express motor cruisers of the '20s). It has really classic lines and it sails and rows like a dream, especially with 6-1/2' Shaw and Tenney oars. However, its weight capacity is limited (3 average-size adults is all it will handle. It has a round bottom and is pretty "tippy" if you don't know the proper way to get into and out of it. I used to put a 4-horse outboard on it occasionally, and that was too much motor for the boat; it got really squirrelly when it tried to get up on a plane at a little over half throttle.

Even though it tows nicely, I wouldn't be inclined to tow a dinghy offshore. I used to carry the Conny on davits back when I had my 45' cutter.
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Old 13-11-2013, 20:31   #41
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Re: Towing Dinghy

I finaly have bought a dinghy davits made by Plastimo. Very simple sturdy and easy to live with. But mostly so simple and discreet: two 2 inches bent stainless steel tubing that can be removed and stored in couple of minutes. Where I sail(Upstate New York and Vermont), an epidemic of big rigs attached to the transom with all sorts of attachments make boats sometime look like drilling platform...
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Old 13-11-2013, 21:02   #42
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Originally Posted by dive View Post
When I bought my sailboat 3 years ago it came with a 10' Caribe RIB and an 18hp outboard motor. It has been fine for putting around the San Juan Islands but I am getting ready to head out and it seems like too much dingy and motor for offshore cruising. You could probably water ski behind it if you wanted to. I was thinking of getting a wood or fiberglass sailing dinghy as it would be easier to get out of the water (lighter) and a lot of fun while anchored but not sure what size hull and motor to get. Would like to hear from people who have, or have had a sailing dinghy in the past that did extensive cruising with it. Rick
We first cruised with an 8hp on our 9.5 AB RIB. It was not enough to plane with our 2 young kids. So we upgraded to a 15 hp for the second cruise, when kids were 8 and 11. Also brought a sailing dinghy for them, and even called it "Independence". Carried the sailing dinghy on the foredeck when offshore and the RIB in the davits. The kids hardly used the sailing dink, but we used the heck out of the planing RIB. Still do. Finally sold the sailing dink in Luperon. Mid you want to be able to get out and about on your dink, have one that goes fast. It opens up he big wide world around the anchorage.
Now the boys are 14 and 17 and bigger (er, taller) than me. Still love the planing RIB, but now we need a 12 ft RIB and a 20 hp. Or, send one off to uni next year.
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Old 14-11-2013, 07:46   #43
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Re: Towing Dinghy

Other than short hops in settled weather a towed dingy will become a liability sooner or later,probably sooner.
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Old 30-11-2013, 18:20   #44
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Re: Towing Dinghy

As i read thru all of this I concur that if all possibile store it on the deck (either inflated or de-flated...now for my situation..first of all I will stay in the ICW for the forseable futher and I am a single handed sailor which bring me to a very important item...with limited manpower ( me) how does one man handle the motor from the storage block to the dingy and back to the block with finished.
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Old 30-11-2013, 18:28   #45
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Re: Towing Dinghy

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Originally Posted by Hank Kivett View Post
As i read thru all of this I concur that if all possibile store it on the deck (either inflated or de-flated...now for my situation..first of all I will stay in the ICW for the forseable futher and I am a single handed sailor which bring me to a very important item...with limited manpower ( me) how does one man handle the motor from the storage block to the dingy and back to the block with finished.
With a jerry rigged crane. There are several folks here that have them and they work well. I've been aboard Joli Elle and CelestialSailor's rig works very well.

kind regards,
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