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Old 12-08-2010, 06:22   #1
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The Kitchen Sink . . .

This might be a stupid question but most boats I see have a very small drain in the kitchen sink. My H28 has the same problem and it takes forever to drain the sink. I was thinking to put a bigger drainpipe to a bigger skin fitting and make it all flow better. Is there a reason why I shouldn't do that?
The other option I can think of is a small waste tank of lets say 10 litters to drain the sink quicker and from there drains slowly the old way trough the smaller fitting.
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Old 12-08-2010, 06:43   #2
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Have you tried blowing the drain out first? Many galley sinks drain slowly due to clogs. I would not go to the extent of replacing a through hull just to drain the sink faster.
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Old 12-08-2010, 06:50   #3
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Bigger thru hull also lets water in a lot faster if there is a break in the line !
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Old 12-08-2010, 07:17   #4
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Depending upon how often you use your sink, you may have some "growies" near your thru-hull. They are filter feeders and the down-flow from the sink provides nutrients that make them very happy. Moreover, if you have allowed any grease or cooking oils to wash down the drain, it tends to solidify on the inside of the hose, restricting flow.

One way to clean the growies from the drain is to simply disconnect it from the bottom of the sink and run a plumber's snake through it. Before doing so, however, try filling the sink with boiling hot water mixed with vinegar and draining it a few times, at least until the hose connection at the thru-hull feels warm to the touch. Then dump in a jug of CLR and let it sit overnight. A lot of it will drain through but a good bit will remain in the drain hose, doing its thing desolving much of the growies, if there are any. The next morning add another tea kettle or two of boiling water to "flush" the CLR residue. Thre "coup de grace" is to take a compressed gas horn, press the horn over the drain and give the thing a good blast.

I have used the foregoing method on our drains quite a few times over the years and have had very good results.

FWIW...
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Old 12-08-2010, 07:43   #5
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I just put a hose to it. Good pressure and a rag around the nozzle to make sure it squirts right in. I have double sinks so I have to plug the other one up first so that the water doesn't squirt back up through the that sink.
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Old 12-08-2010, 08:33   #6
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we've got a full 1 1/2" sink drain, although it allows the the sink to dump water quickly it also allows the water to follow the waves outside the boat when on stbd tack. Water in and out and in and out and in and out.......mesmerizing sometimes.
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Old 12-08-2010, 10:05   #7
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Originally Posted by svHyLyte View Post
... Thre "coup de grace" is to take a compressed gas horn, press the horn over the drain and give the thing a good blast.
I have used the foregoing method on our drains quite a few times over the years and have had very good results.
FWIW...
Great idea. Even old dawgs can learn new tricks, if they watch/liten to the right folks.
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Old 12-08-2010, 10:19   #8
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Great idea. Even old dawgs can learn new tricks, if they watch/liten to the right folks.
Yeah! as long as you don't blow your fittings apart.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasco
Have you tried blowing the drain out first? Many galley sinks drain slowly due to clogs. I would not go to the extent of replacing a through hull just to drain the sink faster.
I went to a larger thruhull, and what a difference it made. It's now 1-1/2", which is a standard size for the marine (yacht) sink couplings. As for the water coming back in, that's what seacocks are for.

What I don't like is; I have a deep double sink and neither one of them is large enough to turn a dish around in for rinsing. And I can't find a single sink that'll fit in the same hole.
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Old 12-08-2010, 10:24   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reiner View Post
This might be a stupid question but most boats I see have a very small drain in the kitchen sink. My H28 has the same problem and it takes forever to drain the sink. I was thinking to put a bigger drainpipe to a bigger skin fitting and make it all flow better. Is there a reason why I shouldn't do that?
The other option I can think of is a small waste tank of lets say 10 litters to drain the sink quicker and from there drains slowly the old way trough the smaller fitting.
Thanks
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Is it a single or double bowl sink? If single maybe it just needs a vent line.
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Old 12-08-2010, 11:47   #10
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I'm with Don on this...a vent line will do wonders.
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Old 12-08-2010, 12:03   #11
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I'm with Don on this...a vent line will do wonders.
That would depend on the length and angle of the entire drain and it's ability to create an air pocket.
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Old 12-08-2010, 12:32   #12
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The height of the sink above the water line may be a factor in how fast your sink drains.
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Old 15-08-2010, 06:55   #13
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Beside the food stuff going down the kitchen drain there is a lot of oil and grease from cooking pans/pots. etc. All of this coats the insides of the hoses and eventually assists in restricting the water flow. Living on a cruising boat you have to be very attentive to what goes down the drains. The old "out of sight, out of mind" doesn't work when you are the "plumber" that has to disassemble and clean the drains.
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Old 15-08-2010, 07:24   #14
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Thre "coup de grace" is to take a compressed gas horn, press the horn over the drain and give the thing a good blast.

That's interesting in that it would not be much volume of air. Everytime the topic of double use items comes up, I forget to mention this one.

My wife manages to plug the sink every now and again. I simply moved the hose on my wet/dry vac to the blow position and would blow the plug out. Then I would guickly go outside to watch the little fish feeding on the gunge that came out.
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Old 28-09-2010, 03:13   #15
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Plumbers' Plunger...

As the drainage in Boracay's sink was slowing I brought a cheap yellow plastic plunger from my local hardware store and gave a couple of good sucks...

It took a little practice, but by having the right level of water I can now suck all the revolting "gunk" I like back up into the sink.

Caveat: Only do this when your significant other is not watching.

P.S. I now keep a plunger close to the sink. I'm the one who has to install any bigger thru hull.
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