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Old 18-08-2008, 10:43   #1
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How Does this Engine Shut Down?

OK I'll admit I don't have a lot of experience, but...

I belong to a sailing club so tend to get a different boat each week and even if they are the same model they aren't normally setup the same. Yesterday my wife and I were on a Pearson 34 for the days sail. We did the noraml of going over the boat and learned which lines were what etc. Started the engine and motored out of the Boston inner harbour, raised the sails and then it happened... where the heck and how does this engine get turned off? Looked around, tried the key, throttled it down all the way, couldn't find a fuel shutoff. Said to ourselves; Hey there is the orginal owners manual in the nav desk. Took a look at the manual (looked like something done on a type writer that is how old this boat was). It seemed to say to pull the throttle down aganist a spring stop, tried it didn't work. Was about to call into the club and ask as we had gotten to the point that it didn't matter how stupid we sounded, when coimg back out the cabin into the cockpit there it was; hidden up under the helmsman seat the fuel stop. Couldn't see it from any of the angles we had while in the cockpit. So we saved ourselves from broadcasting how dumb we were, but it was worth a laugh between us. Now there is a new item added to our pre-sail check list.
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Old 18-08-2008, 10:58   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Lucas View Post
tried the key,
You might want to suggest to someone at the club that they check the alternator on that boat. Sometimes turning the key off while the engine is running can fry the diodes.

It's amazing how they try to hide those shutoffs on some boats!
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Old 18-08-2008, 13:03   #3
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If this is the dumbest thing I even experience I'm golden!
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Old 24-08-2008, 18:56   #4
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Before I start any diesel on a customers boat....I always look for the shutoff.

I have found'em everywhere......Cockpit lockers...in the cabin.....Propane Lockers....in side storage pockets....whew!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 24-08-2008, 21:37   #5
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You might want to suggest to someone at the club that they check the alternator on that boat. Sometimes turning the key off while the engine is running can fry the diodes.

It's amazing how they try to hide those shutoffs on some boats!
Not a very likely consequence. Shutting off the "ignition" switch turns off the field voltage to the alternator, basically turning it off.

What you are thinking of is what happens when you disconnect the OUTPUT of the alternator from the battery and the output voltage rises to the diode failure point.
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Old 25-08-2008, 03:22   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Lucas
... there it was; hidden up under the helmsman seat the fuel stop. Couldn't see it from any of the angles we had while in the cockpit. So we saved ourselves from broadcasting how dumb we were, but it was worth a laugh between us. Now there is a new item added to our pre-sail check list.
A good lesson, well learned, and well told.
Check lists work, especially (but not only) when dealing with unfamiliar equipment.
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Old 25-08-2008, 06:12   #7
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Also, in a pinch, you can always block the air intake. Obviously not a substitute for the fuel shutoff, but those cables have been known to break.

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Old 19-01-2009, 11:54   #8
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What timing!

Ha, ha, ha!... I say it with tears in my eyes. At least you saved yourself from the embarrassment I had to endure this weekend.

I just bought a 1940's Monterey wood boat with a detroit diesel engine. And took it out for my first spin this weekend, so I decided to take it easy and just motor out to the fuel dock. I got there, and two service men helped me dock, and then had to stand by, patiently looking while I fumbled around trying to find a way to turn the engine off.

They were Waiting.. and waiting.. and looking.. I was so embarrased and red faced. I apologized profusely and left the dock again, went into the bay to a secluded spot, put the engine in neutral and looked and looked around the cabin.

One button just turned on a warning red light (I still need to figure that one out), pushing the start motor again just engaged the starter gear with a horrible grind, the throttle lever did nothing (other than over revving the engine when pushed). I even thought about opening the battery power breaker (I'm glad I didnt, I was told later that it would damage the alternator). There I was, livid, thinking about running out of fuel and being adrift, so I called the prior owner on the cell phone and left another embarrasing message (help! help! I'm motoring on the bay and I cant shut the engine off!) rummaging in the engine compartment (with the engine running ) I remembered about a string I had to pull to shut the engine off.

The only way to turn the engine off in this boat is from the engine compartment (I'll have to fix that).

So I feel your pain and... ha, ha, ha... very funny
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Old 19-01-2009, 13:30   #9
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I was surprised to see a new posting to this old "dumb a.." posting of mine. Nice to see I'm not alone and willing to admit such a thing. One thing you can say for ever having gone though this is that you make sure it doesn't happen again. Last year after I posted this orginal I was on a different club boat where the engine stop was hidden inside a cockpit locker up under the edge. It was a nice location to be out of the way (couldn't see it even when you opened the locker), but took me 1/2 hour to find it before I tossed off the mooring line.
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Old 19-01-2009, 13:49   #10
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Red face

We pulled into Cuba one time and the engine wouldn't shut off. I was new to diesel engines (and this boat) and so wasn't sure where to start except to start tracing wires back from the cutoff button. After customs and immigration left I opened the engine box and saw a solenoid on the top of the Perkins. Manually engaged that and the engine stopped. The wire from the grnd. side of the solenoid to the ground terminal on the engine was solid core household electrical wire, all coiled up like a pigs tail, and of course it was broken...arghhh.

Those of you who have seen my posts about not using solid core electrical wire might now know where I am coming from and why. Oh yes, same voyage as the clogged fuel line.
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Old 17-02-2009, 20:45   #11
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I sure hope you used the stop on the governor

and not the emergency stop on the blower.......

that is an emegency stop it is not designed for normal engine shutdown as it creates a tremendous vacuum on the blowere and cause seals to fail

Quote:
Originally Posted by andrejsv View Post
Ha, ha, ha!... I say it with tears in my eyes. At least you saved yourself from the embarrassment I had to endure this weekend.

I just bought a 1940's Monterey wood boat with a detroit diesel engine. And took it out for my first spin this weekend, so I decided to take it easy and just motor out to the fuel dock. I got there, and two service men helped me dock, and then had to stand by, patiently looking while I fumbled around trying to find a way to turn the engine off.

They were Waiting.. and waiting.. and looking.. I was so embarrased and red faced. I apologized profusely and left the dock again, went into the bay to a secluded spot, put the engine in neutral and looked and looked around the cabin.

One button just turned on a warning red light (I still need to figure that one out), pushing the start motor again just engaged the starter gear with a horrible grind, the throttle lever did nothing (other than over revving the engine when pushed). I even thought about opening the battery power breaker (I'm glad I didnt, I was told later that it would damage the alternator). There I was, livid, thinking about running out of fuel and being adrift, so I called the prior owner on the cell phone and left another embarrasing message (help! help! I'm motoring on the bay and I cant shut the engine off!) rummaging in the engine compartment (with the engine running ) I remembered about a string I had to pull to shut the engine off.

The only way to turn the engine off in this boat is from the engine compartment (I'll have to fix that).

So I feel your pain and... ha, ha, ha... very funny
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