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Old 05-04-2016, 07:03   #136
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

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Originally Posted by Lizzy Belle View Post
Use a Coleman Camp oven, or an Omnia stove top oven. I had an Omnia on another boat, and a Coleman on this one. Both work like a charm.

I've never had a "real" oven so not sure how much LPG / alcohol those use.
A "real" oven will use less gas than a stovetop one -- as less heat is lost.

But still an awful lot if you bake much. I had someone on board last year who baked regularly, and the gas was gone in no time . . .
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Old 05-04-2016, 07:14   #137
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

I buy alcohol by the liter bottle at the supermarket.
Lasts me about ... 1,5 weeks, I guess, including baking (brownies and bread at least in the weekends).

I'll try and keep track of my alcohol usage for a bit; since I always have a couple of bottles I haven't paid too much attention.
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Old 05-04-2016, 08:11   #138
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

OK, here's my basic yeast bread receipt. It really is very simple to do. Yes, it takes a bit of time, but as a cruiser time is what I am rich in.

Basic bread:
  1. Put warm water into a mixing bowl. Add table spoon or two of sugar (or honey). Toss in some yeast or sourdough. Wait until it froths up.
  2. Throw in some salt (~tea spoon/cup water) and some oil (~table spoon/cup of water).
  3. Toss in enough flour so you can stir vigourously without it splashing all over the place: consistency of runny ketchup or BBQ sauce.
  4. Beat the hell out of it with a wooden spoon for a few minutes -- until the batter takes on a slight sheen
  5. Toss in more flour until you can kneed it without it being too sticky.
  6. Work out all your frustrations by punching and kneading away. Knead until it starts to stick to your hand.
  7. Put a warm towel over the bowl and leave it in a warm place. Let it rise till it's ~tripled in size (depends on type of flour used).
  8. (OPTIONAL) Punch it down and kneed it a few more times over the intervening hours.
  9. Place dough in pans, bake at ~175C - 200C (350-400F) and cook until it pops out of pan and sounds a bit hollow when you knock on the bottom of the loaf.
  10. You can augment this basic approach with lots of additions. I like putting hearty grains into the batter (bran, cornmeal, flax), or I spice it up with savoury spices. Add some eggs to make it more moist, or spray and coat the cooking bread to produce a thicker, chewier crust. You can use the same approach to make buns, or add more oil to make pizza dough.
The best thing about bread is that it is hard to fail completely. Even a bad loaf is still pretty good.

Interesting point about use of propane. Our over in quite small, and quite new. It doesn't take much time to heat up. But yes, using it more means running out of propane faster. But that's what propane is for. To me, cooking and preparing good, yummy food, is a key part of happy cruising.
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Old 05-04-2016, 08:19   #139
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

Dock,
Have you considered one bigger tank, that you use to fill your smaller ones, or is it possible to get adapters?
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Old 05-04-2016, 08:56   #140
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

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Originally Posted by Lizzy Belle View Post
Well, this is embarassing ... I'm Dutch, but I've never heard of "egg bread" (which would translate to something like 'eier brood').

I do know brioche, which is a French bread (and readily available here too): Could this be the bread you're looking for?

Brioche is a very rich bread, with lots of egg and butter, and I know it's sometimes called egg bread or butter bread here because of that. But it's not a Dutch bread, nor an egg bread It is a fairly sweet and soft - even 'fluffy' bread / pastry.

I wish I knew. My dad's family had a variety of Dutch dishes he asks me to look for. Egg bread tops the list followed by a nasty sounding potato and cabbage dish. He said egg bread is heavy. No one is left to ask but my dad sadly so I figured why not ask a well traveled international group. He's not well so I keep looking. You'd laugh at the recipes I've looked at through google translate.
Thanks!


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Old 05-04-2016, 09:00   #141
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

Can you describe what the egg bread looks like? It may be what the Dutch call "eierkoek" which is a round, little flat kind of bread much like bananabread in consistency.
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Old 05-04-2016, 10:23   #142
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

I've made bread this way, many times, and it's always been easy and wonderful:

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Old 05-04-2016, 10:56   #143
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

I have been baking no kneed bread for years. One can Google "no kneed bread" and get a gazilion results. This is as good as any to explanation as any, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No-knead_bread

The dough is made wetter and allowed to sit for at least 8-12 hours to allow time to kneed the bread. All you do is mix the ingredients and let the dough sit for hours. That is real hard. Then bake in an oven. I have had the best results when using a cast iron dutch oven. The lid holds in the moisture to help develop the crust.

Once the bread is around 200-220ishF it is done.

I like to make whole grain breads. Nothing but flour, salt, water, yeast and maybe a bit of sugar or olive oil. If I try to make a Cuban bread, lard is used. It really ain't rocket science. Anyway, a single slice of whole grain bread with a bowl of soup fills me up.

Try out the various recipes. The worst that can happen is you spent maybe 1 USD on materials and have to feed the birds, ducks, etc. I have yet had a bread that I did not eat. The loaf may not have been what I wanted but it sure was better than Wonder Bread.

Later,
Dan
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Old 05-04-2016, 12:13   #144
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

I have actually tried that and it is absolutely horrible. If dying from hunger, I would rather eat my shoes.

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I have been baking no kneed bread for years. One can Google "no kneed bread" and get a gazilion results. This is as good as any to explanation as any, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No-knead_bread

The dough is made wetter and allowed to sit for at least 8-12 hours to allow time to kneed the bread. All you do is mix the ingredients and let the dough sit for hours. That is real hard. Then bake in an oven. I have had the best results when using a cast iron dutch oven. The lid holds in the moisture to help develop the crust.

Once the bread is around 200-220ishF it is done.

I like to make whole grain breads. Nothing but flour, salt, water, yeast and maybe a bit of sugar or olive oil. If I try to make a Cuban bread, lard is used. It really ain't rocket science. Anyway, a single slice of whole grain bread with a bowl of soup fills me up.

Try out the various recipes. The worst that can happen is you spent maybe 1 USD on materials and have to feed the birds, ducks, etc. I have yet had a bread that I did not eat. The loaf may not have been what I wanted but it sure was better than Wonder Bread.

Later,
Dan
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Old 05-04-2016, 12:37   #145
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

My wife makes the "24 hour" bread, pretty much the same as "no knead" bread and it always turns out well. Personally I like making naan bread
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/14565/naan
It's easy to prep, and cooks in a couple minutes on the BBQ. Best part is it tastes great.
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Old 05-04-2016, 13:19   #146
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

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I have actually tried that and it is absolutely horrible. If dying from hunger, I would rather eat my shoes.
I don't know how the baker screwed it up then. I have used a couple of different recipes and just winged it by making the dough wetter than specified and it has worked just fine. This is NOT rocket science.

No Kneed bread is a technique or maybe a recipe tweek. Just take a bread recipe, make it a bit wetter, let it sit for hours then bake. Pretty easy. If the bread tasted like shoe leather that is on the baker, not the technique.

A bread machine is just another wasted uni tasker in the kitchen/galley.

Later,
Dan
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Old 05-04-2016, 13:22   #147
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

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Dock,
Have you considered one bigger tank, that you use to fill your smaller ones, or is it possible to get adapters?
You cannot easily or safely fill smaller LPG tanks from larger ones. The gas is liquid and so you can't tell whether you've overfilled it from pressure. If you make a mistake, you can have a BLEVE, a dangerous phenomenon.
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Old 05-04-2016, 13:34   #148
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

I don't know what a BLEVE is, but I have filled a many a fork lift tank from a bulk tank, forklift tank had a bleed valve on it, you opened it when filling from the bulk tank to relive pressure, and when liquid came out, you closed the valve as the tank was full.
I'm sure valve had a dip tube and tank wan't full, but had gas space above the liquid.

That was my first real job back in the late 70's, fork lift driver
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Old 05-04-2016, 14:35   #149
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

here is one from bread maker expert:

excellent bread can be made from excellent ingredients only.

flower that anglo world produces is substandard that's why such a difference.

if one tries hard, can find proper flower in anglo world but will be expensive.
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Old 05-04-2016, 14:53   #150
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Re: Bread Maker Aboard ?

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You cannot easily or safely fill smaller LPG tanks from larger ones. The gas is liquid and so you can't tell whether you've overfilled it from pressure. If you make a mistake, you can have a BLEVE, a dangerous phenomenon.

ummm.. that's exactly what they do at gas bottle filling stations, fill a small tank from a bigger one.

And you can't overpressure the tanks, because the pressure that drives the transfer is the vapour pressure of the propane, which is what the tank is built for.

The way it works is, that the bigger tank has a dip leg which goes to the bottom of the tank. So liquid propane comes out of it. The smaller tank is vented to "make room" for the liquid. (This is the dangerous bit, because you're venting propane gas.)

When the small tank is full it starts venting liquid, you shut the vent then shut all the other valves.
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