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Old 27-11-2015, 06:40   #46
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

Quote:
Originally Posted by belizesailor View Post
Those numbers mean that most of the waves are about 2.3 meters high (though you will likely get occasional bigger ones), coming from the East, with a period (time between waves) of 6 seconds. When wave height and period are similar (~7' and ~6 seconds) then you get steep faced waves close together which makes for a very unpleasant ride. Unfortunately, these short, steep seas are a common pattern in the GOM.

Just count off every 6 seconds and imagine a 7' wave hammering you every 6 seconds...for 3 days!

Expressions: short & steep, sloppy...others may have more...
If those conditions are not rare in the Gulf, it should make for some fun writing! Thanks!
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Old 27-11-2015, 07:00   #47
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

Use Fathoms for depth
Knots for speed of boat
For wind use: The Beaufort scaleBeaufort wind force scale

, which is used in Met Office marine forecasts, is an empirical measure for describing wind intensity based on observed sea conditions.
Specifications and equivalent speedsBeaufort wind scaleMean Wind Speed
Limits of wind speed

Wind descriptive terms
Probable wave height in metres*
Probable maximum wave height in metres*
SeastateSea descriptive terms
Knotsms-1Knotsms-1




0
0
0
<1
<1
Calm
-
-
0
Calm (glassy)
1
2
1
1-3
1-2
Light air
0.1
0.1
1
Calm (rippled)
2
5
3
4-6
2-3
Light breeze
0.2
0.3
2
Smooth (wavelets)
3
9
5
7-10
4-5
Gentle breeze
0.6
1.0
3
Slight
4
13
7
11-16
6-8
Moderate breeze
1.0
1.5
3-4
Slight - Moderate
5
19
10
17-21
9-11
Fresh breeze
2.0
2.5
4
Moderate
6
24
12
22-27
11-14
Strong breeze
3.0
4.0
5
Rough
7
30
15
28-33
14-17
Near gale
4.0
5.5
5-6
Rough-Very rough
8
37
19
34-40
17-21
Gale
5.5
7.5
6-7
Very rough - High
9
44
23
41-47
21-24
Strong gale*
7.0
10.0
7
High
10
52
27
48-55
25-28
Storm
9.0
12.5
8
Very High
11
60
31
56-63
29-32
Violent storm
11.5
16.0
8
Very High
12
-

64+
33+
Hurricane
14+
-
9
Phenomenal
*
  1. These values refer to well-developed wind waves of the open sea.
  2. The lag effect between the wind getting up and the sea increasing should be borne in mind.
  3. The official term is Strong gale, however, the Met Office uses the descriptive term Severe gale
To convert knots to mph multiply by 1.15, for m/s multiply by 0.514.
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Old 27-11-2015, 07:28   #48
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

Quote:
Originally Posted by anacapaisland42 View Post
Use Fathoms for depth
Knots for speed of boat
For wind use: The Beaufort scaleBeaufort wind force scale

, which is used in Met Office marine forecasts, is an empirical measure for describing wind intensity based on observed sea conditions.
Specifications and equivalent speedsBeaufort wind scaleMean Wind Speed
Limits of wind speed

Wind descriptive terms
Probable wave height in metres*
Probable maximum wave height in metres*
SeastateSea descriptive terms
Knotsms-1Knotsms-1




0
0
0
<1
<1
Calm
-
-
0
Calm (glassy)
1
2
1
1-3
1-2
Light air
0.1
0.1
1
Calm (rippled)
2
5
3
4-6
2-3
Light breeze
0.2
0.3
2
Smooth (wavelets)
3
9
5
7-10
4-5
Gentle breeze
0.6
1.0
3
Slight
4
13
7
11-16
6-8
Moderate breeze
1.0
1.5
3-4
Slight - Moderate
5
19
10
17-21
9-11
Fresh breeze
2.0
2.5
4
Moderate
6
24
12
22-27
11-14
Strong breeze
3.0
4.0
5
Rough
7
30
15
28-33
14-17
Near gale
4.0
5.5
5-6
Rough-Very rough
8
37
19
34-40
17-21
Gale
5.5
7.5
6-7
Very rough - High
9
44
23
41-47
21-24
Strong gale*
7.0
10.0
7
High
10
52
27
48-55
25-28
Storm
9.0
12.5
8
Very High
11
60
31
56-63
29-32
Violent storm
11.5
16.0
8
Very High
12
-

64+
33+
Hurricane
14+
-
9
Phenomenal
*
  1. These values refer to well-developed wind waves of the open sea.
  2. The lag effect between the wind getting up and the sea increasing should be borne in mind.
  3. The official term is Strong gale, however, the Met Office uses the descriptive term Severe gale
To convert knots to mph multiply by 1.15, for m/s multiply by 0.514.
Oh, wow, thank you for all that. Can't wait to use bits of it in the narrative--definitely gotta include some strong gales!
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Old 28-11-2015, 10:19   #49
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

For another piece of marine trivia look up "green flash"

What is the 'Green Flash'?
by Peter Michaud


Gemini Observatory Information Manager
Lots of people talk about it, but how many have actually seen the much-coveted green flash? If you haven't seen or heard of the green flash, it's simply a fleeting spot of intense green light on the horizon an instant after sunset or immediately before sunrise. Since Hawai‘i is one of the best places to see this phenomenon, let's explore why the green flash happens and how to improve your chances of glimpsing it safely.
First of all, when trying to spot the Green Flash don't be fooled by what I call, "The Fool's Flash". This is simply the greenish after-image burned into your retina by looking directly at the setting sun. (If you're lucky, this condition will only be temporary.) Remember, even when it's rising or setting it's still dangerous to look directly at the sun's disk. While awaiting the green flash at sunset, look away until only the very top of the sun's disk is about to disappear below the horizon - it's only during this last instant that the green flash will be visible anyway.
Secondly, the green flash is best seen when the sun sets or rises over the ocean and only when it is absolutely clear all the way to the horizon. While this might seem common in Hawai‘i, distant clouds often linger on the horizon, making the green flash much less frequent than one might imagine.
In order to understand what to expect from the green flash, it helps to know how our atmosphere affects sunlight. Coincidentally, the phenomenon responsible for the green flash is also the one that paints rainbows across Hawai‘i 's sky.



Bill
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Old 28-11-2015, 11:34   #50
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

Quote:
Originally Posted by anacapaisland42 View Post
For another piece of marine trivia look up "green flash"

What is the 'Green Flash'?
by Peter Michaud


Gemini Observatory Information Manager
Lots of people talk about it, but how many have actually seen the much-coveted green flash? If you haven't seen or heard of the green flash, it's simply a fleeting spot of intense green light on the horizon an instant after sunset or immediately before sunrise. Since Hawai‘i is one of the best places to see this phenomenon, let's explore why the green flash happens and how to improve your chances of glimpsing it safely.
First of all, when trying to spot the Green Flash don't be fooled by what I call, "The Fool's Flash". This is simply the greenish after-image burned into your retina by looking directly at the setting sun. (If you're lucky, this condition will only be temporary.) Remember, even when it's rising or setting it's still dangerous to look directly at the sun's disk. While awaiting the green flash at sunset, look away until only the very top of the sun's disk is about to disappear below the horizon - it's only during this last instant that the green flash will be visible anyway.
Secondly, the green flash is best seen when the sun sets or rises over the ocean and only when it is absolutely clear all the way to the horizon. While this might seem common in Hawai‘i, distant clouds often linger on the horizon, making the green flash much less frequent than one might imagine.
In order to understand what to expect from the green flash, it helps to know how our atmosphere affects sunlight. Coincidentally, the phenomenon responsible for the green flash is also the one that paints rainbows across Hawai‘i 's sky.



Bill
Bill, that's really interesting. Have you ever seen the 'Green Flash?' I wonder if it would be observable by all those who might be casually watching the sunset, or is it something an individual might see, unobserved by others not paying as close attention?
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Old 28-11-2015, 15:08   #51
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

No I haven't seen it, but many friends who have been on the wheel at
sunset have seen it, it is sort of a sailors trophy because, as far as I
am aware, it can pretty well only be observed at sea because that is the
best place to see a clear horizon.
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Old 28-11-2015, 17:11   #52
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

Quote:
Originally Posted by anacapaisland42 View Post
No I haven't seen it, but many friends who have been on the wheel at
sunset have seen it, it is sort of a sailors trophy because, as far as I
am aware, it can pretty well only be observed at sea because that is the
best place to see a clear horizon.
Bill
Yes, challenging to find just the right conditions. You need very clear atmospheric conditions and a view clear to the horizon on the sea. And, it only lasts for seconds, so people sitting right next to each other can easily miss it.

I've spent my life on the water and only seen it twice. Once in Marathon FL and once in West End Honduras. Both have an unobstructed view to the horizon.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_flash
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Old 28-11-2015, 17:36   #53
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

Quote:
Originally Posted by anacapaisland42 View Post
No I haven't seen it, but many friends who have been on the wheel at
sunset have seen it, it is sort of a sailors trophy because, as far as I
am aware, it can pretty well only be observed at sea because that is the
best place to see a clear horizon.
Bill
Quote:
Originally Posted by belizesailor View Post
Yes, challenging to find just the right conditions. You need very clear atmospheric conditions and a view clear to the horizon on the sea. And, it only lasts for seconds, so people sitting right next to each other can easily miss it.

I've spent my life on the water and only seen it twice. Once in Marathon FL and once in West End Honduras. Both have an unobstructed view to the horizon.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_flash
It might be a cool feature to add to the story. That and the Southern Cross. It would make for a fine place for some sort of epiphany in the character development... hmmm...
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Old 28-11-2015, 18:10   #54
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

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It might be a cool feature to add to the story. That and the Southern Cross. It would make for a fine place for some sort of epiphany in the character development... hmmm...
Need to get a bit further S for a good view of the S Cross. Its visible in Honduras, though very low on the horizon. Not sure at what latitude it ceases to be visible...easy to figure out though with all the astronomy apps available now.

Very visible here in Panama at only about N09°30'
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Old 28-11-2015, 22:47   #55
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

Actually saw the Southern Cross anchored at Great Exuma Is., Bahamas. Couldn't believe it but we looked it up in a star book and sure enough it's visible that far north for about one or two days a year.
We just happened to spot it low on the horizon one night.
An item off the bucket list the easy way lol.
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Old 28-11-2015, 23:41   #56
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

The green flash, never heard of it until five years ago. Sitting on St. Pete Beach with my brother he told me about it as the sun was setting.

Just as the sun disappears I saw it, bright and green. Was surprised I had never heard of it, but was amazed to see it mere minutes later.
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Old 29-11-2015, 04:37   #57
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
In 1984 there were plenty of electronic autopilots available, and wind driven steering systems (usually called wind vane steering) had been around for some years. The latter would be appropriate for the type of boat you are using in the story.

When we made our first offshore passage in 1983, Ann and I had an Autohelm 2000 tiller pilot on our 30 foot boat. It lasted all the way to Hawaii from SF, but failed shortly after departure on the return voyage ...
Indeed.
We had a factory installed Autohelm 1000 (or 2000?) on our 1983 C&C (launched 1984).

From the Raymarine Company History:

1984 • Launch of Autohelm 'keyboard micro' autopilots, the first cockpit autopilots in the world to employ digital control systems

1975 • British Design Award for the first Autohelm tillerpilot

1974 • Nautech/Autohelm is formed
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Old 29-11-2015, 11:34   #58
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

Quote:
Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
Indeed.
We had a factory installed Autohelm 1000 (or 2000?) on our 1983 C&C (launched 1984).

From the Raymarine Company History:

1984 • Launch of Autohelm 'keyboard micro' autopilots, the first cockpit autopilots in the world to employ digital control systems

1975 • British Design Award for the first Autohelm tillerpilot

1974 • Nautech/Autohelm is formed
Thanks for the bit of historical context--that's very helpful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by four winds View Post
The green flash, never heard of it until five years ago. Sitting on St. Pete Beach with my brother he told me about it as the sun was setting.

Just as the sun disappears I saw it, bright and green. Was surprised I had never heard of it, but was amazed to see it mere minutes later.
It must have been awesome! would love to include it in my story...

Quote:
Originally Posted by FSMike View Post
Actually saw the Southern Cross anchored at Great Exuma Is., Bahamas. Couldn't believe it but we looked it up in a star book and sure enough it's visible that far north for about one or two days a year.
We just happened to spot it low on the horizon one night.
An item off the bucket list the easy way lol.
What time of year was that?

Quote:
Originally Posted by belizesailor View Post
Need to get a bit further S for a good view of the S Cross. Its visible in Honduras, though very low on the horizon. Not sure at what latitude it ceases to be visible...easy to figure out though with all the astronomy apps available now.

Very visible here in Panama at only about N09°30'
I definitely have to look into that!
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Old 30-11-2015, 09:11   #59
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

Quote:
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----What time of year was that?
The Southern Cross in the Exumas? I was going to say summer, and EarthSky.org indicates it was probably May.
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Old 12-03-2016, 21:49   #60
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Re: Need NOLA to Caymans Advice for a Work of Fiction

Lindisfarne departing South Louisiana Coast headed non stop to Caymans this week, want to put some reality into your fictional work?, jump onboard for the trip and fly back from the Caymans when we arrive.
Lindisfarne will depart Caymans after a couple of days R&R then cut loose bound for Prov / St. Andres then San Blas and back to Panama for canal transit.
Just let us know JBC...
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