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Old 02-11-2008, 06:42   #1
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I need docking advice.

I am moving my boat from a mooring to a dock so I can leave the boat in water for the winter. My boat is a Morgan 36T. Fin keel. I have tried backing this boat and it seems imposible to have any kind of control in reverse. If I go bow first it would make it difficult to get on and off. I am expecting no help on the dock or boat.

Ok guys any advice on bumper placement, line setup and most important how to do it single-handed.



Thanks
Paul
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Old 02-11-2008, 06:59   #2
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Singlehanded? I would try and round up a couple of folk just to make life easier. but if not, my answer is.............fenders! and lots of them!

Fix some Fenders on your neighbours boats and to your own (OTT is cool). and ensure those posts are well padded.

As it sounds like your boat will pivot easily and is not "heavy heavy" plus only being 36 foot should manhandle ok I would moor her to posts 1 and 2 and use a line rigged to the floating dock to haul her forward a few feet and then her stern towards the dock using post 1 as a pivot point. I would not choose to do this in a strong tidal run, but a little bit might help.

Probably doable singlehanded (in theory ) but extra hands would be comfort to me


Or

rig lines to the Floating dock to posts 1 and 2 and get the stern close to one or the other and use the lines instead of steering (can use a bit of motor as well as manpower).


Either way some Youtube would be cool
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Old 02-11-2008, 06:59   #3
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You might be interested in our previous discussion:
Single-handed Docking Procedures

And the excellent tutorial by Captain Jack Klang
Sailboat Docking, Maneuvering and Anchoring

cfsa.vancouver.googlepages.com/DockingManeuvering.pdf
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Old 02-11-2008, 07:10   #4
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Assuming you are aiming for the open slot. Can you add current to your pretty picture? Single handing this approach will be difficult, unless you don't have an aversion to using the pillings. Not sure how you can manage spring lines, since you can't get close to the dock. If you are deadset on going it alone, I would pivot off of piling number two, placing it amidships, and then reverse into the slip. Use piling 3 as an additional touch point to keep from hitting the boats in adjacent slips. Hopefully the current is manageable, as you may need to approach the maneuver with the current in order to maintain light contact with the piling. Choose a time when current and wind are light.

Will be fun to hear how you accomplish the task.
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Old 02-11-2008, 07:38   #5
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David and swabbmob thank you for your advice.

Gord. Thanx for the Sailboat Docking, Maneuvering and Anchoring link. It is going to help.

Paul
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:23   #6
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use the momentum of the yacht. We sail a 60 ft longkeel and is very hard to steer but... we manage. Find out if you have a right turning prop and if you do know that back wards the boat tends to move to port with its stern. So take a right hand turn.... wait untill the boat is at the right angle and reverse. Now use the rest of the forward motion (to the right) to straighten it out backwards and back off. If the boat goes to far, give forward as your stern will than turn to starboard, use the momentum again and back up again...and so on. Takes a little practice but in most (fair) conditions I can get our boat in everywhere and within inches of where I want to. Ans so should you... Goood LLLuck!
(with a left turning prop... turn all directions as described)
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Old 02-11-2008, 09:22   #7
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Read all the above suggestions and threads. The main thing is to learn all the techniques you can and then apply the one(s) that make most sense at the moment you are there. Wind, current and obstructions can all be your friends if you use them correctly in your solution.

Just for the heck of it, I'll post what comes to mind to me just from the diagram. (With no current/wind info)

I'd have 3 lines handy for the initial maneuvering. And of course others handy for emergencies and final tie-off.

Line 1: from cockpit, through port bow cleat, then back to where you can get it.
Line 2: from cockpit through a cleat, hopefully about 1/3 forward from the stern, port as well. then back to where you can get it.
Line 3: hard to say exactly, but probably from the port stern.

Approach with port almost perpendicular to the shore. Put lines 1 and 2 on post 2. Start backing in. Use post 2 as a pivot. Use line 2 to control pivot and line 1 to keep bow from swinging too far to starboard. When you can, put line 3 on post 3 both to hold the stern to port, and to keep from backing into the wall.

If your boat prop-walks to starboard dramatically, you may want to reverse this. In that case, lines 1 and 2 to starboard. But with the lack of a rear post on that side, I'd leave line 3 to port and get that one tied off before the stern swings back to starboard. When prop-walk is moving you away from your target (post 3 in this case), do it slow, aim to the wrong side. Using the lines, stop the boat when you are almost touching, then either put the line on right then, or let the prop-walk move the stern to the side, and let it go back as soon as you are clear. If you try to correct too soon, you may have to go forward again to get you stern back to that side.

Pay attention to what directions the conditions make it easy to achieve and try to stay away from that. Wow, could I say that any worse? So here's an example - if it's easy to move the stern to port, keep your stern as far to starboard as you can since you know you can easily move to port if you get too far.

EDIT: I should have said, this is all supposing you have a rub rail that can handle sliding on the post.

-dan
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Old 02-11-2008, 11:02   #8
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Paul...Just call me so I can move my boat first OK..


Just Kidding..
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Old 02-11-2008, 11:24   #9
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If you don't have a rub rail/strake, look into making yourself a fender board (s).
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Old 02-11-2008, 12:30   #10
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Paul, The problem is that even if you do all of the reading and you have no experience docking the boat you are looking at a crap shoot. You may do well and you may not. Only trial and error on a boat will answer your questions. I strongly suggest for your neighbors sake that you find someone experienced and have them do the docking with you.
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Old 02-11-2008, 12:51   #11
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Captain Jack Klang, who is at most large boat shows, has an excellent dvd on docking. Check it out: Sale page for Captain Jack Klang.
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Old 02-11-2008, 13:09   #12
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See also "Docking a Single Screw"
http://www.seaskills.com/files/SeaSk...IYMagazine.pdf
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Old 02-11-2008, 13:18   #13
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A lot of good advice but i would add pre set lines on the pilings and dock. the first time have help and pre set as many lines as possible with the eyes on the boat side with a way to leave them on the outside pilings when you leave you then have a way to put lines back on and not worry about tending them when you are entering your slip you then add and adjust other lines as needed
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Old 02-11-2008, 16:47   #14
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Thanx Alondra, John, Gord. and others. I will let everyone know how I did. I still have 2 weeks to practice and fart around with the engine. Hey maybe I could sail into the dock without the Iron Genny.

Thank you all.

Paul
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Old 02-11-2008, 19:58   #15
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be glad, i cant back my boat at all, it has sever, incredible, massive, totally uncontrollable prop walk. but i have learned to parallel park my boat, i just come in at 2 knots and a 45 degree angle, hit it in reverse, by the time forward motion has stopped i am parallel to the dock, i have literally floated in side ways the last foot a few times.

as for your problem a simpler option might be a line going to the center of the floating dock on two bungy cords between the outer pillings. drive up close grab the line with the boat hook and pull yourself in, the hard part might be setting it up when you leave the slip
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