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Old 09-05-2007, 08:43   #1
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Grind down non-skid gelcoat?

I'm new to the site but wish to take advantage of the collective well-informed people here. Hopefully I can return the contribution.

I'm installing a heavy duty windlass on an area with non-skid gelcoat. Almost surely the pressure from torquing down the windlass will crush the non-skid. Would you grind these down under the windlass footprint prior to bedding or just crank down on the bolts and forget about it?
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Old 09-05-2007, 10:33   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevemac00
I'm new to the site but wish to take advantage of the collective well-informed people here. Hopefully I can return the contribution.

I'm installing a heavy duty windlass on an area with non-skid gelcoat. Almost surely the pressure from torquing down the windlass will crush the non-skid. Would you grind these down under the windlass footprint prior to bedding or just crank down on the bolts and forget about it?
Yo Steve,

it must be a very agressive nonskid pattern for you to be concerned about this aspect. Grinding is OK. More important is to flatten any deck crown under the windlass, so that you have a flat mounting surface. A spacer of teak is often used for this purpose. This spacer also keeps the windlass up out of any standing water. The bottom of the spacer can easily be shaped to the deck curvature, while leaving its' top surface flat.

I would use 3M 5200 as a sealant between mounting surfaces, and provide a heavy duty backing plate of exterior plywood on the underside of the deck to spread the loads.

best, andy
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Old 09-05-2007, 11:04   #3
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Non-skid doesn't seem aggressive - it's typical. I tend to overthink things as I envisioned these breaking off under load thus loosening the windlass. The deck is flat at this location and the reason I didn't use a block of teak under the windlass is because I'd have to also raise up the chain splitter and a few other issues. This is an Ideal H1F Windlass which is a great piece of machinery but doesn't mount like most others (e.g., separate holes for wiring and cover is mounted independently).

I was planning to use 4200. Seems 5200 would make it difficult to repair/maintain.

The PSC has a thoughtfully engineered raised/flat platform for the windlass that's over an inch thick with cored plywood. I still glassed in 1/2" FRP below this for a backing plate.

Any suggestions for wiring (1/0)? I was just planning wrap a few turns of electrical tape for added protection and silicone in separate hole for each wire. (If they ever have to be replaced, it's only a three foot run to the solenoid.)
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Old 09-05-2007, 12:10   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevemac00
Any suggestions for wiring (1/0)? I was just planning wrap a few turns of electrical tape for added protection and silicone in separate hole for each wire. (If they ever have to be replaced, it's only a three foot run to the solenoid.)
Yo Steve,

the cable from the solenoid to the windlass need not be so heavy, but you'll want to use the heaviest practical tinned finely-stranded marine battery cable from the battery bank through a circuit breaker to the solenoid. Same with the ground cable, direct from the windlass to the battery ground bus.

best, andy
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Old 09-05-2007, 14:14   #5
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Steve, rather than grinding it down (and opening the FRP up) I'd just use a dense bedding compound, or in the worst case, apply some MarineTex and a backer plate onto the deck before bolting everything over it.

Less work, less mess, less risk...OK, it's gonna cost you a couple of bucks for the epoxy or bedding compound.
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