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Old 12-05-2014, 15:45   #16
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Re: Seafoam Review

Since gasoline already contains virtually these same ingredients (ethanol and a small amount of naptha), what exactly do you expect this to accomplish? Sounds like taking vitamin C with your morning OJ; not functional unless there is a deficiency.

On the other hand, I stated that these additives have been tested for specific functionality (anti-corrosion and anti-oxidation), which is NOT a possible result of any ingredient you have formulated.

And this is why additives, like vitamins, are often thought of as snake oil; some are, and others are misapplied or misunderstood.
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Old 12-05-2014, 18:03   #17
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Re: Seafoam Review

"Since gasoline already contains virtually these same ingredients (ethanol and a small amount of naptha), what exactly do you expect this to accomplish?"

Not quite. Ethanol and isopropanol are different alcohols. And "gasohol" typically is E10, only 10% ethanol, nowhere near the amount found in SeaFoam. Among other things, running that high a percent of alcohol instead of regular fuel would burn out the plastics and rubbers used in most fuel systems, they're just not designed to resist that much alcohol of any kind.

As to things not being in the MSDS...in this case, there are no "trade secret" or similar ingredients shown. There's not even a claim that there is any magic in the bottle. The only claim is that the stuff will blow out carbon--which many things will, no secret sauce needed. Really, just old coffee will do that, as the water superheats and the steam blows out the carbon.

On cleaning out carb jets, high end solvents like GumOut will do that to some extent. If you put them in the fuel (and since the 90's all gasoline has had way more detergents in it, in the US) they will help somewhat. But in order to really clean out any accumulated varnish, you still need to take it apart, soak it in pure solvent for several hours, and physically clean it out. If you stick to the "top tier" gasolines, they claim to have enough detergent and magic in them so that varnish should not be a problem in normal use any more. That also means not letting gasoline get more the 90 days old, at the most. Or adding Stabil or a similar product. Their MSDS shows something like 99% naphtha, with yes, just one percent of magic. Which is also proven to work. And, a trade secret.
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Old 12-05-2014, 20:04   #18
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Re: Seafoam Review

^^

There is no need to claim a trade secret unless the active ingredients are also hazardous and present in material amounts. The corrosion inhibitors and anti-oxidants are neither and would not be listed, just as minor ingredients in engine coolants are not listed.

I don't work for the company; ran side-by-side ASTM tests, including controls and matrix spikes, that told a clear and different story. Just sayin' that basing detailed performance arguments on MSDS information is probably silly, and I really wish folks would stop doing it as they can get themselves in trouble, trying to match formulations.

One ingredient that is in every engine coolant, by law, is Bitrex, for example. Not listed and not secret. Just not disclosed.
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Old 12-05-2014, 20:15   #19
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Re: Seafoam Review

When I rebuild engines it is always a pain to clean the carbon out of the ring grooves...bust chunks out with a broken ring. I found if you put the piston crown in a container of SeaFoam for an hour the carbon turns to mush and brushes out. I have to believe it will do some of the same to a running engine.

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Old 12-05-2014, 20:21   #20
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Re: Seafoam Review

I've used the SeaFoam gasoline additive for years in all my small gasoline engines, both 2- and 4-stroke. Nothing works as well for getting rid of and preventing ethanol-produced gunk in the fuel system, carbon build-up, and fuel stabilizing.

I've always known about the simple, old-fashioned formulation, but -- who cares? -- it works!
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Old 12-05-2014, 20:46   #21
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Re: Seafoam Review

" basing detailed performance arguments on MSDS information is probably silly, "
Which is probably why the only person to mention MSDSes here, me, hasn't made any kind of detailed performance argument at all.

Just the simple statement that their MSDS lists some basic ingredients that are long known to do the job by themselves. Just like water and day old coffee.
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Old 13-05-2014, 05:47   #22
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Re: Seafoam Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ukeluthier View Post
I've used the SeaFoam gasoline additive for years in all my small gasoline engines, both 2- and 4-stroke. Nothing works as well for getting rid of and preventing ethanol-produced gunk in the fuel system, carbon build-up, and fuel stabilizing.

I've always known about the simple, old-fashioned formulation, but -- who cares? -- it works!
+1

I also know of other tricks such as spraying a small stream of water into the intake while it is running to "steam clean" the cylinders. Now that I've found sea foam and have tested that it works very well I would rather pay for their research and buy the product knowing someone smarter then me developed something a little more sophisticated then water.

I do appreciate everyone's take on the matter and what Thinwater and hellosailor have both brought up is very good food for thought. Overall I really just wanted to let people know that if they were looking for something to buy off the shelf to help their gasoline engine this product works very well.
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