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Old 17-03-2004, 06:08   #1
mpk
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1st few weeks of boat ownership

In our hunt for a cat, my husband and I keep asking the same question, "when we buy it, can we bring our stuff (and cats) on board right away if they still have work to do on it?" For instance, the Catamaran Co. has a dock that they do work at but I'm not sure about the living conditions, but there might be some sort of grace period or something... Anyone have any experience with this kind of thing?
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Old 17-03-2004, 07:01   #2
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This is one of those situations that can vary pretty widely from dealer to dealer and is something that I try to negotiate up front. Without some kind of accord to the contrary, when you close on a boat, you own her and are responsible for providing storage for her. Most agreements provide some language to the effect that the boat must be removed from the premises by some period (usually a week or two but the length of time is a matter for negotiation.) In the case of a boat stored in a boat yard, you typically become responsible for the storage costs from the time that you close on the boat, although there is often a prepayment on a slip and you are often able to remain for the duration of that prepayment.

In the case where a dealer is commissioning a boat for you, I would typically try to negotiate that the Dealer pays for dockage until the boat commissioning has been completed. This does two things, it gives you some time to get familiar with the boat and to find a place to move the boat, and it is an incentive for the yard to get the work done more quickly.

Unless your agreement says otherwise, once you have closed the purchase, the boat is yours and you can move your 'stuff' aboard. That said, if they are commissioning the boat you might not want to as it will mean shifting things around to make room for the workers and you could end up with a lot of fiberglass dust in your clothes, not a very comforting thought. Commissioning a boat is a big job and a messy one and so I am not sure that I would want to live aboard while this is going on.

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Old 17-03-2004, 08:54   #3
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Thanks for your advice. Every day I learn something new. Of course I just saw a boat that would be perfect because it has everything we want within our price range, but it's in Turkey and that might be too much of a stretch to have it brought over, etc..
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Old 20-03-2004, 17:54   #4
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I have a few weeks off lets go to turkey and get it .
What cat are you looking at ?
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Old 21-03-2004, 09:31   #5
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I'm not sure our experience will be instructive, but here goes....
We are buying a new cat directly from the factory. She is now in the water and commissioning has begun. The factory said we could start moving things aboard in a couple of weeks. While that sounded good, after giving it some thought we decided against it. Why? Because until the boat is ours (i.e., we have paid the last of the hold-back for punch list items and they have given us the bill of sale), anything can happen. The factory is only responsible for the boat and the items they are installing on it - not our things. So any workman could help himself (or herself) while we are not there. I also checked with our insurance agent, and she STRONGLY suggested that we would have no coverage for personal items until the boat is OURS. So we are resisting the temptation and keeping the apartment for an extra month "just in case".
I noticed in your post you said that the boat would be yours before they finish the work they have to do on it. Are you sure you want to do that? What is their incentive to complete the work to your satisfaction once they have their $$? Is there any hold-back until the work is done?
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Old 22-03-2004, 09:23   #6
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What do you mean by "still working on it"?

Are you talking about a new boat as Harriet is? If so I would follow Harriet’s advice and not take responsibility for it until all is correct.

On the other hand, if you are buying a used boat and paying for your own upgrades after you take possession, then I would say you are better off to be aboard where you can observe the upgrades. Once the contract is complete and full payment made, the boat is yours and you are responsible for it and any work done by the broker.

As for dock space, you would have to negotiate this with the broker prior to signing the contract. I don't think it would have to be part of the contract between you and the buyer, but could be a separate document between you and the broker. At the Chesapeake Catamaran Center they offered me a reduced price for a slip at their dock in Annapolis. It was a good rate for Annapolis, but higher than I wanted to pay. So, the boat will stay on the hard until I go get it in May.

Woody
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Old 26-03-2004, 07:03   #7
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I've been away from my "post " for a bit- the "still working on it" refers to used boats that we are considering. The work would be any cosmetic things , uholstery, ssb installation, etc. Personally, I would prefer a boat that doesn't need any additions (good luck), however my husband believes that to stay within our budget and get the design we like, we will have to get some things added. I, on the other hand, believe that since we are in Chicago, and the vessel will likely be in Florida, having the work done before we get there would be an exercise in cash burning. (many charming discussions over this one) Doing the work while living aboard could be strange as well. Perhaps one of you folks could enlighten "us" on the process labor on used boats- while not in the same state...
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Old 27-04-2004, 08:30   #8
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If there is work required on the boat you buy, I would not have the work done prior to closing the deal. Instead I would negotiate the price lower and have it done yourself. With the items on your list I would do most of the items yourself after you move aboard. There are somethings you can do from Chicago. You can remove all of the cushions and take them home for new covers. Tasks like installing an SSB may require learning new skills, but having those skills later will be invaluable. Consider one of you moving on board a month ahead to complete the work while the other stays behind to wrap up personal business.

Woody
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Old 06-05-2004, 13:35   #9
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Big news- we just got the call -buyers and sellers agree and signatures faxed - all we need is the survey completed. As far as we know, the boat floats and we ar as happy as clams and slightly punchy at the whole idea. I can't wait to add the s/v name to my profile since it's the reason we are now oficially broke! We won't need to worry about the cats during work because it's being done as we speak and on this one, there's not much to do- thank goodness. We can't belive it finally happened- I feel like sending out berth announcements. --definitely cornball giddy...
hooray for small miracles!
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Old 06-05-2004, 13:41   #10
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Congratulations!! Tell us about your new pride and joy...
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Old 07-05-2004, 09:14   #11
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Well, I do not want to mess up a good thing by going into too much detail in regards to the boat. This poor vessel has to go through a survey and sea trial, has to have a few repairs done, some cosmetic work, etc. Too much paparazzi just might sour the girl, however her nationality is French and decends from the Lagoon family. We still have to wait for the final papers and pay off the man. Our kitty cats have no idea what they are in for. Neither do we!
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Old 07-05-2004, 09:24   #12
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......I wanted to add that I have been in email contact for the last month or so with the Bumfuzzled crew and if you haven't seen the site lately, they have successfully made it through the canal! We have been discussing the guys at 2hulls, buying the boat, insurance (which we need more help on) and lots of other things. Their journey has givenus a lot of confidence and we feel like we have made some new friends out at sea. I will try and keep up with the seven seas site, but it seems they know so much more that we do, our questions would just get referred to earlier posts and requests for copies of old publicatons. We are members and I am excited to fly the burgee!
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Old 07-05-2004, 09:41   #13
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another convert

Conratulations on your almost purchase - hopefully it will go thru without a hitch. I just switched fom a monohull and am awaiting delivery of my new boat from North Carolina to the Great lakes. I came out of a Beneteau 331 and am now the proud owner of a
PDQ32.
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Old 07-05-2004, 10:32   #14
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Good for you! We looked at a PDQ but for us the outboard situation could't work. Nice boat!
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Old 07-05-2004, 11:47   #15
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I know what you mean. I was cautious about calling her "our boat" until the bill of sale was in hand. Let us know when she's truly yours...

Woody
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