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Old 14-12-2009, 13:23   #1
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The Perfect Long-Range Cruising Yacht ?

Over many years and many miles I have pondered this question and have come up with many solutions. As I am now attempting to put pencil to paper it occured to me that it would be a good idea to ask the forum.

What do you look for in a long range cruising yacht ?

What boats do you admire ?

What features do you like in existing designs ?

What features do you dislike in existing designs ?

Why ???
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Old 14-12-2009, 13:44   #2
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There are books written about this and many previous posts and differnent philosophies.

I personally have a few things on my list (I like monohulls):

1) my wife likes it.
2) Centre cockpit (a private spacious aft cabin)
3) Big enough to make sense for a cc i.e greater than 40 feet
4) lots tankage
5) strong and sea worthy
6) storage
7) pilot berths
8) an large engine room!!!! (I really like this)
9) set up for short handed sailing - I like a sailtrack that works effortlessly and lazy jacks with stack pack
10) space for a seperate area for each of my 2 kids
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Old 14-12-2009, 13:57   #3
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1) my wife likes it. What does she like ????

2) Centre cockpit (a private spacious aft cabin) I agree totally

3) Big enough to make sense for a cc i.e greater than 40 feet How much bigger ?

4) lots tankage Yes

5) strong and sea worthy A must

6) storage A must

7) pilot berths Where ?

8) an large engine room!!!! (I really like this) Tell me more

9) set up for short handed sailing - I like a sailtrack that works effortlessly and lazy jacks with stack pack I agree

10) space for a seperate area for each of my 2 kids Understandable



Some good points there keep it coming
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Old 14-12-2009, 14:02   #4
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And, to give you an example:

I personally like the following:

1) Fiberglass
2) Aft Cockpit
3) 36 feet on deck or less
4) Small diesel engine
5) Sea worthy
6) Narrow beam
7) Tough
8) Performance oriented
9) Cutter or sloop

Check the last link behind my signature for some suggestions
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Old 14-12-2009, 14:46   #5
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1) Fiberglass Why ?

2) Aft Cockpit In a smaller boat yes

3) 36 feet on deck or less Why do you like smaller boats ?

4) Small diesel engine As long as it is powerful enough when needed

5) Sea worthy A must

6) Narrow beam Why ?

7) Tough Definately

8) Performance oriented To what extreeme ?

9) Cutter or sloop Why ?
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Old 14-12-2009, 14:52   #6
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Wood- preferences differ and I have my reasons.
Long
Skinny
Deep w/a full keel
Two stick rig (I like yawls better than ketches)
Strong build
Decent tankage
Lots 'O bunks (for lots 'o kids)
weatherly
Seaworthy *see 2,3,and 4 above.
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Old 14-12-2009, 15:58   #7
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and one more little thing...

gotta be paid for....
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Old 14-12-2009, 15:59   #8
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1) my wife likes it. What does she like ????

I can't answer totally but the way I understand it: as we have kids she likes a boat the inspires safety based on her research. Good rigging and reputation for Bluewater capability. And finally a space that she can make feel like her home. Stowage is very important. She also wants to be able to carry 'stuff' enough to feel comfortable living on the boat.

3) Big enough to make sense for a cc i.e greater than 40 feet How much bigger ? We have a Cal 2-46. I looked at the Tayana 42 too.

4) lots tankage Yes

5) strong and sea worthy A must

6) storage A must

7) pilot berths Where ? We have had to create them on our boat as this is one thing that didn't come standard, by basically turning settees into pilot berths using lee clothes. We are thinking of taking one settee

8) an large engine room!!!! (I really like this) Tell me more. The Valiant 40, Spencer 43 and Cal 46 where all boats that had an awesome engine room you could install equipment and even work in! Alot of boats you have to take off the the table or the campanion way stairs. If you are living aboard this disruption would be too much stress to add to the stress of some engine repair.

9) set up for short handed sailing - I like a sailtrack that works effortlessly and lazy jacks with stack pack I agree

10) space for a seperate area for each of my 2 kids Understandable There many who quite rightly agree that small/simple is better ...and I agree but if you are living on board with kids things change. Also a happy wife = happy life. Although if you can go small and simple you will save a lot!!!

Wood boats are beautiful, but I do think they are more work. I have enough on my plate.

Finally performance. This is another huge debate. I have chosen a heavy strong boat that is comfortable in most sea conditions. If the wind is very light, we will likely have to fire up the iron genny. But in anything over 10 knots and close reach or deeper, our 16 ton 46 foot ketch moves along really well with good speed. We burn very very little fuel in general, but if we do have to motor we can.

A diesel sailboat typically burns very very little fuel.
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Old 14-12-2009, 16:10   #9
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We can probably all agree on "seaworthy." After that it becomes a matter of the size of your family, the size of your budget and personal preferences.
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Old 14-12-2009, 16:24   #10
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Hard to say whether we should kill or bless such posters ... they are dangerous, true, but they also keep the dream ticking!

The perfect long range cruising yacht:


What do you look for in a long range cruising yacht ?
-it should be the tool for the job; because I like to paint with the brush and eat with the spoon, rather than the other way round,

What boats do you admire ?
- safe, comfortable, fast; because I want to get safely there and back, because I want to travel, not to suffer, because in a long range cruise the faster boat can travel longer distances without pit-stops,

What features do you like in existing designs ?
- the deck-houses like in Boungavillea, the simple rig like in Ourson Rapide, the furling genakers; because of comfort, because a simple rig is a trouble-free rig, because sailing with a furling genaker is much easier than with a spinnaker,

What features do you dislike in existing designs ?
- deck salons; because they are big deck breaches waiting to happen, too beamy interiors; because it is so easy to fly across them and break a rib or two; in-mast furling mains - because they jam too often,

barnie
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Old 14-12-2009, 17:55   #11
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Ok, Assuming a strong seaworthy vessel,

...an aft head/shower... I don't want to have to go forward...to change out of wet gear, or do my business.

I prefer dinettes or booth style tables/ seating that allow movement forward and aft.

Plenty of sturdy handholds.. I'd prefer stainless...on deck (cabin top ) and below, I have enough teak.

A nice bow entry and enough power to motor to windward in those short choppy seas..when I need to.

I'm sure there's more..
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Old 14-12-2009, 20:33   #12
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No question about it: a Sundeer 64:

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cheers,
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Old 15-12-2009, 07:37   #13
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Most like lines led to the cockpit but I do not. A flush deck arrangement with halyards and reefing lines at the mast keeps cockpit clutter down and lines out from under foot.
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Old 15-12-2009, 09:08   #14
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I'm Surprised

I'm surprised that keels have not been discussed more. I think that for a long distance offshore boat, a full keel is the only way to go. The tracking of a full keel should make it the only choice for a true blue water boat. I know they are usually slower, and most if not all are slow to react to rudder input, but for offshore the tracking abilities outweigh these negatives, IMHO. And a well designed full keeler has a more comfortable motion. Other than that, what has already been said.
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Old 15-12-2009, 11:00   #15
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To me, the biggest issue is whether or not the extra speed conferred by a long waterline is worth the price you pay for it. It's not just the money. It's the reliance on complex systems and the potential hazards when those systems break down. Also there is the need for extra crew plus the difficulty of handling these boats in close quarters when you get to a harbor.
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